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Moonshot Thinking & the Age of Innovation

Tue, Mar 15, 2016 @ 01:18 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Literature Design, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature Design, Design Agency, Ad Design

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Wed, 03/09/2016 - by Kaylie Duffy, Associate Editor, @kaylieannduffy

This blog originally appeared in the March 2016 issue of Product Design & Development.

Kaylie_Duffy_headshot_small_3.jpgThe media often portrays the present world as a war-torn planet on its way to self-destruction. Images of poverty, disease, violence, and civil unrest often fill our T.V. screens when we turn on the nightly news.

With all the negative imagery we see on a daily basis, it may come as a surprise to find out that the Earth and its inhabitants are actually getting progressively healthier, safer, and more educated.

Peter Diamandis, XPrize Foundation CEO, reiterated this point throughout his keynote speech at SolidWorks World 2016 in early February.

A multitude of students, engineers, designers, and hobbyists crowded into the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in downtown Dallas to hear the engineer, physician, and entrepreneur explain how technology is turning areas of scarcity into abundance.

“It’s my pleasure to talk about the implications of exponential technologies, and the realization that in this room are sitting the minds that are going to be creating the future,” began Diamandis.

He explained that the news media preferentially feeds its viewers negative stories, because that is what most minds pay attention to. In fact, an ancient sliver of the temporal lobe called the amygdala acts as an early warning detector. It scans everything humans hear and see for anything that may be harmful.

So, given the array of news stories watched and read throughout the day, most individuals will preferentially focus on the negative news. But according to data presented by Diamandis, the world is actually in an extraordinary place.

“Over the last 100 years, the per capita income for every nation on this planet has more than tripled,” explained Diamandis. “The human lifespan has more than doubled, the cost of food has dropped 13-fold, energy has dropped 20-fold, transportation [has dropped] hundreds-of-folds, and communication [has dropped] thousands-of-folds.”

Therefore, if we take the time to examine the numerical evidence for abundance, it is quite incredible.

Peter Diamandis. Image credit: SolidWorks
Diamandis presented a number of graphs throughout his keynote, explaining that airplane accidents are almost nonexistent, while automobile-related deaths are reducing yearly. Another eye-opening graph showed how the annual global death rate due to natural disasters is declining.

“Look how this has dropped as we’ve put assets into space to view the Earth; as we’ve gotten better sensors and networks with the ability to actually predict natural disasters before they happen and get help to individuals in that golden hour,” said Diamandis.

Why is this happening? Why are we creating this extraordinary world of abundance?

According to the XPrize CEO, it’s a direct result of the exponential technologies we’re creating and the financial ease of creating startups in the present day.

“Back in 2000, the cost of the bandwidth, the servers, the software, the people was $5 million dollars to get a startup going,” mused Diamandis. “Today after [Amazon Web Services], after open source, we’re down to $5,000.”

Because the former prohibitive cost of launching a startup has dramatically dropped, the number of entrepreneurs, engineers, and innovators creating the technology of the future is radically increasing. Plus, the bright minds of today are using better tools to build better tools, which in turn build better tools.

In 2010, the average thousand-dollar computer was running at about 100 billion (1011) calculations per second, which is more computational power than the entire U.S. space program had in the 1960s and ‘70s. However, seven years from now in 2023, the average thousand-dollar computer will run at 1016 calculations per second.

View more: Top 5 from SolidWorks World 2016

“[That’s] just a number. Unless you speak to a neurophysiologist, who says, ‘That’s the rate at which your brain and my brain does pattern recognition,’” said Diamandis. “Twenty-five years later, now a thousand bucks buys you the computational power of the entire human race.”

The point that Diamandis was making is that faster, cheaper computational power is the bedrock on top of which the Internet of Things, robotics, 3D printing, synthetic biology, artificial intelligence (AI), and a variety of other technologies are progressing.

In addition, the planet now has more connected individuals than ever before.

“[The planet’s population] just crossed the seven billion mark. We’re on a rampage to make people healthier and better educated,” explained Diamandis. “Back in 2010, we had 1.8 billion people connected on planet Earth. Today, we’re about 2.9 billion. The low estimate by 2020 is that we’ll go to 5 billion connected minds.”

The 5 billion new minds coming online will lead to a massive increase in innovation, representing tens of trillions of dollars flowing into the global economy. Due to the abundance of improved technology and increased connectivity, Diamandis believes that we can take part in moonshot thinking.

“Today, you have the ability to be audacious... to take your grandest dreams and make them true,” he mused. “Moonshot thinking is the ability to go ten times bigger, rather than ten percent bigger.”

Startups can now start with a clean sheet of paper, using the best design tools, the best robotics, the best AI, and the best materials. And when you approach a project with this clean sheet of paper, you can create a product that is ten times better.

“Today any of us who wants to solve a problem – to use the tools of design to take what’s in your mind and manifest it – can,” explained Diamandis. “We’re living during the most extraordinary time in human history.”

Email Kaylie.Duffy@advantagemedia.com.

Kaylie Duffy
Associate Editor
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Mobile-Friendly Website Design with an Image-Based Menu

Mon, Jan 25, 2016 @ 09:16 AM / by Myke Amend posted in Internet Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Website Design, B2B Advertising, Internet Design and Development, Graphic Design, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Cincinnati Advertising, Internet Development, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Advertisement Design, Cincinnati Website Design, Advertising Agency, Web Design

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When Lohre and Associates began this project, Roto-Disc, Inc. had a standard HTML web site that they liked, as much as we did, for a number of good reasons:

  • It was built to reflect the look and feel of Roto-Disc's product catalog about as closely as could be done with a website. It matched Roto-Disc's catalogue so very well that the site itself felt like well-designed and well-planned literature.
  • Pages were designed, not as a whole in cookie-cutter fashion, but for their purpose. Much like a printed brochure, everything was cohesively-branded as one well-collected work - yet each individual page was custom-tailored to best-present the products and services on that page.
  • The existing outline was near-perfect. Divisions between pages and topics were pretty spot-on, easy to navigate and easy to follow.

Web Design for Rotodisc CincinnatiAbove: The standard HTML site that was.

It was however, as sites made years ago tend to be: static in size and format, with no mobile menus or even alternate mobile version, and no CMS or other way to dynamically-generate new content - all of which we know to be a problem today for these reasons:

  • Google now gives better indexing for mobile-friendly sites, and penalizes sites that do not have mobile-friendly design or versions.
  • Engineers and other decision-makers in the Process Industry cannot easily view these sites while they are out in the field, which is about the time that needs for new equipment tend to arise or happen to be revealed.
  • Sites not viewed by mobile users do not get shared by mobile users, who make up for an increasingly-large percentage of internet viewers.
  • Sites that are blogs, WIKIS, or otherwise CMS-driven, have a sizable SEO advantage over most sites that are not. Growing content and fostering inbound links are incredibly-important to SEO. Blogs also enable a company to position itself as an industry leader, and give them the tools to build and maintain better customer relationships.

Another need to consider was that Roto-Disc's Product line would soon be expanding. In addition to the Heavy-Duty Spherical Valves, Lighter-Weight Spherical Valves, Sanitary Spherical valves, Inflatable Seal Spherical Valves, Heavy-Duty Clean Flow Diverters, and Airlock/Double-Dump Valves Roto-Disc already had a new section for Flange Adaptors, Wedge Inserts, and Stub Adaptors that needed to fit into the current image-based menu. Soon Roto-Disc would need to also add Process Transitions, and Splitters/Convergers, as well as the Flange Adaptors to this small swatch of internet real-estate.

From This We Created A Short List of Initial Project Goals:

  • Emulate the general look and feel of Roto-Disc's catalog, which we had recently updated for the new product line.
  • Preserve the image-based menu and allow for more menu items to be added.
  • Make their site completely responsive and mobile-friendly.
  • Make navigating and reading the site easy for *all* sizes: large screens, smartphones, *and* tablets.
  • Build it as a CMS (Wordpress in this case) for blogging, scaleable SEO, Inbound Marketing, and ease of content editing.
  • Include the best SEO plugins available so that the SEO approach can be updated for new search rules and algorithms.

Which Enabled Us to Build This List of Challenges:

  • The new catalog was rich with very in-depth charts for most every product. Some of these would require tables with at least 15 columns. Large tables are very difficult to display on mobile devices and harder still to display in a size and format that is easy to read and does not require scrolling or turning the device to horizontal view.
  • We wanted the image-based menu to look good on desktop systems, and did not want to lose it to a simple mobile menu at tablet and mobile sizes.
  • The image-based menu would require dropdowns so that viewers would have direct access to the spefic product information they were looking for.
  • We needed dropdown menus to work for desktop, laptop, tablet, and smartphones. Since touch devices do not have a hover state for links, we needed to make the menu expand and contract when clicked, not moused over. This was a major consideration when it came to tablet users, because the image would present somewhat like the desktop version, but with no mouseover capabilities.
  • We wanted to preserve the image menus even in the mobile version if possible.
  • Having "sticky" always-on-top navigation is always nice when it comes to desktops and laptops - We wanted to find a way to do this for both the header and standard navigation, as well as the image navigation. We wanted to do this without these items completely consuming the available viewport. We also wanted the sticky image menu to not be sticky on tablets because of limited space.
  • For tablet users who would lose this sticky navigation, we needed alternatives, such as an easy way to return to the navigation and/or adding navigation also to the footer of the pages.

Our Solutions:

Web Design /Website Design for RotoDisc Cincinnati

Wide-open: The site design is based on the Brochure, but made for web, driven by Wordpress, with an image menu plugin for ease of editing the image-based menu.

Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

An Additional Consideration: For Desktop users, the image links display an instruction when moused over, letting them know that clicking will open and close the submenu (though the submenu will go also away on its own when no longer in focus).

Mobile-friendly Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

The benefits of using a plugin and not hard-coding this aspect: All of the above menu and Submenu items can be added, removed, or edited through the control panel.

Mobile-friendly Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc, Cincinnati

Two Sticky Menus in motion: The Image menu slides up onto the header when the page is scrolled, and stays - leaving the most important items of both sets of navigation always at the top of the screen for easy access.

Mobile version of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Not so sticky: On smaller-sized screens not quite small-enough for the mobile menu the image menu items switch size to fall into three rows of three icons. The menu no longer sticks at the top so that content can be seen when scrolling.

Web Design / Website Design Tables for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Large Tables: These charts do not seem like they will fit well on a smaller screen... especially not on mobile, not even in landscape aspect. What can be done?

Mobile width view of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

AHA! Jquery to the rescue: By rotating the table header text 90% and re-scaling those cells accordingly, we have a LOT more space to work with when presenting these tables on mobile devices. No scrolling necessary. Some strategic line-breaking in the product number column and Viola!

Mobile width view 2 of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

The Mobile Menu: It seems as though the image menu has been lost... and that would be sad. ... but we can do better!

Mobile width view of Nav menu for Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Huzzah!: There is that image menu again, not lost afterall.

Mobile menu of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

The "Open/Close" Instructions: They are pointless here, because you cannot mouseover on a tablet or other mobile device, but they won't be seen for this reason. Plus: They are still handy if you like keeping your browser window very small.

Mobile menu view for Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Tricky: Submenus on an image menu in a mobile menu. I can't think of any place I have seen this before - actually *many* aspects of this project were something completely new.

Mobile width view 3 of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Falling in line: Divs and most tables break apart - images set themselves to fill the viewport, and horizontal content becomes vertical in order to keep images large enough to view, also keeping text from being crammed awkwardly on the smaller screen.

Below: You'll notice the menu does not stick to the top in mobile view. Sticky menus on mobile, especially for sites with many pages, are not a good idea. If the menu extends beyond the viewport, and does not scroll - then the only part of the menu that can be accessed is the part at the top of the screen. This will leave visitors stuck and incredibly frustrated. You can in some cases make another scrollbar just for the navigation, but if it is not seen visitors will think they have arrived at a broken site and move on.

Mobile width view 4 of Web Design / Website Design for Rotodisc Cincinnati

Guide to Web Site Redesign by Cincinnati Website Design Company, Lohre & Associates

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Water Efficiency:  Reader Survey, Industrial Marketing Review

Tue, Oct 06, 2015 @ 03:54 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Marketing, Advertising, Advertising Design, Advertisement Design, print advertising, Advertising Agency

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Verizon - Very good ad with a real life photo of truckers. The message is a classic Call-To-Action with an eBook to download. Very well done.


Another great ad. Very clear headline, good photo and the copy gets right to the point about the guarantee. Directs folks to their booth and even social sharing buttons.


Starts out great with a clear metaphor of the dual nature of their business but then the copy says nothing except for a few buzz words. Sure it's pretty much impossible to actually use a testimonial but I would like to have one. At least an actual problem solution that demonstrates their capabilities would be better. With real numbers and real results.


It's very hard to have an attention getting ad without a human or an animal in it. It would have been better to put a fish in the glass. What is chlorsulfonated polyethylene? It's an honest question this ad should answer.

 
I take it back what I said about Burke. This ad is informative and doesn't have an animal in it. Good invitation to the product launch and a convincing story. A lot packed into a small package but it works. Good job, Crane.


Oh boy, "Settle the Fuck Down!" It's not even a metaphor for their process. Or so complicated I don't get it. Great photo and an easy to understand process that replaces flocculant. Why not explain it? They start in the fine print.


A branding ad with the name in the headline. Why waste the space? What does Aerostrip mean? Air-O-Strip? Strip-O-Air would be better. The copy begs for some actual detail about how it saves money and time. Is the floor mounting patented? 


If you can't say anything but your name at least show some projects. Some capacities or details of the photos would be nice.


Everything works great. I'd just like to know the guy's name and contact info, I'm ready to learn more. The promised application examples aren't on their web site.


Good information for applications. I guess the ad is dual purpose for manufacturing ideas and for membership. Pick one or the other, if you can.


What's the use of such a milk toast ad? Like logos on a Nascar? At least BASF had a slogan, "We don't make the products, we make them better." Better off using the cost of this ad to sponsor industry association meetings. They could use it. At least their local rep could get up and say a few words.


Nice informative ad. I like the story they tell and the clear product definition and illustration.


Good basic product ad. Begs to be online with the video link. I thought I was going to get a good demonstration but instead I got a long funky web page. Still don't understand how it eliminates a welded flange.

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Industrial Marketing Review 3-2015 Foundry Management & Technology Ads

Sun, Apr 19, 2015 @ 11:41 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Advertising, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, print advertisements, Advertising Agency

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Didion Advertising DesignDiDion Advertising Design 2 
Very good ad with four excellent testimonials. Good information but they didn't have to go negative with "Competition relies on hype, bogus claims and negative scare tactics."
 

Mold Handling Ad Design
Very good ad that matches the copy claims with the montage of images. If you recognized your facility, they have the equipment for you.
 

Iko Advertisement design
This is just a line card ad of the material list they supply. I wish they would have touched on at least one benefit for each product. They could have been tied to the montage of images, they illustrate the products' usage.
 

FSD Advertising DesignAdvertisement Design by FSD 
A little disappointed with the waste of space in this two page spread. Forget the flags on the second page and tie some location and result to the seven images on page one.
 

Advertisement Design for Vibra-Drum 
Good information in the copy but wasted space by using just about the same view for a large and small image. Better to use one and make it a cut-away that pointed out some of the benefit features.
 

Efficient Advertising Design
Liked everything about this ad except for the headline, "Efficient, Reliable and Advanced." It would be better to tie a specific testimonial benefit to them like, 125% Efficient, 110% Uptime and 65% Energy Savings. The copy can back up the headline claims.
 

Ad Design for GIFA 
Typical show ad. There must be something visual they could use instead of an illustrated globe. Industrial times are much better so maybe they could tout the record breaking increase in technical presentations, exhibitors and attendees? To quote the Director, Friedrich-Georg Kehrer, “In contrast to many capital goods trade fairs at other locations, there is no sign of a decline of any kind at our four trade fairs. The four events hold an almost unrivalled position anywhere in the world. Düsseldorf is the only place where companies reach the entire global market and this is vital for their business operations.”
 

Advertising Design for EC&S 
Everything is good about this ad except for the order and the headline. Quote some customer saying, "They Engineered a Solution and Built it Too." Put that at the top, with a follow up subhead, the photos and at the end the logo and signature. Focus on the service and not the source.
 

Ad Design for Foundry Technology 
One of the best ads but the headline is a real bummer. Maybe, "Four Ways to Ask Us to Set Your Equipment or Concept-To-Completion!"
 

Advertising Design for Hunter
Great ad, wish they had the budget to make it a full page. It wouldn't look so crowded and hard to read if it was on a white field.

Advertising made Creepy 
The secret to a good ad is to associate a common, memorable metaphor that reminds a reader about your unique sales proposition. I'm not sure about this metaphor. You have to create ads that the sales guys will like to use to get their point across. Passing out rubber gloves won't get the kind of attention you're looking for. Maybe get permission to use Norman Rockwell's illustration of the family physician checking the little girl's doll with the headline, "Checkups Even For Your Dreams."
 

Solutions Advertisement
The Ask ads are always top notch. Just wish they could say something coming from that engineer's mouth. Like, "Take a Close Look at How Much You Can Save With Our Solutions."
 

Sinto Advertisement
Begs for a testimonial. What am I looking at? Please point out the features that deliver durability, reliability and production.
 

Advertisement for Ajax TOCCO 
Good content but you can't communicate anything if you don't get their attention and the only way you can do that is to speak to the reader personally. I'd use one of their engineers to be in the ad and make a statement about customer service.
 
Heavy Duty Advertisement 
What does that illustration have to do with the lame headline anyway? Maybe it will come to me later but that's not the point in an ad. I'd use a 3D illustration of their equipment and focus on one industry's material running through it. Oh, now I get it. It's a rave, the machine jumped onto the floor and is body surfing the crowd.
 

First Step Advertisement 
Great copy. Please, just let an intern be the spokesperson, "At XYZ Company I learned to ask for advice and then think for myself." Isn't that the type of employee you're looking for?
 
Advertising for Cor-Met
No need to duplicate the company name in the headline and signature. The packaging and metals tell the story, maybe put them together, if that will help catch a eye.
 

Creative Advertising 
Great ad. "The brain takes just 33 milliseconds-three hundredths of a second, or a tenth of a time it takes to blink-to decide whether someone is to be trusted," could be worked into the message and be more powerful.
 

Inverter Advertising
I'm dying to see a stop action illustration of this but the device is pretty self evident. Great ad but I can't read the company's name.

Foundry Advertising 
Good quarter page ad. Don't change a thing.
 

Advertisement for Fosco 
There must be something more interesting those engineers said than that. From their site, "dedicated teams strategically positioned across the globe." So, "Our Technical Staff in Guangdong Can Visit Your Plant Tomorrow."
 

 If you liked this post you may like, "How to Write an Industrial Marketing Telemarketing Script."


Download our free guide to Creative Marketing Communications,

Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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Rocking Industrial Marketing Advertisements

Mon, Jan 06, 2014 @ 10:33 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Technical llustration, Industrial Marketing Advertising, Business to Consumer Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Business to Consumer Advertising, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, Advertising Agency

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How do you break through the clutter? Literally. That's our problem as we commence a new campaign for the mining business. Here'a a peek behind the creative process.

Art Dickinson Industrial PhotographyAt first we thought some great photography of their employees would stop everyone on the page. Photos of people are always effective in that respect. Even if the person's face is no larger than a postage stamp, eye-tracking software proves it makes viewers stop and look. But we're not the only creatives to note that -- it's why there are (reliably) a dozen or so such ads in every industry pub. Besides, trying to get the client to use employees is difficult. Conventional wisdom holds you don't want to promote employees for fear that they will want more money. Or worse, letting them get the idea they're indispensible. Testimonials from customers are better but don't hold your breath if your under deadline. Photo courtesy Art Dickinson Photography.

Creative Commons Industrial MarketingWhat are some other, stop-you-dead-in-your-tracks visual attention getters? Babies, dogs and scantily clad women tend to work for the roughneck set, but we don't care to go there. Recently we got involved in using Inventor and Light Wave to produce some 3D technical drawings of equipment. It inspired us to think about using the technology to use a cutaway of the machine and show how it operates. Then the question is: Does an overall picture of the machine tell the viewer instantly what the machine is good for? It's sort of like looking at a sports car versus a dumptruck. If you're selling either and the viewer is looking for that product, they will look at your ad. That's why a product line ad illustrating your product range, is normally a safe idea. Not particulary attention-getting, and actually very boring.

Thanks to Creative Commons for the photo.

Industrial marketing illlustrationSo what about an extreme closeup? Showing the technical details of how the machine works? If so, how would you make that interesting? There's a new smartphone app, Ateva, that allows you to look at a two-dimensional page and up pops a 3D object. The app is programed to identify the photo and then serve the 3D image through your tablet or smartphone. The viewer can move the phone around the page and see the different angles of the 3D illustration. We think that this just might be the ticket to getting attention. Thanks to Powder Bulk Engineering magazine for the image on the left, which could be very entertaining to rotate and zoom in on. We particularly like including a person in the illustration. But a machine cut-a-way is not personal enough to persuade. To persuade you need to strike the problem nerve.

rock and hard place 300x199What problem are you solving? What problem does the viewer have? It may not be the operation of the machine. In one recent example, the problem the customer had was the machine's size. Would it fit into the allowable space? "Between a rock and a hard place," could be a good headline for this example. And an illustration could be memorable and hopefully sharable, by poking some fun at it. A rock 'n' roll guitar plus a steel plate?  Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson paired with a diamond? On second thought, these ideas don't shock enough. The germ of a good idea is in here, contrasting items just have to tell the story of not fitting in. Or in this case, just fitting in. Thanks to Embracing My Journey for the photo.

In this example, the machine had a close fit in an underground mine. That's one of the reasons it couldn't be too tall -- it wouldn't fit in. How about a headless miner plus a punny header? "We're working hard to give you more headroom!" Or, "Let our Mega-Slam give you more headroom." The number one thing our client is known for is practical applications of these machines. This is a perfect example of that skill. If we can use the visual to tell these two stories, we'll have a home run. Practical knowledge, plus the right size for the huge capacity the customer wanted. "Fitting ten pounds in a five-pound bag,"


If you liked this post you may also like, "How to Create Emotional Marketing Communications."


Creative marketing communications

Download our free guide to Creative Marketing Communications,

Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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Review: "Designing B2B Brands" for industrial marketing, part 4

Tue, Sep 24, 2013 @ 10:47 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Literature Design, Promotional Brochure Design, Marketing Strategy, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Graphic Design, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertisement Design, Branding Agency, Cincinnati Branding, Graphic Design Agency, Branding

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 Section 1 > Brand Overview > Brand Purpose

More thoughts on "Designing B2B Brands: Branding lessons from Deloitte and 195,000 Brand Managers," by Carlos Martinez Onaindia and Brian Resnick who worked for Deloitte's Global Brand & Communications group, while writing the book. These reviews look at branding from the point of view of our clients who manufacture industrial products.

Good branding requires manufacturers to have a purpose. There are several kinds of purposes for manufacturers:

Industrial marketing Firefighters

Go to work and put out fires. Fundamental problems in the market and the product are being ignored. The problems will never go away and their competitors know it. This is typically illustrated by faulty product design and engineering that won't allow manufacturing improvements and economical line extension.



Industrial marketing cash cow
Treat the company as a cash cow. The company has a competitive advantage -- as long as the product can be sold, made, shipped and serviced economically -- there will be a large amount of cash that can be extracted. Decisions are only made to reduce the costs of making, shipping and servicing, not to create major new market products.

 

Industrial marketing polar bear

Struggle to evolve and stay ahead in a market that is disappearing. The only solution is to create a new business model for the new markets, nearly impossible for older companies, only with deep dives into world class emerging technology and leveraging inexpensive new internet marketing techniques. Requires reeducating upper management and then their leadership. Employee growth is prime objective. You'll find this in employee owned companies (Publix Super Markets Inc.). The most advanced, progressive and technologically creative manufacturing companies are this type. Some require more than 50 hours of continuing education by each employee and give opportunities to every employee that wants to grow, learn and take on more responsibility.

 

industrial marketing ants

Micro-managing organization with state-of-the-art HR departments. It may seem inhuman but these are the most effective multi-nationals. Everything is measured and feedback given. Likewise, advanced research, industrial intelligence, global economics and IT tools are available for employee growth and product development. From the day you are hired, you are told exactly how you will be judged and compensated; but also given the tools to achieve your Big Hairy Audacious Goals.

 

Industrial marketing tree
Center your company around a unique technology. As long as you can keep ahead of any competition and get a generous margin, you can stay in business. Companies like this sometimes both sell the equipment and sell the parts the equipment can produce. Businesses like this can have a wonderful technological advantage both in engineering and marketing. Their unique selling proposition is understood by employees and customers.

 

 Industrial marketing homo sapiens

An environmental sustainable purpose for a company would be to work with the environment -- manufacturing things from others' waste and your waste is raw material for another company's product. Metal foundries are an age old example of this type of continually recycling business purpose. Mother Nature does this continually and we are just beginning to understand how to mimic natural processes to do the same. Patagonia is a good example of this company type, "The Footprint Chronicles® examines Patagonia’s life and habits as a company. The goal is to use transparency about our supply chain to help us reduce our adverse social and environmental impacts – and on an industrial scale. We’ve been in business long enough to know that when we can reduce or eliminate a harm, other businesses will be eager to follow suit."

This isn't your Dad's industrial marketing

If you liked this blog post you might be interested in another post on how Lohre & Assoc. is implementing sucessuful marketing campaigns by focusing on using new internet tools to aquire prospects, convert them into customers and delight them with customer service.


lead gen ebook resized 125

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Sales Lead Generation Guide by Cincinnati Marketing Agency Lohre & Associates

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Great Industrial Marketing Ads

Tue, Jul 30, 2013 @ 03:09 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Construction Equipment Marketing, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, Advertising Agency

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As we were leafing through Monday's stack of trade pubs we found some ads we really liked and thought we'd share.

I didn%27t know, Eaton resized 600

Counterfit products cause a lot of problems in the electrical industry. This ad gets straight to the point and readers learn from those ads that quickly share a benefit. If it doesn't catch your eye with an intriguing message you won't notice it. Consequently, the advertiser won't get as much value from the placement.

Spool Proof, Southwire resized 600

Southwire has a big ad spend behind introducing a new wire management system. They'll need to keep that spending up, to change this part of the industry. Wire has come on a bunch of different size wooden spools forever. Good thing the industrial marketing advertising series is memorable and focuses on the benefit.

Quick, Vertiflo resized 600

Vertiflo has been running this ad for a decade. Why change it, it works. The header calls out the benefit and the photos identify what Vertiflo is "Quick" about.

The Art of Bending, Wilson Tool resized 600

We love hands (both for the human touch and abiity to attract attention). Bending technology is changing the production industry and we "believe" Wilson Tools devices actually bent this origami.

We Can, Reconyx resized 600

Using "you" in the head lends a human element.  That's followed by "we" in with capabilities. You know instantly that Reconyx is in the business of surveilance.

We Advertise, P&S resized 600

We love PUMPS & SYSTEMS and web site visitors tell us they love it too. Maybe it's a bit of the Caterpillar effect (you claim you saw a Caterpillar ad in a magazine even though there was no ad in the issue), but we like its simple copy treatment and straightforward benefit.

Last One Standing, Vactor resized 600

This is our favorite.  Who can't relate to emergency workers who rely on their equipment. From the headline treatment to the photo selection, everything works together to tell a benefitial industrial marketing story.

Gard N Post, Arlington resized 600

Double entendre in the headline is always clever if you can work your product name into your benefit.

Faster Than a Change, Plex resized 600

It took us a while to understand why we liked this ad. We kept reading and re-reading it, and that's exactly what's so powerful. Now it we could just figure what that red ribbon (behind Mr. Barcode) is, but Plex isn't selling that.

I Am Line, LaserTech resized 600

The face of a real person will always command attention. In this, it's what draws you to read the headline. And before you know it, you've read the whole ad. That's great industrial marketing advertising.

Quick Die Change, PFA resized 600

It doesn't get any simplier than this. We like the 3D illustration and the pictorial index of the components used in the illustration. You needn't speak the language to understand this marketing communication.

Yes To Clean, General Cable resized 600

Last, but not least, this ad uses the hand again as a placeholder for the person and the contrast to the clean wire is backed up by the simple headline.

 


If you liked this post, you might like our "Manufacturing Industrial Brands series."


Creative marketing communications

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Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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Why Blogging is the #1 Marketing Communication for Sales Leads

Wed, Mar 27, 2013 @ 02:36 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing Communications, Inbound Marketing, Industrial Advertising, SEO - search engine optimization, Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Internet Marketing, CMS - Content Management System, Technical Writing, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Business to Consumer Advertising, Content Creation, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, blogging, Advertising Agency

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Writing is the primary basis upon which your work, your learning, and your intellect will be judged.

Thanks to Marquette University.

The internet is based on the written word. A system based on visual images is coming up fast but it's not here yet. So until then we must deal with the written word. Google's search algorithm is based on being able to search quickly through related words. You can start at the beginning and go through any list one at a time or you can break up the deck of words into stacks and search each one at the same time. Another method is to follow the connections between cards. But it's all based on the relationships between words. I learned about Google's algorithms by taking the Algorithms Design and Analysis Part 1 Course offered by Sanford University.

Marketing Blog Communication Leads resized 600
Customers' want accurate information on the products they are considering purchasing, a marketing communication blog can fulfill that need. Thanks to Hubspot.

The future of marketing is a customer calls and is ready to buy. They have already done their research and have decided on whom they are going to work with. You!

Marketing Communications for Consumers

This illustration isn't for industrial marketers but you can replace Pinterest, Instagram and Foursquare with the industry blog, association and continuing education. Don't forget about them. Thanks to SocialMediaToday.

"I thought great content led to connections, but really, it’s the other way around. Feeling like an idiot, I decided to give it a shot. I wrote about the same topics. My writing didn’t improve at all. I promoted my posts in exactly the same way. The only difference was I made some friends with popular bloggers first, and then I asked them to help me promote it. Here’s what happened: Within one month, I was averaging 1000 visitors a day from StumbleUpon, Delicious, and Digg. Why? Because I got to know Brian Clark, and he connected me with social media power users who promoted my posts," thanks to Guest Blogging Jonathan Morrow.

LinkedIn Mapping Marketing Communications resized 600

LinkedIn Labs, InMaps shows you your network. "What do the different colors means? We assign colors based on how all of the people in your network -- such as people you went to school with, friends or colleagues -- are interconnected. Our algorithm looks at your graph of connections and finds up to eight common groups. The denser your network is (plus, the more of your connections who are also connected to each other), the better the algorithm is able to differentiate. We don’t use any other information like groups, companies or shares to group people by color - we just look at your network structure. Use your mouse-wheel or the + and – buttons to zoom in your map. An individual's name only appears when you zoom. You can also mouse over nodes to reveal names and headlines. When you click on a node, it loads the individual's information on the right panel and highlights their connection on the map." My network is pictured above with one of my connections selected.

Writing plus sharing equals marketing communications.

"As a blogger, I do have one thing in my mind regarding the blog posts. Blog readers should share the blog posts on social networks wherever possible which we don’t see very often. As most of you know, social media sharing has greater impact on search engine optimization and social shares of your article would definitely improve the overall buzz of your blog," thanks to Pawan Bawdane.

"A new era of digital communications has opened an array of new channels that businesses can use to educate, enlighten, and engage audiences. Enterprises, both large and small, across the globe are embracing these news channels and using them to better communicate their narrative and control their storytelling in order to win visibility, cement alliances, build relationships, drive sales, and ultimately better connect and influence the decision makers who purchase their products or services," thanks to Greg Matusky.

It's not enough to just write a 600 word blog twice a week. You need to cultivate a group of like minded bloggers and promote each other. The internet is like an ocean. You can't treat it like a neighborhood pond. There's nothing wrong with that and that is what most of the internet is for many companies, a small world of just employees, reps, customers and friends. But if you are going to reach out to the U.S. or the world, you are going to have to learn to leverage the internet capabilities to do that. Welcome to a brave new world. It's fun.


If you liked this post, you may like:

Industrial New Product Introduction Marketing Communications Part 1/2

Industrial New Product Introduction Marketing Communications Part 2/2

 


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How to Create Emotional Marketing Communications

Wed, Mar 20, 2013 @ 11:04 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Industrial Marketing Advertising, Industrial Marketing Trade Show, Literature Design, Promotional Brochure Design, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Marketing and Advertising Fun, Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, Advertising Literature Design, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Cincinnati Literature Design, Advertising Agency, Ad Design

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To create marketing people love, you need to appeal to their emotions.

As said in his blog, "People buy on emotion—and justify by logic." You can learn more about emotional persuasion at the Wikipedia post where it lists these appeals to emotion:

  • Advertising
  • Faith
  • Presentation and Imagination
  • Propaganda
  • Pity
  • Seduction
  • Tradition

Breakthroguh Marketing Communications 1 resized 600
This ad "connects" with the viewer because it contains a human hand. The connectors on the fingers make you think about why they are there. Are they hurting the hand? What are they doing there? Adding a body part into an ad is like adding a person. It's also one reason testimonials are successful when there's a photo of the person, looking at you, telling their experiences. If the story is good enough, your opinion will be changed.

 

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Why does this ad evoke a visceral reaction? No one likes a messy job. Here's a solution. And then, there are those hands again! You only have a few seconds to introduce the main benefit and visual that backs it up. The double entendre, from something that you can hold in your hand to a push-button effort, always helps develop the main visual and headline. Your brain looks at it like a riddle. And who doesn't like trying to solve a riddle?

 

Emotional Marketing Communications 3 resized 600

This is one of the most humorous ads the agency has ever produced. It was fun to do and started out as a takeoff on the Splice Girls, but the lawyers said we had to make it a parody. So out went the attractive young ladies, and in came the construction workers dressed in drag. Those husky models were a bit surprised at the costumes we had for them! Like other successful ads we've done, it was immediately ripped out of the publication and stuck on the company billboard with callouts of the likely suspects in the company identified! It's the print equivalent of going viral.


Emotional marketing Communications 4 resized 600

This is the most "graphic" ad the agency produced and so were reactions. Some people really didn't like it, but most were amused and everyone remembered it. Phone calls to the client (immediately after publication) complained it cast the industry in a bad light. (The rendering business is in the business of reducing carcasses to pulp for further processing.) This ad style is hard to pull off. Industrial marketing's job is to tell a simple story with a benefit. Not to polarize the market or give the viewer any reason to go elsewhere. If you can't be funny, memorable and educational in industrial advertising, you're on thin ice. Negative ads almost always backfire in B2B. Your local TV news is all about bad news, social media is about good news. Read more about that effect in The Economic Times.


Emotional marketing Communications 5 resized 600

The use of strong, evocative words can make your ad work. The play on words leads to the small application photo.


Emotional Marketing Communications 6 resized 600

Trade show displays can elicit feelings as well. It was a bit of a roller coaster ride for the creator of Connectosaurus Rex. Can you imagine having sold the idea and then having to build it! This is a highly conservative industry, but the final product was a big hit. We even added a sound track. As the visitor walked by the monster piped up and told a joke!

This is bull

Last but not least, this ad won awards for its direct simplicity. Rules were made to be broken and this ad was negative toward the rumors competitors were circulating about our client. The ad reiterated those rumors and then refuted them.


If you liked this post, contrast it with Green marketing communications. Where you are going to have to use your brain, at some point.

How to Create Green Building Marketing Communications, Mar Com Blog post


Creative marketing communications

Download our free guide to Creative Marketing Communications,

Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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Integrate Your Corporate Brochure Strategically Into Marketing Communications

Tue, Feb 05, 2013 @ 01:48 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Literature Design, Promotional Brochure Design, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Advertising, Advertising Design, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, Advertising Literature Design, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Cincinnati Literature Design

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The introduction, the elevator speech, why choose me?

These are all goals of the introductory corporate marketing communication brochure. A combination of visual magnetism, history, curiosity and purpose. You certainly want someone who actually reads it to come away clearly understanding who you are and why they should trust you with their business.

In this example the company has three divisions. One division had invested in an attractive line of product literature and a corporate overview. Their marketing communications needed the corporate overview because the market didn't know the parent company as well as other players. When the time came for one of the other divisions to need a corporate brochure it was a natural to borrow some of the design elements and customize it to their market. The results are that as a whole, if all the divisions were being presented, the parent company looks focused on their markets and their customers.

Brochure Cover Design 1Brochure Cover Design 2

The brochure cover's number one purpose is to get someone to pick it up and open. In this case it is the reflection of a photo from the founding of the company in 1951. Hundreds of employees attended a holiday program in their new plant; the photographer captured them as they all turned around the face the camera. When we create the third brochure we'll use the same reflected image but in their product.

Cover Strategies:

  • Visual Magnetism - Use a clever visual technique that intrigues the reader and teases them with what the company does
  • Company name needs to be prominent
  • The company tag line should point to mission and vision

Usually these brochures don't stand-alone and are a continual process of evolution from previously printed pieces and web sites. And that's a good thing; rarely does a brand need a complete overhaul. The best thing is to stay on course and make small corrections. This sequence of photos illustrates the evolution of a rock crushing machine company over the last 50 years.

Brochure Design 1Brochure Design 2Brochure Design 3Brochure Design 4

Now for the reveal - the first spread! Make it good because it sets the tone for the rest of the brochure. 

Brochure Spread Design

In this example a cutaway drawing is used to illustrate the benefits and features of the product.

For multiple page brochures and catalogs a consistent grid is needed to establish the rhythm of information. To show the user where to find the information he is looking for. English readers follow an established path from the upper left to the upper right to the lower left and then the lower right. A "Z" path.

Brochure Design Grid resized 600

This image illustrates the cover and inside page grid for a four model machine tool spindle drill head.

Brochure design Cincinnati resized 600

This inside spread illustrates all the different voices you can mix and match to provide content and not tire the eye:
• Clear statement of who we are
• Our sister companies
• An aerial view of the plant says it all about the size and capabilities
• Our personal sales approach
• Our history through the group photos and the timeline
* For more information go to our web site

Finally, after the brochure is all done, out in the field and selling product your job isn't done. Listen closely to the feedback coming from the field and incorporate new ideas and benefit/features that help market the product. Sometimes the simplest changes help push just the right buttons in the sales cycle.



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