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Cincinnati Hubspotter's Meetup - Growth driven design

Fri, Dec 02, 2016 @ 03:42 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency, american dream composite index, growth driven design

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Growth driven design is a "build it fast and fix it fast" goal focused web site building method.

Growth-Driven-design.jpg

Hubspot is the perfect platform to create Growth Driven Sites.

We attended the Cincinnati Hubspotter's Meetup today for soup and a presentation by Cleriti on Growth Driven Design. We've attended many lectures and webinars on the subject so here are the highlights.

Pick the minimum number of goals, create calls to action, landing pages, content and launch. Get feedback, adjust and measure again. Repeat.

Continuous improvement:
Audience
Value
Usability
Conversion rate optimization
Stickiness
Personalization
Assets
Promoters

Analytic tools:
"Hotjar" is a heat map of your site that will tell you were your vistitors are getting hung up.
"UserTesting" is a service that asks your demographics to give you feedback

Methodology narrative example:
For this "persona" visiting the "homepage", we believe changing the "graphic" into an "interactive & linked graphic" will increase "conversions" because of "these analytics"

 

(If you liked this post you might like "Do you care more for your audience than SEO?"


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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October 2016 American Dream Composite Index Report

Fri, Nov 25, 2016 @ 11:08 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency, american dream composite index

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(Lohre & Associates and O'Keeffe Public Relations helped launch the American Dream Composite Index and are happy to repost their reports here every chance we get. This index is exactly what it says it is, a measure of the degree that Americans think they have achieved the American Dream. Enjoy.)

What is the ADCI?

The American Dream Composite Index™ (ADCI) is a unique and robust measure of American sentiment that values the American Dream on a monthly basis. 

The notion of the American Dream encompasses our behaviors, attitudes and satisfaction with economic conditions, personal well-being, societal and political institutions, cultural diversity, and the physical environment. 

The ADCI reveals what people living in the United States do, strive for, work for, wish for, and ultimately, hope for as they assume multiple roles, including but not limited to, consumers, parents, children, students, employees, employers, parishioners, voters, etc.

American-Dream-Composite-Index-Oct-2016.png

Composite Index
Is 65.54, up .23% from September. This is a small change driven by small changes to the sub-indices. The economic, well-being and environmental sub-indices are all up in October, the societal index is down, and the diversity index is flat.

Economic Index
Increased slightly to 64.49 in October, a .38% change compared to September. This increase is a result of increases to the dimensions of Job Environment, Job Benefits, Freedom of Choice and Destinations in Life. Home ownership had a significant decline in October and other constructs for the ADEI are mostly unchanged.

Well Being Index
Increased slightly to 70.77, a .49% change from September. This small increase is primarily the result of increases to the dimensions of Happiness, Leisure Activities, and the Support of Someone Special.

Societal Index
Decreased to 54.36, a change of .30% from September. This change is the result of decreases across the board in the ADSI, but primarily Trust in Business and Trust in Government. Safety in the Community is the only dimension to have a significant increase in October after the significant lows we observed for this dimension in September.

Diversity Index
Is mostly unchanged in October, changing only slightly up .13% from September to 73.86. Even though the ADDI is unchanged in October, the dimension of Melting Pot—Diversity is down slightly and Political Freedom is up slightly.

Environmental Index
Is up very slightly by .4% in October to 69.46.

Extra Insites from the October Index
This month, we asked a few extra questions with the ADCI survey related to the current political election season. A few insights are:

  • 25% of millennial respondents say they get their political news primarily from social media compared to 16% for all other generations.
  • Over half of all survey takers say the person they would like to vote for is not running in the current election. This sentiment is most shared by those reporting to be of a conservative or moderate political identity. Only 40% of liberals said the same.
  • In spite of so many people saying they are unsatisfied by the current presidential offerings, 75% of all respondents say this is the most important presidential election of their lifetime.
  • ADCI scores for those of moderate or conservative ideology are 2 points higher on average compared to those of liberals.

(If you liked this post you might likeRobots, Cobots & the American Dream - Metalworking Equipment Marketing Ripe for Inbound)

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Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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17 Years Ago My Father Died. He Taught Me Industrial Marketing.

Wed, Nov 23, 2016 @ 01:00 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency

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wo 

Thomas-G-Lohre-Sr.jpgThe 1980 version,
"Lohre & Associates is a full-service ad agency, a member of the Four-A's, a long-established business, in continuous operation in Cincinnati for more than 40 years. We serve a variety of clients in the tri-state, some for as long as 25 years. We have a seasoned professional crew that knows the ropes in creating all kinds of selling communications, for highly technical industries, heavy capital equipment, or consumer goods marketing. Don't miss the boat! If you're looking for smoother sailing in your important selling as you chart your company's course for the 1980's, call Lohre & Associates now."

LEED Platinum Plaque.jpg

The 2016 version,
"Lohre & Associates is a full-service ad agency, a member of the U.S. Green Building Council, a long-established business, in continuous operation in Cincinnati for more than 80 years. We serve a variety of clients worldwide, some for as long as 55 years. We have a seasoned professional crew that knows the brick and mortar in creating all kinds of selling communications, for highly technical industries, heavy capital equipment, or sustainable building materials. Don't miss your grand entrance! If you're looking for an easy build in your important selling as you plan your company's growth for the 2010's, call Lohre & Associates now."

My LinkedIn Profile,
"I started work as a graphic artist at my father's (Thomas G. Lohre, Sr.) industrial marketing ad agency, Lohre & Associates, in 1977. We specialize in machine tools, mining and processing equipment. The agency grew in the 90s and survived the 2000s. Our latest initiative has been in the sustainable building materials and services industries. Janet's and my purchase of a Frank Lloyd Wright designed home in 2003 rekindled my interest in architecture. I have followed the U.S. Green Building Council's education path to learn how to serve this industry. We founded Green Cincinnati Education Advocacy in 2009 and self documented our office LEED Platinum in 2011. As a Green Building consultancy, we certified GreenSource Cincinnati's office LEED Platinum in 2013. In 2012, Lohre & Assoc. became a Hubspot Partner to offer best practices in internet marketing."


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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In the Future, Marketing Will Be Automated - #Inbound16

Sat, Nov 12, 2016 @ 02:11 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency

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This is the future I learned of at Inbound 2016, the Hubspot internet marketing conference in Boston last week. Hubspot is a marketing automation software system we have used for the last three years. 

 
I listened to stories of hardened industrial sales guys wanting to abandon email marketing because it was a waste. It brought a sly smile to the marketing guy that then told him how their recent 12 million dollar account started from a LinkedIn post. He had the proof. And the young lady telling the story of how what used to be a year long courtship for a $200,000 software purchase was reduced to two months because the new client had already read all about the capabilities of the company and didn't need to have a honeymoon.
 Marketing-Automation-Inbound-2016.jpg

All of my clients want to come up on the first page of Google. That is the question I wanted answered. What I learned is that now Siri understands language better than humans do. 20% of all searches are by voice , now. And Google knows who you are, where you are and predicts what you want. If you want to be on the first page fo Google you're going to have to predict what your customers want. And how they ask for it.

(To be continued)

Learn more with our Marketing Handbook which needs to be updated with this info.


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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Industrial Marketing Ideas from Inbound 2016

Wed, Nov 09, 2016 @ 04:24 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency

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Today's post is an industrial marketing ideas report from Inbound 2016 in Boston this week. These are my notes from founders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah's presentation.
 IMG_0614.jpg

Brian

  1. Now ad words are 100% above the fold
  2. Facebook now has "Pay per lead" it's a big change
  3. Now we have 14 vendors versus 5 ten years ago
  4. Paid content and content marketing go well together
  5. Ten years ago the web site augmented the sales person. Today the sales person augments the web site.
  6. Questions are the new keyword phrase
  7. 50 percent of content needs to be video
  8. Users want a self service environment with your brand
  9. More people don't have a phone on their desk. Please don't leave a voice mail.
  10. Start with the sale and work backwards.  The cold call is dead. Sales start with a personal email fron a sales rep, that sends 10 well thought out emails per day versus 100.
  11. Today, customers expect value before the sale. Use a Casper mattress for 100 days before paying.
  12. Always be closing, Is now always be helping
  13. Emails. Less is more.  
  14. Cold calls. None is more.
  15. Trials. A taste is more.
  16. Sales reps still have the power and knowledge. But later in the sales process.
  17. 58% of sales starts with customers talking with each other
  18. 47% from media articles
  19. Base commission, pricing and recurring revenue plan on customer success
  20. Take dollars from marketing and spend it on adding value to your customer delight
  21. Terrible time to be the incumbent. 50% churn at the top 500 world brands

 

Darmesh

  1. 1994 internet founded
  2. The reason google succeeded because they tracked the link graph. 3.5 billion searches per day.
  3. Facebook has the private social person link graph. 2 billion searches per day.
  4. Amazon has the product search link graph
  5. The way to win at SEO is to focus on the HEO human engagement optimization
  6. Soon text to audio will be human like
  7. On mobile they use apps 80% of the time, not browsers
  8. Messaging apps have more users than other apps.  Now Slack. Teams and Facebook Work
  9. Messaging trust is stronger than email
  10. Chatbots will be huge because the interface is human like. Hubspot building growthbots.
  11. Ask Growthbot who are the law firms that use google apps in boston. Then add it to leads.
  12. Growthbot.org and message. "inbound is awesome" and you will have access to the beta
  13. His prediction is that AI will become more human like
  14. We will have automous self driving marketing automation. The only problem will be having all the data in one place.  
  15. We can now wish for what we want and sometimes our wish is granted.

Learn more with our Marketing Handbook which needs to be updated with this info.


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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Process Equipment Marketing Product Launches

Fri, Oct 21, 2016 @ 02:29 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency

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(Thanks to Christian Naberhaus with Roto-Disc for giving us the opportunity to work on his new expanded processing equipment marketing catalog which includes two new product lines. And his testimonial letter.)
 
 
Roto-Disc-process-equipment-marketing.jpg
 
15 September, 2016
 
Chuck Lohre
Lohre & Assoc.
126A West 14th Street, 2nd Floor
Cincinnati, OH 45202-7535
 
Chuck.
 
I’d like to thank Lohre & Associates for your help in producing our latest 36-page catalog and website. We introduced several new products and your 3D illustration capabilities helped communicate the new diverter and process transition offering quite effectively.
 
For the past 15 years you’ve helped first my father and now me with Roto-Disc’s marketing. It’s a pleasure to work with you and your team. To have access to talent that knows chemical and food processing equipment, the trade journals and current best practices in industrial marketing makes all the difference. We look forward to many successful product introductions with your help.
 
Our company tagline is "When all else fails," which I can update for other industrial marketers -- "When all else fails, call Chuck Lohre"!
 
Best regards,
 
P. Christian Naberhaus, President, Roto-Disc, Inc.
 
 

Process-Equipment-Marketing.png

Download the brochure by clicking on the cover or here.

Learn more with our Marketing Handbook.


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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11 Essential Steps for Creating Your New Website Design

Tue, Sep 13, 2016 @ 10:00 AM / by Myke Amend posted in Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Web Design Company, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, Internet Development, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Website Design Company, Featured, Web Design

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Website Design Directions SignThough our Cincinnati web design agency tends to advocate repairing and improving cheap, DIY, outdated, or otherwise bad websites wherever and whenever possible, sometimes a new website build or complete website redesign is necessary.

If your company is new to the web, or if your business has a new website to build, it is important to have a solid web design plan in place before moving forward.

If you are hiring a web designer or web design company to do the work, pre-planning can still save an incredible amount of time and frustration, and guide the process toward having the best results from what will likely be your company's most important sales and lead generation tool for years to come.

In this post we'll outline the best process to build a great website with the best marketing potential.

Top most important steps toward designing your new web site:

Buyer Personas for Website DesignBad: "Elmo Haletosis Dinglefaartz the IIIrd: drinks lots of gin, and wears an eyepatch. Hates hayrides and squirrels."

Good:
"Inigo Montoya: Parking lot mogul and CEO with properties in Cincinnati, Covington, and Newport. Has purchased 15 demolition sites in the downtown area and is looking for concrete to pave them with. He does not want to interact or commit at this time, just wants basic questions answered." 

Step 1: Buyer Personas - Know your website's ideal visitor

It is easy to go down the path of designing a website for the company itself. Many designers go into web design projects with the company's image or even their own portfolio in mind first, and already in great danger of turning the website into a very expensive vanity project for the designer and company alike.

In this case, let's imagine a Concrete company whose website boasts that they are the greatest, oldest, and biggest in the area. They have lots of pages on CEOS, CFOs, pictures of big trucks and big projects, and are wondering why the site fails to generate new leads and customers.

While it is important to impress and even dazzle visitors, it is more important to consider the ideal visitors' primary needs. Knowing what will bring your ideal visitors to your website, knowing what information they'll be seeking, knowing how to inform and how to boost confidence, having a plan to help them them become satisfied customers should be the primary focus.

Imagine these ideal customers, give them names, ages, likely job titles, unique needs that brought them to you - and write these down. You are done. These are your buyer personas, and you are ready for the next step:

Guide to Creating Buyer Personas for Business by Lohre Marketing & Advertising, Cincinnati

Step 2: Consider the buyer's journey, and draw them a map

not a good web site map
Not a very good map for your website

Put yourself in your buyer persona's shoes. Consider what problems they came seeking solutions for, what questions helped them find you, how you might help them. Realistically define the process. Is your solution one that might require days, even months of decision-making, or a fast and easy choice? Having buyer personas in mind, allows you to map your website accord to their needs.

You might ask yourself these things:
  • How will I attract my buyer persona?
  • What information will I need to qualify them as leads?
  • What solutions will I need to provide them in return for this information?
  • What further interactions will encourage them to change from leads into customers?
  • How do I make those customers into return customers?
  • How do I encourage them to give great reviews and word of mouth promotion?

If you have answered all of these questions in detail, congratulations - you've outlined your marketing path, and sales funnel.

a very bad website design marketing funnel
This is not a very good sales funnel for your website. Chances are you will not be allowed to put people into actual funnels, or to feed them to bees.
a basic, bland, and vague and useless web site marketing funnel
That's a little bit better... in a very generic and vague way. Show that you really have a plan for this specific site, for this specific business.
web design online marketing funnel
Try to design your funnel specifically for your website, not just *any* site. The funnel could demonstrate a strategy for an entire site or a business - but most often, it will center around only one primary offer.

 

Step 3: Outline and Flow Chart

web-design-outline.pngOutline: Be thorough. Think how many pages and subpages deep this website will need to go. Also be sure to consider landing pages, which might not fall into the base hierarchy of the site.

An outline ensures that content flows in a way that is convenient and helpful to the average visitor. It also helps you to think of the process, and what content the process will require. You may find that you need more pages than you thought, but you might also find pages that can be ommited, or can be combined into one.

I recommend working on this outline in a word processing application, or anyplace where you can easily edit bulleted lists within bulleted lists.

When done, you have all you need to create a basic flowchart. Flow charts are simply graphical outlines for people who prefer flow charts over outlines (most people). Since this is mostly to illustrate how one could go from one page to the next, you don't need to get very fancy with it - blocks and lines will do (like the very simple web site flow chart to the right).

If however everyone involved is familiar with process flow chart symbols, you might want to go a step further and make an actual process flow chart ( https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Create-a-basic-flowchart-f8e57ca2-0c24-4760-bc2e-8812d7310c6a )

Step 4: Block it out.

web-design-board-f.pngOutline: Be thorough. Think how many pages and subpages deep this web site will need to go. Also be sure to consider landing pages, which might not fall into the base hierarchy of the site.

Before doing any graphic design, you need to know how the web site and its elements are going to work together - how they are going to present information, which elements need to grab attention, how, and why.

I like to use a styrofoam board, pins, string, construction paper, and multi-colored Post-its on an open wall or large corkboard. A large table will however do, but is not as fun, and you will probably need that table for other things before the project is completed. Don't worry now about how the website will look. Think instead about how layers will interact or be animated, where slideshows or movies might go, whether sidebars will exist and where, the function of the footer, which pages might have forms, and how they are to be presented.

Use your content outline as a guide. If you have already selected a CMS and templates, you should also consult those from time to time. Content in this stage, might be as simple as sticky notes that read "colorful image to illustrate B2B", "bulleted list with types of advertising", "CTA: View our helpful video!", or as advanced as photos and printed paragraphs.

Chances are you might eventually need something more portable than the crime wall or office table. If so, refine your flow chart based on the work from this stage, print it, and print numbered pages to correspond with each block. These pages and their content should reflect the pages on your wall.

Step 5: Software selection

By now you should a good idea what sort of CMS you will need for your web design project, as well as what you will need plugins and add-ons for. If you are not designing from a theme you have previously made, and don't plan to build one from scratch, this would be a good time to choose a theme to build from. This is also a good time to search the web for compatibility issues between software, themes, and plugins.

If the company has graphic standards established, they'll likely require a specific font stack for their website design. Make sure the needed fonts are available as web fonts, and know how much they will cost.

If the company does not have graphic standards established, this is a something you should discuss. Make sure that creating a corporate identity package is in the budget, or that graphic standards will be available by the time design work begins.

You now have a good idea of how the web site will function, know what software you will be using, and that there no known conflicts between. You also know that everything you are proposing to do can be done, how to do it, and have factored in outside costs.

Step 6: Mid-project meeting

this website meeting actually should not be an emailNo Skeletor, This meeting is not one of those. This is actually a great place to be and a very exciting time... halfway to launch!
Source:
memegenerator.net

If you are designing this web site for others, or need to consult with your colleagues, this is a great place for a mid-project meeting.

You've got a lot of information to share and things to discuss before moving ahead, perhaps too much. You can't cover everything here, but what is covered here will be shaped by the priorities, concerns, and schedules of those involved.

You have firmly established purpose, goals, needed software, server requirements, page count, content needs, new challenges, and additional costs. You also have a flow chart that serves as a map to build and design the site by.

This flow chart serves well as an itemized list of textual and graphical content needed for the site. You, the client, or your marketing team should begin creating and collecting the content needed for the completed website - Encourage them to tell their brand story, and to gather and create strong images to illustrate that story with.

Step 7: Installation, Setup, and Testing

website-hosting.jpgSome web designers would jump to the design stage before this, and if you are designing for others you may at least have been asked to make graphical mockups in order to get this far.

If you have that option, get everything installed, behaving properly, and at least semi-configured before wasting everyone's time on preemptive design. Hypothetical appearances tend to die horribly from compatibility issues, and actual needs.

If you build in a folder on the site's intended server, and test it, you will know that the site, and plugins work in that environment. This also gives you the ability to design in place, directly working with the actual product of Javascript, HTML, and CSS that the server-to-be will assemble from the CMS, plugins, and themes you chose.

Step 8: Framework

By the end of this stage, using your outline, you should have a good working website with all navigation working, and all proposed pages created. These pages are likely populated with lorem ipsum and placeholder images at this point, and that is okay.

Step 9: Basic Graphic Standards

This is a mini-stage before adding content. At this stage, we are still not out to create any more design elements than we absolutely have to, but we want a good idea of what our content will look like in order to improve upon it, and to design for it.

Whether you are working from an existing theme, or you started off with a structure that was devoid of any styling at all, this is a small stage where you should change colors and fonts to meet with the company's graphic standards, and remove styles and graphical elements that would compete with this branding.

Finish this stage by adding the company logo, preferably in .SVG format (Scalable Vector Graphics) so that it looks its very best at any size or resolution.

Step 10: Populate!

What? Still no design? Are you crazy?

Realistically, yes, but also consider that you already have a lot of finished design at this point:

If you have branding, you have fonts, a defined color palette, and a logo. You also have your crime lab-style layout from step 4, meaning that you have the user interface mostly planned out. You also know how navigation and pages will work together as a story to guide your visitors through the website.

If you were able to make it to this stage without submitting graphical mockups for revision, revision, and revision of purely-hypothetical concepts, you have an opportunity to think ahead about graphical styles and touches here, and are a very lucky designer for it. If your job is design only, hopefully you've been given content by this point, if it isn't you should focus on your content creation before proceeding.

Add in all of your text with only general styles (h1, h2, h3, p, br, blockquote, etc.), use placeholders in place of images, use bootstrap rules for your general layout so that all elements of fractional widths behave uniformly and responsively. I'd recommend skipping on internal links at this point, else you'll have to remember which content you were and were not yet able to assign internal links to.

Be sure to consider SEO in your choosing of permalinks as you go. This is easier to do now than to correct later. Don't obsess on this if it slows you down though, you can always correct with 301s if you have to, and/or a good find & replace job if your website's structure is data-driven.

Step 11: FINALLY! Design

This is not the stage where design typically happens, but it is the stage where design *should* happen.

Previous ideas and mockups here would have served more as constraint than inspiration. Making the functionality of the web site mesh with designs made information was gathered and framework, would be much like hammering a non-euclidian peg into a two-dimensional hole.

If you are like me, and have reached the point where working with CSS and HTML in place is much like, even easier than laying out a design in Illustrator or Photoshop, then you will likely be doing the bulk of your web site design with your text editor of choice and an FTP client, while keeping Photoshop, Illustrator, and/or GIMP open for making textures, creating graphics, and editing photos.

However you do your design work, having not spent too much time on graphics up to this point, allows for much better use of time every step of the way, and for a web site that is the product of inspired design, not remedial design.

Step 12: Web Site Design Never Ends

You should be constantly testing, refining, improving, and expanding your site. Beyond testing initial functionality of your website, testing such as A/B testing for different landing pages geared toward different buyer personas is a good place to start.

Blog often, and every time you return to your site, try to think of one small thing to improve on a page or the site itself. If you mark what you changed and when you changed it, you might be able to track these changes against web traffic or visitor behavior.

Always remember: Websites that aren't growing, are simply dying.

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AdVenture Explores the Industrial Marketing and Sales Relationship

Fri, Aug 19, 2016 @ 03:17 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Web Design Company, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Internet Development, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Marketing, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Website Design Company, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Web Design

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(This week's guest post is from Scott Costa, Publisher, tED magazine. We weren't able to go to AdVenture this year but it's the best industrial marketing conference for the electrical manufacturing and distribution industry. Our Creative Guide is from a presentation we gave at 2004's conference.  We just got the 8-19-2016 NAED eNews with this article featured.)

The 2016 NAED AdVenture Conference brought together about 140 marketing professionals in the same room.

And one sales professional.

Industrial Marketing bla bla bla

John Lorince from Leff Electric was in the company's marketing department, but moved to an outside sales position. His presentation drew the most questions and comments of the entire AdVenture Conference. By far. 

There were the obvious jokes about sales people being from the "Evil Empire" or "The Dark Side." But Lorince really put a lot of what marketing does into perspective by saying, "Some of what I thought was important, wasn't," when talking about his time in the marketing department. He also asked the marketing crowd how often they go on sales calls, and the answer was an overwhelming "once in a while."  Lorince believes it should be more than that. On the flip side, you have to wonder how many times a salesperson attended a marketing meeting or conference. Perhaps joining the two groups together a little more often would help bridge the communications gap.

Lorince added that it is extremely important for the marketing team to treat him like the customer. "Sell the products to me, so I can sell them to someone else," he advises. He also said he appreciates it when a member of the marketing team makes quick visits to his office to work with him on sales or special pricing, because in the long run it will make his job easier.

Lorince did a great job of providing a series of tips to the marketing people at the AdVenture Conference. So great that, before he finished, he was asked to mark his calendar to come back next year and address the group again.

His speech is really a great start to a very old problem. On one side, you have a marketing department that is using research, product knowledge, and concepts that set buying your products apart from the competition as an advantage. On the other side, you have sales people using research (like past history in successful selling), product knowledge, and concepts for setting himself apart from any other salesperson from another company to use as an advantage. So why are the two departments so far apart?

I tracked down some quotes from experts on B2B practices outside of electrical distribution, to find where they are seeing failures between marketing and sales. They are worth reading to see if you are experiencing the same situations. For example, Stephanie Tilton of Savvy B2B Marketing says, "Many corporate cultures don't support a meeting of the minds between sales and marketing. And without the support of upper management, any valiant attempts to close the gap will fizzle out. Whereas marketing often revolves around a campaign schedule, sales is sweating to meet quota."

Jennifer Beever or New Incite believes the problem between sales and marketing is traditional, and that tradition needs to end. "Traditional departments operate in silos, with each performing their function but not interacting with others. On one hand, too many marketing departments believe they need to operate autonomously, with input from sales. On the other hand, too many salespeople take a ‘maverick' approach, and don't give marketing credit for generating leads," Beever says.

This is an interesting topic, especially as we are seeing significant changes to our supply chain, including innovative new products being launched and the significant impact mergers and acquisitions have already had on our distributors and suppliers.  We have assigned our writers to take an even deeper look into this, and tedmag.com will be building stories to help you bridge the gap between sales and marketing.

We also hope John Lorince accepts the invitation to come back to AdVenture next year. We can all use more insight from people like him.  Maybe he can get even more salespeople to come with him.


Contact us today for a free, no obligation consultation.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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Why Great Web Design & Web Development Never Ends

Tue, Aug 16, 2016 @ 10:00 AM / by Myke Amend posted in Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Web Design Company, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Internet Development, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Marketing, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Website Design Company, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Featured, Web Design

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Your new web design or web development project is finished... or is it?

Web Design GraphicIn a sense, maybe your web design or web redesign project is coming to a close. You've covered everything that is within scope, satisfied every need that was laid out in the project planning, web design quote, or purchase order. The end of project meeting answered all remaining questions, employees were trained on how to use and manage their new website, and it looks like you can call this a job well done and *finally!* launch your new corporate website.

From here, ideally, your new site will impress visitors, generate new leads, make sales, and yield much better search results. You finally have a site that is well-optimized for search by today's standards, including being responsive/mobile-friendly. You even made sure to make it a secure (HTTPS/SSL) site.

Yep, your site is completely, at this very moment, modern and will serve you well for 2 to 5 years, until you need to completely replace it again, as business from the site begins to slow, and visitor counts dwindle...

and when that time comes, you may wonder...

"Our last web design is only a few years old, why is this happening?"

Here are some of the most common reasons a great website can fail over time:

Website Missed Maintenance Issues:

Like all business equipment, from large industrial machinery, to company cars, to copiers, websites need to be maintained to retain value. Most companies wouldn't let their vehicles go a year without changing the oil, but many companies allow their websites go to seed, creating a cycle of time and revenue lost for need of emergency patches, leading eventually into the need for a complete replacement.

  • Regular maintenance can help keep your site up to date with today's SEO standards. It is much harder (and more costly) to recover lost search position than it is to maintain and improve the ranking of your web site. Losing revenue all the way up to that point makes this decision even less affordable.
  • Regular maintenance can defend against hacks, malware, blackhat SEO and other factors that might harm your ranking. Regaining ranking after your web site loses search placement and is indexed with a "this site may be harmful to your computer", is often extremely difficult, and costly. Regaining placement lost to spammers and black hat SEO is also difficult.
  • Regular Maintenance can keep your web presence in all available markets. As new devices are created and released, as monitor sizes increase or shrink, as screen resolutions become sharper, as internet speeds increase, as devices from servers to smart watches become faster - you should want your web site design to be accessible to as many people on as many devices as possible. Regularly look in on your website, from multiple devices, and try to always consider devices that you may be leaving out.
  • Regular Maintenance can allow you to detect and fix broken links, broken contact forms, and other lost functionality before you lose business from it. Sometimes web hosts upgrade their software, or tighten up their security. This can cause a site to break. You do not know the web host made changes to the environment. Your web host does not know that your site or some part of your site broke as a result. Often, by the time a potential customer contacts a company about a broken website, or broken web page, weeks, even months have gone by. In this time, hundreds of other visitors have simply gone elsewhere. The question "How long has this been broken?", can lead to revelations about business slowdown you do not want to have.
  • Great sites come from evolution, not as pre-packaged solutions. Fully replacing an old site can be necessary if too much time has passed since the last time it was worked on, but the best very sites are sites that are regularly retuned and refined to keep up with current needs and standards. You invested a lot of money in your new build. Maintenance could mean no more major rebuilds, less cost over time, and much better results.

 

example of a fully mobile responsive design for all devices
Example of a website designed for widescreen, desktop, laptop, tablet, and cell phone.

 

Website Disuse issues:

Inbound Marketing is one of the most important aspects of good Web DesignThis mistake, in recent times of Wordpress and other types of CMS (Content Management Systems) being the standard, in more-recent times of search providers giving preference to regularly-updated sites, can be just as harmful as the former. As even the best equipment can become rusty when negelcted, so can your web presence.

  • Regular content updates help your search presence and can help your site-wide keyword saturation. Google, and other search engines prefer sites that they know are being maintained. Fresh content shows Google that the site is an actively growing site, not an abandoned site that is only still living because of pre-paid hosting, or that someone forgot to pull the plug. Since people who are searching are most-often in search of up-to-date information - search engines try to search up the most up-todate content and web sites.
  • Regular updates can extend the size of your site, and build its footprint on the web. Whether you are blogging, adding new pages, or extending the content of existing pages (perhaps breaking content up into more subpages), you are gaining more chances to be indexed and seen, building keywords for your site, expanding the size of your net.
  • Stasis is death. While your site is not growing - your competitors sites may be. Worse: while you are failing to build new links to your site, you are most likely losing links as well. Backlinks are still the number one factor in determining search ranking. As sites, pages, and articles that were linking to you disappear, are edited, or are archived, you are losing inbound links. Companies that are regularly building links tend not to notice, but when you stop building, these losses are hard to ignore.
  • Disuse IS Misuse. If you are not using your website as an effective marketing tool, it becomes only about as handy as a business card or a listing in the whitepages. If customers need to already know you exist in order to find your web site, you might as well be sticking to brochures and pamphlets. A good inbound marketing campaign identifies visitors, turns visitors into leads, and nurtures leads into happy customers.
  • Without a good marketing plan, clicks and visits are merely numbers. Purchasing ads online and in print are great ways to bring visitors to your site. Mailers, magazine advertising, eNewsletter advertising, directory placements, technical articles, and advertorials are also great ways to drive traffic. If you are doing these things, but have no marketing strategy and no marketing automation in place for your website, you are simply wasting your advertising dollars and efforts.

If your company does not have its own marketing staff, if you do not have your own staff of net technicians, web developers, or graphic designers, Lohre and Associates can help with your short term or long term marketing and web development needs.

If you would like to save money on coordinating advertising efforts between multiple advertising and marketing services, Lohre and Associates would love to help. As Cincinnati's full-service industrial advertising and marketing agency, we do it all.

Contact us today for a free, no obligation consultation.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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Great Test-Pectations - Mining Equipment Marketing

Fri, Aug 05, 2016 @ 02:37 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Advertising, Content Creation, Content Marketing

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(This week's post is a recent article we wrote for POWDER BULK SOLIDS on a major factor in mining equipment marketing - trying before you buy! Thanks to Stedman Machine Company for the opportunity to work with them to create one of the finest marketing programs I've been a part of in my nearly 40 years in the business. Lohre also took the photos.)

Learn why it’s smart to try before you buy size reduction equipment.

By Chris Nawalaniec, Vice President of Sales & Marketing, Stedman Machine Company

Why Test?

Selecting the right equipment is also a great way to save energy. Sure you could use a carpenter’s hammer to drive a railroad spike, but it is not very efficient, and while a sledgehammer is more common, an automatic spike driver can make the task nearly effortless. However if you are only driving a single spike, the additional energy required using the automatic option becomes cost prohibitive. A review of your material and process by the equipment manufacturer can help you avoid the pitfalls of under or over selection.

Mining-Equipment-Marketing-8-5-16.3.jpg(Stedman Machine Company photo of closed size reduction circuit system with the Stedman Grand Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactor and a round vibratory screener.)

Testing helps determine the most efficient processing technology to meet production needs. The right equipment saves time and money in the long run. Full-scale testing provides precise size reduction solutions for the exact material/s and demonstration of a specific model before purchase.

While the nuances of size reduction are infinite, commonly encountered industrial size reduction applications use equipment that achieves reduction through one or more of the following:

  • Impact -- hitting a friable material to break large parts into smaller ones
  • Shear -- tearing or ripping material
  • Compression -- squeezing and pressing down on a material until it breaks.

Design parameters that drive size reduction crusher selection include production requirements, material characteristics, project location, climate conditions, capital cost, safety and environment, the life of product/expansion plans and maintenance requirements.

Some types of machinery can last decades. Buying the wrong equipment can have long-term consequences in the cost of consumables, lack of production and downtime. Yearly consumables alone could exceed half the cost of the unit. Size- reduction equipment is typically integrated into a large system. By choosing the wrong equipment, it could inadvertently create a bottleneck that affects the productivity of the overall system.

Test facilities have hundreds of reports on file that may match your application. Saving the expenses of preliminary testing or in the selection of the proper size reduction method. Frequently the staff has experience crushing your material or a similar material. New applications are compared to existing reference data for similar applications. Past tests provide valuable insight into how to configure equipment and plan tests.

Picking the right test facility

Simple devices like the mortar and pestle and technologically complex machines like giant mining crushers perform the same basic task: making big things smaller. Finding the right equipment for this critical process step should begin with the question, “Do we need size reduction equipment, knowledge, or both?”

Choose a test facility that has a range of different size reduction methods. A full complement of hoppers, mechanical conveyors and screens enable test plant technicians to replicate both open and closed systems. Full-size crushing equipment is best for dependable results. It is difficult to scale up crushing results from a lab-size crusher. Lab machine tests may not determine the actual horsepower and machine size the project requires. 

Is the test plant set up to provide real-world conditions in which customers can view their materials being processed -- from feeding, through size reduction and discharge/separation? Does it have an open slot to allow for the installation of other machines on an as-needed basis? Are there cameras to provide live video feeds of materials as they are being processed?

Once the testing is done, toll processing, in the same facility, can produce enough product to test downstream processes, such as briquetting and extrusion, in the future facility to ensure that the process will perform as expected. Remember, the goal is to find an application solution rather than simply buying equipment.

Mining-Equipment-Marketing-8-5-16.1.jpg(Stedman Machine Company photo of open size reduction circuit system with the Stedman Grand Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactor and a round vibratory screener.)

What the test plant needs to know

Size reduction process design begins with an understanding of the feed’s physical and chemical characteristics and ends with the product’s physical specifications and other unique product considerations. Five things are needed to evaluate testing possibilities:

  • Feed size
  • Moisture content
  • Tons-per-hour capacity required
  • Final product size
  • Safety data sheets

A material with high moisture content may become gummy and build up on the inside of the crusher. Moisture has a cushioning effect and can cause the material to stick together reducing productivity. When material buildup is a concern, the addition of equipment heaters and air cannons can be used to reduce build up allowing for more efficient operation. Brittle materials are easily crushed, but the process may create too many fines. Heat-sensitive materials may need cooling systems. 

Getting the material to the test facility may be a problem. Can the consistency of the material change during shipping to the test plant? Can the facility restore your material to its as-shipped condition? For typical tests about 200 to 500 pounds of material are required.

What to expect during the test

First steps are sampling of the raw feed to establish the input gradation, moisture level and creating a plan for crushing tests specific to the project goals. To achieve the desired particle size and consistency, the test facility will consider: particle size distribution (the percentage of lumps versus fines) as it enters the crusher, feed control (Will it become gummy or sticky?) and how material is taken away from the crusher. If the material has a large percentage of fines, it’s more efficient to separate the fines with a screener first. Only the oversized material goes through the crusher.

Plan to spend a few days observing the testing process and all the procedures necessary to produce the required end product including preparation, loading of your material and RPM sets for fine to coarse production. You’ll witness the real-time horsepower consumption through start up and full load.

Test plants are operated in either open or closed circuit. Open circuit means the material passes through the crusher once. Closed circuit means that material is re-circulated back into the crusher if it doesn’t pass through a certain screen mesh. In closed circuits, as much as 30 percent of material may re-circulate before meeting size requirements, which increases energy use by 30 percent.

If needed, the test facility will run your material through various crushing methods and/or determine how to fine tune the crusher’s configuration for your process. Two different type crushers may effectively reduce your material at the specifications you need, but one may require much less horsepower and less cost to operate.

Mining Equipment Toll Processing(Stedman Machine Company photo provided of closed, air-swept size reduction circuit system with a Stedman Vertical Roller Mill.)

The report

The data produced from the test of your material helps estimate operating costs from power consumption to wear parts and the information needed to select the right crushing and size reduction equipment. The written technical report provided to you will include the following:

  • Raw feed particle size distribution
  • Moisture content analysis
  • Product particle size distribution gradation analysis
  • Bulk density analysis before and after crushing
  • Abrasion Test to determine if an impactor is feasible for a particular application and to estimate hammer wear life.
  • Power requirements for startup and operation

Evaluating results and scale up

Performance data obtained on test plant equipment are scalable to accurately predict outcomes achieved on production models. Once your tests are done, the sales engineer will make recommendations for equipment type and size, open or closed circuits and other equipment like air cannons or heaters to loosen caking or sticky material. The equipment selected should produce the same particle size distribution as the test unit and the energy required at the production throughput rate is scalable from the test equipment.

Size reduction expressed in the simplest form is: “Material + Energy = Size Reduction.” Experienced, knowledgeable size reduction equipment suppliers will guide a customer through the correct questions and recommend the best-suited method for any specific materials. Reputable suppliers will refer customers to other equipment manufacturers with better-suited styles of equipment when their products are not suited to the application.

In conclusion, following these simple steps when and where you define your product and process, perform testing and consider your installation, you will succeed in buying a crusher that will provide years of trouble-free processing.

Stedman Machine Company, 129 Franklin Street, Aurora, IN 4001, 812-926-0038; www.stedman-machine.com, sales@stedman-machine.com 

About the author

Chris Nawalaniec is Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Stedman Machine Company, the Aurora, Ind.-based manufacturer of size reduction equipment and systems, founded in 1834. Nawalaniec graduated from the University of Cincinnati (BSME, MBA) and has more than 30 years professional experience in size reduction and particle size separation. Nawalaniec oversees new machinery and system sales, as well as the full-service test plant that has been operating at Stedman for more than 90 years. (Read Chris' mining equipment marketing testimonial.)

About Stedman Machine Company

Stedman Machine Company works closely with its customers to determine the best, most cost-effective, efficient size reduction method and equipment for specific applications. Stedman’s line of equipment includes: Cage Mills, Grand Slam™ and Mega Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactors, V-Slam™ Vertical Shaft Impactors, Hammer Mills, Aurora Lump Breakers, Micro-Max™ and Vertical Roller Mill Air Swept Fine Grinders. Stedman operates a complete testing and toll processing facility staffed by experienced technicians with full-scale equipment, allowing customers to witness accurate crushing test results, predicted output capacities and processing data. Support services include system design and 24-hour parts and service


Cincinnati's Full-service Industrial Advertising Agency

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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