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The Industrial Marketing Trade Show Dance at CONEXPO 2017

Sun, Mar 05, 2017 @ 02:10 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Trade Show Displays, Trade Show, Trade Show Displays, Industrial Marketing Trade Show, Trade Show Banner Stand, Trade Exhibit Modular Displays, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Advertising, Trade Show Exhibits, Trade Booths, Trade Exhibits

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Everyone in the industrial market knows that the CONEXPO-CONAGG 2017 show is opening Tuesday March 7. The conference will be in Las Vegas from March 7-11 and is expecting over 125,000 attendees and 2,400 exhibitors. In terms of a conference, that is huge and provides quite the opportunity for any business. 

Radio_Conexpo_v5.jpgThe CONEXPO got its start here in Ohio in 1909, debuting as a ‘Road Show.’ The early exhibitors prided themselves on displaying ‘amazing new devices’ that could do the work of 15 horses. It continued to grow and did so at an unprecedented rate during the construction boom after World War II. In the 1970’s it opened its doors to the international community, as well as, the CON/AGG show, which also had began in the early 1900’s; by combining shows and creating CONEXPO-CON/AGG, both attendees and exhibitors alike we able to experience all the emerging products, equipment, and services in one place, maximizing time, money, and educational opportunities of the construction and industrial industries.

With so many people and exhibitions attending this show, most industrial companies recognize the importance of marketing their product or service. They know that this is an opportunity to reach other businesses, consumers, and influential individuals in the industry, which is why having a solid team, effective communication, and a game plan are so important for a trade show of this caliber.

Preparing for a Trade Show

This is the first step required for a good trade show exhibit. Everyone must be on the same page about what is required from him or her and how to, not just execute it, but to do so properly. This requires effective communication, clear guidelines, and stringent implementation.

Preparation for the show includes everything from how your booth will look to with whom you staff it; both should be of high quality.

Too many times have I been to a trade show that individuals are on their phones, talking to each other, or eating food when they should be grabbing the attention of the people passing by. This typically happens because stringent rules weren’t put into place to prevent such things from happening. Allowing such behavior to occur will only hurt the company and the reputations of those involved; possibly affecting your credibility and professionalism. Be sure to have educated employees and sales staff on hand who are dedicated to success and to achieving the purpose of the trade show: to gather leads and to make connections.

This is where effective communication comes into play. Let staffers know that they are there for a purpose and that purpose is to generate leads, not to eat McDonald’s in the back of the booth around noon. The typical trade booth staff will walk away from training with a good pitch to throw at people passing by, but an excellent staff will walk away knowing an immense amount of knowledge on the product as well as having a clear objective to what they are responsible for doing. Some booths include people who just catch the attention and move interested individuals to sales reps who know more about the product and while the assembly line is beneficial and provides an organized mechanism for all booth employees, reminding employees that everyone has the same objective helps keep everyone on track and can help prevent a lack of involvement from employees. Some companies sometimes implement contests, hoping to motivate employees and sales reps alike to drive in business.

Creating an Inviting Trade Show Booth

You want to make sure your booth looks welcoming, interesting, and clean. You don’t want something that is too ‘homey,’ people won’t take you seriously, but you also don’t want a both that results in looking so technological or industrial that a layperson can’t understand it and are too intimidated to stop by or don’t find it interesting. Having a well-balanced booth and a friendly staff of people who can clearly and concisely explain what you have to offer is the best route to go here. trade show

Providing information, good information, is crucial to the success of your booth. Pamphlets are great and are very popular at trade shows, but how many of those make it to the plane ride home? Not many, most natives to the city hosting the  trade show will tell you that most of them end up littering the streets once all visitors have left. This is where educated employees matter, reinforcing the point above. According to Skyline Exhibits 5 common Pitfalls to Trade Show Marketing blog, offering to take someone’s email address or telephone number on the spot and stating that they probably have enough to carry without you adding to their load can be a very effective means of gathering individuals’ information. Using technology, like a tablet for instance, in this situation can maximize your outreach. People may not have one of your pamphlets to throw away at the airport, but they will be able to check the email you sent or listen to the voicemail you left on the plane ride home; already making for a more personal experience and your booth, and more importantly your product, will stick out in their mind.

Effective Marketing of Your Trade Show Attendance

Standing out at a trade show is important and learning how can be difficult. According to Susan Friedmann, the Trade Show Coach there is more than one way to do this. One of the best strategies is having your company/client try and align new product announcements and trade shows together. Having a new product to premier at a  trade show is a good way to get some press prior to the show. We have had a couple of clients take this route for the CON/AGG conference and we have been shooting out press releases and public relations left and right. Most publications, whether print or electronic, are willing to take such information and publish it. They too recognize the enormity of the show and know that many people are reading publications to ‘be ahead of the game’ and to know what to expect from the trade show exhibits. Also be aware that most publications need this information well in advance, so having your own deadlines to accomplish the media announcements is necessary.

trade showUtilize social media. Make it known on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, etc. that you will be there and that you have something new rolling out. This also will build an interest with your followers who aren’t going to the show itself and could even prompt them to come along too.

Schedule a press conference if possible. Many media outlets, local and international, will be covering the convention; such large conventions can get a lot of coverage time via the media and having a press conference about your new product or your attendance can really increase your popularity at the show; not to mention the publicity involved with media coverage.

Learning the trade show dance can be difficult, especially when the convention/show itself has been around for over one hundred years; that makes for an evolution of dance. But, surrounding yourself with a positive, well-motivated team who is willing to work hard, combined with effective marketing and a welcoming booth should create a successful experience.

See you there!

If you liked this post, you will also enjoy Trade Show Display Exhibit Booth Marketing Trends

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Plan for an Industrial Content Driven Marketing campaign

Fri, Jan 20, 2017 @ 04:54 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Graphic Design Agency, Advertising Agency, Industrial Content Driven Marketing

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Consumer media is getting very fractured, but industrial content driven marketing is still led by a few quality publishing houses. 

Sure you can spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on full page ads every month in your industrial trade publications. But you wouldn't be taking advantage of the invitation to supply educational and application articles to the publication as well. Industrial marketing is a partnership between you and the industrial publishing houses. And that includes trade shows as well. The best publishing companies also have the best shows.

 Industrial-Content-Marketing.jpg

 

But don't start your Industrial Content Driven Marketing by dropping your advertising programs. Sure industrial engineers use the Internet to find products and services but most times they aren't looking for cheap high volumes. LinkedIn Groups can't reach the audience a good industrial trade journal can. They have been at it for generations and even though many of them are getting slim they are getting better at serving up great content online. It is sort of like asking a 60 year old to start dating again but they are. Google wants to serve up the best results for their searchers and the vetted trade journals are the best. You can't find manufacturing engineering as a company description on Facebook. They keep asking us to change our client's descriptions to "Local Service."

So trim your advertising budget down to three placements a year in the top two or three publications and also make a commitment to provide two or three articles. They will cost you several thousand dollars each but they will be the gift that keeps on giving. If they rank well on the internet you can also promote them with Google, Bing or LinkedIn Adwords or Sponsored Content. Better yet tie your advertising to your content.

Industrial-Content-Driven-Marketing.jpg

The featured image in this blog post is the advertisement that promotes the technical article above. The article also goes on the client's website. Ads today are like landing pages on the internet. They are to promote a piece of content. How Hubspot would like you to get folks to exchange their email address for that content but that is much harder to achieve. Still, you can track how many visitors come to your site from the ads and content. And then adjust your media buy next year. 

And that sums up what's happening in the industrial marketing world. Publications are trying to migrate over to being completely digital not because they want to but because their readers are dying off. The editorial teams will continue to rule the content world, now we just have to find a way to pay them.

 

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Who has the Emperor's Clothes? Google AdWord Facts for Process Equipment Marketing

Wed, Oct 21, 2015 @ 09:38 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Internet Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Advertising, Business to Business Advertising, Business to Consumer Advertising, Internet Advertising

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Process Equipment Marketing Google AdWordsSome industry watchers say Google is a modern day "Emperor's New Clothes" story. Everyone is so worried they will look stupid; they don't see the hypocrisy of AdWords. Here are ten reasons why. We're forced to use AdWords because our clients want to come up on top of a Google search no matter what. We try to encourage improving the page content, but that's more difficult than just paying for AdWords. That's even what American Express says in its book, "When Everything Clicks: Your Guide to Pay-Per-Click Advertising.

 

  1. Bounce rate 100 percent when the ad specifically says this is a sub-micron grinder. A human couldn't be selecting our ad.
  2. They change the algorithm to spend what you set, even if it's within 3 percent of what was spent if you didn't limit it.
  3. You set AdWords to "spend until used" and your ad displays throughout the entire day at $20.
  4. You change to "let Google balance your spend throughout the day" and in a few weeks, your ad doesn't display anymore and your budget needs to be increased.
  5. Your ads don't show when you search anonymously. Google says that's the way it's designed. You already didn't click on it the last time. This is even though you clicked the global symbol. It's because you have to select "AdWords will set my bids to help maximize clicks within my target budget," of course at the suggestion of Google. We refreshed ten times, and still our ad never came up.
  6. Your Quality Score is low, but you and two other companies are the only ones in the world that offer that product
  7. Your ad still gets clicked at 3 a.m. on Sunday, for locomotive train electrical resistors.
  8. You search on a company name in a dozen languages and get a similar search results number, whether the US or Estonia.
  9. There is no algorithm to suspend ads if you are ranking high naturally. Google says it's best practices to advertise when you are already number one organically. We think this is patently stupid.
  10. Why is Bing just about as effective but only ten percent of the cost of Google?
  11. Why doesn't Google give agencies a commission on sales? There is no alternative. How did this happen? Early printing was managed by a monarch. Millennia later, airwaves were regulated and licensed. But the Internet has no watchdogs. Churchill nailed it: "Never was so much owed by so many to so few."

But all isn't so wrong. This is just because common public interest algorithms don't meet typical engineering search criteria. The search engines do a good enough job for our job. I've just pointed out most of the odd problems


All is not lost. Retailing tycoon John Wanamaker once said, "I know that half of my advertising doesn’t work. The problem is, I don’t know which half." Best to focus on being creative and great content.

Technical content to support your marketing efforts doesn't have to be rocket science. Download our free content guide that is based on fundamental Masters of Business Administration principals, "The purpose of a company is to create and retain customers."

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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Water Efficiency:  Reader Survey, Industrial Marketing Review

Tue, Oct 06, 2015 @ 03:54 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Marketing, Advertising, Advertising Design, Advertisement Design, print advertising, Advertising Agency

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Verizon - Very good ad with a real life photo of truckers. The message is a classic Call-To-Action with an eBook to download. Very well done.


Another great ad. Very clear headline, good photo and the copy gets right to the point about the guarantee. Directs folks to their booth and even social sharing buttons.


Starts out great with a clear metaphor of the dual nature of their business but then the copy says nothing except for a few buzz words. Sure it's pretty much impossible to actually use a testimonial but I would like to have one. At least an actual problem solution that demonstrates their capabilities would be better. With real numbers and real results.


It's very hard to have an attention getting ad without a human or an animal in it. It would have been better to put a fish in the glass. What is chlorsulfonated polyethylene? It's an honest question this ad should answer.

 
I take it back what I said about Burke. This ad is informative and doesn't have an animal in it. Good invitation to the product launch and a convincing story. A lot packed into a small package but it works. Good job, Crane.


Oh boy, "Settle the Fuck Down!" It's not even a metaphor for their process. Or so complicated I don't get it. Great photo and an easy to understand process that replaces flocculant. Why not explain it? They start in the fine print.


A branding ad with the name in the headline. Why waste the space? What does Aerostrip mean? Air-O-Strip? Strip-O-Air would be better. The copy begs for some actual detail about how it saves money and time. Is the floor mounting patented? 


If you can't say anything but your name at least show some projects. Some capacities or details of the photos would be nice.


Everything works great. I'd just like to know the guy's name and contact info, I'm ready to learn more. The promised application examples aren't on their web site.


Good information for applications. I guess the ad is dual purpose for manufacturing ideas and for membership. Pick one or the other, if you can.


What's the use of such a milk toast ad? Like logos on a Nascar? At least BASF had a slogan, "We don't make the products, we make them better." Better off using the cost of this ad to sponsor industry association meetings. They could use it. At least their local rep could get up and say a few words.


Nice informative ad. I like the story they tell and the clear product definition and illustration.


Good basic product ad. Begs to be online with the video link. I thought I was going to get a good demonstration but instead I got a long funky web page. Still don't understand how it eliminates a welded flange.

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Lohre & Assoc. Welcomes Noted Artist and Web Designer Myke Amend to its Team

Tue, Sep 29, 2015 @ 02:09 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Website Design, Advertising, Graphic Design, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, Graphic Design Agency, illustration, web development, Website Design Company, Design Agency, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Advertising Agency, Web Design

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Web Design and Web Development Guru, Grphic Artist and Graphic Designer, Myke AmendCincinnati native Myke Amend recently joined Lohre & Associates, the Over-the-Rhine-based marketing communications agency, fulltime as Web Design & Internet Development creative officer. Amend has worked with Lohre for the past 10 years as a web designer and web developer on a freelance basis from Grand Rapids, Mich.

Amend, who returns to Cincinnati for the new position, brings two decades experience as a graphic designer, web designer, programmer, and Internet developer, working on a variety of business-to-business and consumer accounts. Additionally, Amend is an illustrator, engraver and painter, whose work has been commissioned by other artists in film, music and literature.

“We’re very excited to have Myke working with us,” says Chuck Lohre, president, “He brings the creativity and skills of a fine artist, with his vast digital expertise. It’s a perfect combination for our agency, which is known for creative solutions to the wide variety of branding, strategy and digital implementation projects we handle for our clients.”

Adds Amend, “It’s gratifying to know Chuck and his team of designers, writers, strategists and brand experts welcome the years of experience I bring from fine arts with the in-demand digital know-how. I’m excited to develop ways we can continue to solve challenges for the companies who have looked to Lohre for ways to set them apart from their competitors.”

Amend’s illustrations have been featured in “Weird Tales” magazine, “Beneath Ceaseless Skies,” “Gatehouse Gazette,” “Kilter” magazine, “Gothic Beauty” magazine, the art collection “Gothic Art Now,” the art collection “Vampire Art Now,” the “Airship Pirates RPG” and many more print publications as well as popular online resources such as “IO9,” “Elfwood,” “Dark Roasted Blend,” “Fantasy Art” magazine, “Lines and Colors,” “Brass Goggles,” “Gawker, “BoingBoing.” His work has also been featured on the sites of literary creatives including Warren Ellis, Thomas Ligotti, Neil Gaiman and Clive Barker.

Additionally Dexter Palmer, Cherie Priest, The Pickled Brothers Sideshow, Vernian Process, Veronique Chevalier, the Borgia Popes, Automaton, Abney Park and others have commissioned Amend for works. He is often a special guest of art, horror and steampunk conventions. He also works in sculpture and kinetic art, most notably having created a 4000-lb. solar and wind-powered rotating mural and 3D work called “the Infernal Device,” which was displayed at the Gerald R. Ford Museum for ArtPrize 2011.

In between Myke has filled his time working on ModelARestorers.org, as sole designer, webmaster, and server admin of a site serving 180 chapters Worldwide, creating advertising art for Disney Fine Art Gallery, and of course working for Lohre and Associates, for whom he now works full time.

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Pay Per Click - Good Industrial Marketing Idea or Money Pit?

Wed, Jul 22, 2015 @ 05:00 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Process Equipment Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Internet Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising Agency

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With careful consideration, thoughtful planning, and the right hacks, Pay Per Click (PPC) advertising can be a helpful resource investment alongside other marketing campaigns. Thanks to Marcel Pirlich for his PPC email this morning as inspiration.

Five core aspects of PPC:

1) Define your goals.

Ask yourself:

    • What do we offer? What makes us special? Where do we offer our product?
    • Who is our target audience? Where are our potential customers? What do we want our prospects to do?
    • What is our budget? How much do we want to spend monthly on PPC? How much do we want to pay for one new customer, sign-up, etc.?
The more specifically you can answer these questions, the more effective your PPC advertising will be.

2) Develop a comprehensive keyword list.

Industrial marketing ideas for AdwordsWhen it comes to keyword selection for startups, long-tail terms are great ones to go after. They're highly targeted and may be more cost-efficient than more competitive terms.

The best way to do this is to understand the questions about your business and audience. Once you know broad terms related to your business, do some research to figure out some of the popular long-tail searches related to those terms. The chart illustrates different types of keywords for the different buying cycle stage: top of the funnel (research), middle of the funnel (specifications) and bottom of the funnel (buying).

3) Know your competitors like your best friend.

Why do I need Industrial marketing ideasAfter identifying your goals and a solid keyword list, complete a competitive analysis -- not so you can obsess over them, but so you can identify opportunities.

Do other company's offer a strong differentiation? Are they bidding on keywords you've missed? How are their ads and landing pages different from yours? Asking yourself these questions can provide clarity regarding who else is in your market and what their acquisition tactics are.

4) Track your conversions right from the start.

Goals for Industrial Marketing IdeasIf you can't attribute actual leads and customers to your PPC activities, you can't make intelligent decisions about where to cut spend (or increase it).

Knowing which ones led to clicks, leads, and customers can give you a clear picture about the success not only of your PPC campaigns, but also about your target audience and how you can adjust your messaging across all your marketing assets. Sometimes a goal is just an RFQ or contact page.

5) Continue to fine-tune your PPC campaigns -- and skills.

The best business concept is worthless if you don't know how to promote it online. Being successful with PPC requires becoming a real pro. How do you start? Learn from experts, and never stop informing yourself, because the truth is this: PPC is highly dynamic and constantly has new updates and features.

Just know this if you begin working on a PPC campaign: It requires some close attention to ensure your ad dollars are being used effectively. So don't start it with a set-it-and-forget-it approach; your budget and results will benefit from close attention.


If this much attention to your web site is too much, you may like, "A More Reserved Internet Marketing Strategy."


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The Industrial Marketing Trade Show Dance at CONEXPO

Wed, Jul 22, 2015 @ 11:30 AM / by Lauren Campbell posted in Industrial Trade Show Displays, Trade Show, Trade Show Displays, Industrial Marketing Trade Show, Trade Show Banner Stand, Trade Exhibit Modular Displays, Construction Equipment Marketing, Advertising, Trade Show Exhibits, Trade Booths, Trade Exhibits

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Everyone in the industrial market knows that the CONEXPO-CONAGG 2014 show is coming up in March. The conference will be in Las Vegas from March 4-8 and is expecting over 125,000 attendees and 2,400 exhibitors. In terms of a conference, that is huge and provides quite the opportunity for any business. 

CONEXPO-CON/AGGThe CONEXPO got its start here in Ohio in 1909, debuting as a ‘Road Show.’ The early exhibitors prided themselves on displaying ‘amazing new devices’ that could do the work of 15 horses. It continued to grow and did so at an unprecedented rate during the construction boom after World War II. In the 1970’s it opened its doors to the international community, as well as, the CON/AGG show, which also had began in the early 1900’s; by combining shows and creating CONEXPO-CON/AGG, both attendees and exhibitors alike we able to experience all the emerging products, equipment, and services in one place, maximizing time, money, and educational opportunities of the construction and industrial industries.

With so many people and exhibitions attending this show, most industrial companies recognize the importance of marketing their product or service. They know that this is an opportunity to reach other businesses, consumers, and influential individuals in the industry, which is why having a solid team, effective communication, and a game plan are so important for a trade show of this caliber.

Preparing for a Trade Show

This is the first step required for a good trade show exhibit. Everyone must be on the same page about what is required from him or her and how to, not just execute it, but to do so properly. This requires effective communication, clear guidelines, and stringent implementation.

Preparation for the show includes everything from how your booth will look to with whom you staff it; both should be of high quality.

Too many times have I been to a trade show that individuals are on their phones, talking to each other, or eating food when they should be grabbing the attention of the people passing by. This typically happens because stringent rules weren’t put into place to prevent such things from happening. Allowing such behavior to occur will only hurt the company and the reputations of those involved; possibly affecting your credibility and professionalism. Be sure to have educated employees and sales staff on hand who are dedicated to success and to achieving the purpose of the trade show: to gather leads and to make connections.

This is where effective communication comes into play. Let staffers know that they are there for a purpose and that purpose is to generate leads, not to eat McDonald’s in the back of the booth around noon. The typical trade booth staff will walk away from training with a good pitch to throw at people passing by, but an excellent staff will walk away knowing an immense amount of knowledge on the product as well as having a clear objective to what they are responsible for doing. Some booths include people who just catch the attention and move interested individuals to sales reps who know more about the product and while the assembly line is beneficial and provides an organized mechanism for all booth employees, reminding employees that everyone has the same objective helps keep everyone on track and can help prevent a lack of involvement from employees. Some companies sometimes implement contests, hoping to motivate employees and sales reps alike to drive in business.

Creating an Inviting Trade Show Booth

You want to make sure your booth looks welcoming, interesting, and clean. You don’t want something that is too ‘homey,’ people won’t take you seriously, but you also don’t want a both that results in looking so technological or industrial that a layperson can’t understand it and are too intimidated to stop by or don’t find it interesting. Having a well-balanced booth and a friendly staff of people who can clearly and concisely explain what you have to offer is the best route to go here. trade show

Providing information, good information, is crucial to the success of your booth. Pamphlets are great and are very popular at trade shows, but how many of those make it to the plane ride home? Not many, most natives to the city hosting the  trade show will tell you that most of them end up littering the streets once all visitors have left. This is where educated employees matter, reinforcing the point above. According to Skyline Exhibits 5 common Pitfalls to Trade Show Marketing blog, offering to take someone’s email address or telephone number on the spot and stating that they probably have enough to carry without you adding to their load can be a very effective means of gathering individuals’ information. Using technology, like a tablet for instance, in this situation can maximize your outreach. People may not have one of your pamphlets to throw away at the airport, but they will be able to check the email you sent or listen to the voicemail you left on the plane ride home; already making for a more personal experience and your booth, and more importantly your product, will stick out in their mind.

Effective Marketing of Your Trade Show Attendance

Standing out at a trade show is important and learning how can be difficult. According to Susan Friedmann, the Trade Show Coach there is more than one way to do this. One of the best strategies is having your company/client try and align new product announcements and trade shows together. Having a new product to premier at a  trade show is a good way to get some press prior to the show. We have had a couple of clients take this route for the CONEXPO-CON/AGG conference and we have been shooting out press releases and public relations left and right. Most publications, whether print or electronic, are willing to take such information and publish it. They too recognize the enormity of the show and know that many people are reading publications to ‘be ahead of the game’ and to know what to expect from the trade show exhibits. Also be aware that most publications need this information well in advance, so having your own deadlines to accomplish the media announcements is necessary.

trade showUtilize social media. Make it known on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, etc. that you will be there and that you have something new rolling out. This also will build an interest with your followers who aren’t going to the show itself and could even prompt them to come along too.

Schedule a press conference if possible. Many media outlets, local and international, will be covering the CONEXPO-CON/AGG convention; such large conventions can get a lot of coverage time via the media and having a press conference about your new product or your attendance can really increase your popularity at the show; not to mention the publicity involved with media coverage.

Learning the trade show dance can be difficult, especially when the convention/show itself has been around for over one hundred years; that makes for an evolution of dance. But, surrounding yourself with a positive, well-motivated team who is willing to work hard, combined with effective marketing and a welcoming booth should create a successful CONEXPO-CON/AGG experience.

See you there!

If you liked this post, you will also enjoy Trade Show Display Exhibit Booth Marketing Trends

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Industrial Marketing Review 3-2015 Foundry Management & Technology Ads

Sun, Apr 19, 2015 @ 11:41 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Advertising, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, print advertisements, Advertising Agency

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Didion Advertising DesignDiDion Advertising Design 2 
Very good ad with four excellent testimonials. Good information but they didn't have to go negative with "Competition relies on hype, bogus claims and negative scare tactics."
 

Mold Handling Ad Design
Very good ad that matches the copy claims with the montage of images. If you recognized your facility, they have the equipment for you.
 

Iko Advertisement design
This is just a line card ad of the material list they supply. I wish they would have touched on at least one benefit for each product. They could have been tied to the montage of images, they illustrate the products' usage.
 

FSD Advertising DesignAdvertisement Design by FSD 
A little disappointed with the waste of space in this two page spread. Forget the flags on the second page and tie some location and result to the seven images on page one.
 

Advertisement Design for Vibra-Drum 
Good information in the copy but wasted space by using just about the same view for a large and small image. Better to use one and make it a cut-away that pointed out some of the benefit features.
 

Efficient Advertising Design
Liked everything about this ad except for the headline, "Efficient, Reliable and Advanced." It would be better to tie a specific testimonial benefit to them like, 125% Efficient, 110% Uptime and 65% Energy Savings. The copy can back up the headline claims.
 

Ad Design for GIFA 
Typical show ad. There must be something visual they could use instead of an illustrated globe. Industrial times are much better so maybe they could tout the record breaking increase in technical presentations, exhibitors and attendees? To quote the Director, Friedrich-Georg Kehrer, “In contrast to many capital goods trade fairs at other locations, there is no sign of a decline of any kind at our four trade fairs. The four events hold an almost unrivalled position anywhere in the world. Düsseldorf is the only place where companies reach the entire global market and this is vital for their business operations.”
 

Advertising Design for EC&S 
Everything is good about this ad except for the order and the headline. Quote some customer saying, "They Engineered a Solution and Built it Too." Put that at the top, with a follow up subhead, the photos and at the end the logo and signature. Focus on the service and not the source.
 

Ad Design for Foundry Technology 
One of the best ads but the headline is a real bummer. Maybe, "Four Ways to Ask Us to Set Your Equipment or Concept-To-Completion!"
 

Advertising Design for Hunter
Great ad, wish they had the budget to make it a full page. It wouldn't look so crowded and hard to read if it was on a white field.

Advertising made Creepy 
The secret to a good ad is to associate a common, memorable metaphor that reminds a reader about your unique sales proposition. I'm not sure about this metaphor. You have to create ads that the sales guys will like to use to get their point across. Passing out rubber gloves won't get the kind of attention you're looking for. Maybe get permission to use Norman Rockwell's illustration of the family physician checking the little girl's doll with the headline, "Checkups Even For Your Dreams."
 

Solutions Advertisement
The Ask ads are always top notch. Just wish they could say something coming from that engineer's mouth. Like, "Take a Close Look at How Much You Can Save With Our Solutions."
 

Sinto Advertisement
Begs for a testimonial. What am I looking at? Please point out the features that deliver durability, reliability and production.
 

Advertisement for Ajax TOCCO 
Good content but you can't communicate anything if you don't get their attention and the only way you can do that is to speak to the reader personally. I'd use one of their engineers to be in the ad and make a statement about customer service.
 
Heavy Duty Advertisement 
What does that illustration have to do with the lame headline anyway? Maybe it will come to me later but that's not the point in an ad. I'd use a 3D illustration of their equipment and focus on one industry's material running through it. Oh, now I get it. It's a rave, the machine jumped onto the floor and is body surfing the crowd.
 

First Step Advertisement 
Great copy. Please, just let an intern be the spokesperson, "At XYZ Company I learned to ask for advice and then think for myself." Isn't that the type of employee you're looking for?
 
Advertising for Cor-Met
No need to duplicate the company name in the headline and signature. The packaging and metals tell the story, maybe put them together, if that will help catch a eye.
 

Creative Advertising 
Great ad. "The brain takes just 33 milliseconds-three hundredths of a second, or a tenth of a time it takes to blink-to decide whether someone is to be trusted," could be worked into the message and be more powerful.
 

Inverter Advertising
I'm dying to see a stop action illustration of this but the device is pretty self evident. Great ad but I can't read the company's name.

Foundry Advertising 
Good quarter page ad. Don't change a thing.
 

Advertisement for Fosco 
There must be something more interesting those engineers said than that. From their site, "dedicated teams strategically positioned across the globe." So, "Our Technical Staff in Guangdong Can Visit Your Plant Tomorrow."
 

 If you liked this post you may like, "How to Write an Industrial Marketing Telemarketing Script."


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Rocking Industrial Marketing Advertisements

Mon, Jan 06, 2014 @ 10:33 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Technical llustration, Industrial Marketing Advertising, Business to Consumer Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Business to Consumer Advertising, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, Advertising Agency

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How do you break through the clutter? Literally. That's our problem as we commence a new campaign for the mining business. Here'a a peek behind the creative process.

Art Dickinson Industrial PhotographyAt first we thought some great photography of their employees would stop everyone on the page. Photos of people are always effective in that respect. Even if the person's face is no larger than a postage stamp, eye-tracking software proves it makes viewers stop and look. But we're not the only creatives to note that -- it's why there are (reliably) a dozen or so such ads in every industry pub. Besides, trying to get the client to use employees is difficult. Conventional wisdom holds you don't want to promote employees for fear that they will want more money. Or worse, letting them get the idea they're indispensible. Testimonials from customers are better but don't hold your breath if your under deadline. Photo courtesy Art Dickinson Photography.

Creative Commons Industrial MarketingWhat are some other, stop-you-dead-in-your-tracks visual attention getters? Babies, dogs and scantily clad women tend to work for the roughneck set, but we don't care to go there. Recently we got involved in using Inventor and Light Wave to produce some 3D technical drawings of equipment. It inspired us to think about using the technology to use a cutaway of the machine and show how it operates. Then the question is: Does an overall picture of the machine tell the viewer instantly what the machine is good for? It's sort of like looking at a sports car versus a dumptruck. If you're selling either and the viewer is looking for that product, they will look at your ad. That's why a product line ad illustrating your product range, is normally a safe idea. Not particulary attention-getting, and actually very boring.

Thanks to Creative Commons for the photo.

Industrial marketing illlustrationSo what about an extreme closeup? Showing the technical details of how the machine works? If so, how would you make that interesting? There's a new smartphone app, Ateva, that allows you to look at a two-dimensional page and up pops a 3D object. The app is programed to identify the photo and then serve the 3D image through your tablet or smartphone. The viewer can move the phone around the page and see the different angles of the 3D illustration. We think that this just might be the ticket to getting attention. Thanks to Powder Bulk Engineering magazine for the image on the left, which could be very entertaining to rotate and zoom in on. We particularly like including a person in the illustration. But a machine cut-a-way is not personal enough to persuade. To persuade you need to strike the problem nerve.

rock and hard place 300x199What problem are you solving? What problem does the viewer have? It may not be the operation of the machine. In one recent example, the problem the customer had was the machine's size. Would it fit into the allowable space? "Between a rock and a hard place," could be a good headline for this example. And an illustration could be memorable and hopefully sharable, by poking some fun at it. A rock 'n' roll guitar plus a steel plate?  Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson paired with a diamond? On second thought, these ideas don't shock enough. The germ of a good idea is in here, contrasting items just have to tell the story of not fitting in. Or in this case, just fitting in. Thanks to Embracing My Journey for the photo.

In this example, the machine had a close fit in an underground mine. That's one of the reasons it couldn't be too tall -- it wouldn't fit in. How about a headless miner plus a punny header? "We're working hard to give you more headroom!" Or, "Let our Mega-Slam give you more headroom." The number one thing our client is known for is practical applications of these machines. This is a perfect example of that skill. If we can use the visual to tell these two stories, we'll have a home run. Practical knowledge, plus the right size for the huge capacity the customer wanted. "Fitting ten pounds in a five-pound bag,"


If you liked this post you may also like, "How to Create Emotional Marketing Communications."


Creative marketing communications

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Review: "Designing B2B Brands" for industrial marketing, part 4

Tue, Sep 24, 2013 @ 10:47 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Literature Design, Promotional Brochure Design, Marketing Strategy, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Graphic Design, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertisement Design, Branding Agency, Cincinnati Branding, Graphic Design Agency, Branding

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 Section 1 > Brand Overview > Brand Purpose

More thoughts on "Designing B2B Brands: Branding lessons from Deloitte and 195,000 Brand Managers," by Carlos Martinez Onaindia and Brian Resnick who worked for Deloitte's Global Brand & Communications group, while writing the book. These reviews look at branding from the point of view of our clients who manufacture industrial products.

Good branding requires manufacturers to have a purpose. There are several kinds of purposes for manufacturers:

Industrial marketing Firefighters

Go to work and put out fires. Fundamental problems in the market and the product are being ignored. The problems will never go away and their competitors know it. This is typically illustrated by faulty product design and engineering that won't allow manufacturing improvements and economical line extension.



Industrial marketing cash cow
Treat the company as a cash cow. The company has a competitive advantage -- as long as the product can be sold, made, shipped and serviced economically -- there will be a large amount of cash that can be extracted. Decisions are only made to reduce the costs of making, shipping and servicing, not to create major new market products.

 

Industrial marketing polar bear

Struggle to evolve and stay ahead in a market that is disappearing. The only solution is to create a new business model for the new markets, nearly impossible for older companies, only with deep dives into world class emerging technology and leveraging inexpensive new internet marketing techniques. Requires reeducating upper management and then their leadership. Employee growth is prime objective. You'll find this in employee owned companies (Publix Super Markets Inc.). The most advanced, progressive and technologically creative manufacturing companies are this type. Some require more than 50 hours of continuing education by each employee and give opportunities to every employee that wants to grow, learn and take on more responsibility.

 

industrial marketing ants

Micro-managing organization with state-of-the-art HR departments. It may seem inhuman but these are the most effective multi-nationals. Everything is measured and feedback given. Likewise, advanced research, industrial intelligence, global economics and IT tools are available for employee growth and product development. From the day you are hired, you are told exactly how you will be judged and compensated; but also given the tools to achieve your Big Hairy Audacious Goals.

 

Industrial marketing tree
Center your company around a unique technology. As long as you can keep ahead of any competition and get a generous margin, you can stay in business. Companies like this sometimes both sell the equipment and sell the parts the equipment can produce. Businesses like this can have a wonderful technological advantage both in engineering and marketing. Their unique selling proposition is understood by employees and customers.

 

 Industrial marketing homo sapiens

An environmental sustainable purpose for a company would be to work with the environment -- manufacturing things from others' waste and your waste is raw material for another company's product. Metal foundries are an age old example of this type of continually recycling business purpose. Mother Nature does this continually and we are just beginning to understand how to mimic natural processes to do the same. Patagonia is a good example of this company type, "The Footprint Chronicles® examines Patagonia’s life and habits as a company. The goal is to use transparency about our supply chain to help us reduce our adverse social and environmental impacts – and on an industrial scale. We’ve been in business long enough to know that when we can reduce or eliminate a harm, other businesses will be eager to follow suit."

This isn't your Dad's industrial marketing

If you liked this blog post you might be interested in another post on how Lohre & Assoc. is implementing sucessuful marketing campaigns by focusing on using new internet tools to aquire prospects, convert them into customers and delight them with customer service.


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