<img height="1" width="1" alt="" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/offsite_event.php?id=6008611837624&amp;value=0">

AdVenture Explores the Industrial Marketing and Sales Relationship

Fri, Aug 19, 2016 @ 03:17 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Web Design Company, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Internet Development, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Marketing, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Website Design Company, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Web Design

0 Comments


(This week's guest post is from Scott Costa, Publisher, tED magazine. We weren't able to go to AdVenture this year but it's the best industrial marketing conference for the electrical manufacturing and distribution industry. Our Creative Guide is from a presentation we gave at 2004's conference.  We just got the 8-19-2016 NAED eNews with this article featured.)

The 2016 NAED AdVenture Conference brought together about 140 marketing professionals in the same room.

And one sales professional.

Industrial Marketing bla bla bla

John Lorince from Leff Electric was in the company's marketing department, but moved to an outside sales position. His presentation drew the most questions and comments of the entire AdVenture Conference. By far. 

There were the obvious jokes about sales people being from the "Evil Empire" or "The Dark Side." But Lorince really put a lot of what marketing does into perspective by saying, "Some of what I thought was important, wasn't," when talking about his time in the marketing department. He also asked the marketing crowd how often they go on sales calls, and the answer was an overwhelming "once in a while."  Lorince believes it should be more than that. On the flip side, you have to wonder how many times a salesperson attended a marketing meeting or conference. Perhaps joining the two groups together a little more often would help bridge the communications gap.

Lorince added that it is extremely important for the marketing team to treat him like the customer. "Sell the products to me, so I can sell them to someone else," he advises. He also said he appreciates it when a member of the marketing team makes quick visits to his office to work with him on sales or special pricing, because in the long run it will make his job easier.

Lorince did a great job of providing a series of tips to the marketing people at the AdVenture Conference. So great that, before he finished, he was asked to mark his calendar to come back next year and address the group again.

His speech is really a great start to a very old problem. On one side, you have a marketing department that is using research, product knowledge, and concepts that set buying your products apart from the competition as an advantage. On the other side, you have sales people using research (like past history in successful selling), product knowledge, and concepts for setting himself apart from any other salesperson from another company to use as an advantage. So why are the two departments so far apart?

I tracked down some quotes from experts on B2B practices outside of electrical distribution, to find where they are seeing failures between marketing and sales. They are worth reading to see if you are experiencing the same situations. For example, Stephanie Tilton of Savvy B2B Marketing says, "Many corporate cultures don't support a meeting of the minds between sales and marketing. And without the support of upper management, any valiant attempts to close the gap will fizzle out. Whereas marketing often revolves around a campaign schedule, sales is sweating to meet quota."

Jennifer Beever or New Incite believes the problem between sales and marketing is traditional, and that tradition needs to end. "Traditional departments operate in silos, with each performing their function but not interacting with others. On one hand, too many marketing departments believe they need to operate autonomously, with input from sales. On the other hand, too many salespeople take a ‘maverick' approach, and don't give marketing credit for generating leads," Beever says.

This is an interesting topic, especially as we are seeing significant changes to our supply chain, including innovative new products being launched and the significant impact mergers and acquisitions have already had on our distributors and suppliers.  We have assigned our writers to take an even deeper look into this, and tedmag.com will be building stories to help you bridge the gap between sales and marketing.

We also hope John Lorince accepts the invitation to come back to AdVenture next year. We can all use more insight from people like him.  Maybe he can get even more salespeople to come with him.


Contact us today for a free, no obligation consultation.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

Read More

Why Great Web Design & Web Development Never Ends

Tue, Aug 16, 2016 @ 10:00 AM / by Myke Amend posted in Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Web Design Company, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Internet Development, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Marketing, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Website Design Company, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Featured, Web Design

0 Comments


Your new web design or web development project is finished... or is it?

Web Design GraphicIn a sense, maybe your web design or web redesign project is coming to a close. You've covered everything that is within scope, satisfied every need that was laid out in the project planning, web design quote, or purchase order. The end of project meeting answered all remaining questions, employees were trained on how to use and manage their new website, and it looks like you can call this a job well done and *finally!* launch your new corporate website.

From here, ideally, your new site will impress visitors, generate new leads, make sales, and yield much better search results. You finally have a site that is well-optimized for search by today's standards, including being responsive/mobile-friendly. You even made sure to make it a secure (HTTPS/SSL) site.

Yep, your site is completely, at this very moment, modern and will serve you well for 2 to 5 years, until you need to completely replace it again, as business from the site begins to slow, and visitor counts dwindle...

and when that time comes, you may wonder...

"Our last web design is only a few years old, why is this happening?"

Here are some of the most common reasons a great website can fail over time:

Website Missed Maintenance Issues:

Like all business equipment, from large industrial machinery, to company cars, to copiers, websites need to be maintained to retain value. Most companies wouldn't let their vehicles go a year without changing the oil, but many companies allow their websites go to seed, creating a cycle of time and revenue lost for need of emergency patches, leading eventually into the need for a complete replacement.

  • Regular maintenance can help keep your site up to date with today's SEO standards. It is much harder (and more costly) to recover lost search position than it is to maintain and improve the ranking of your web site. Losing revenue all the way up to that point makes this decision even less affordable.
  • Regular maintenance can defend against hacks, malware, blackhat SEO and other factors that might harm your ranking. Regaining ranking after your web site loses search placement and is indexed with a "this site may be harmful to your computer", is often extremely difficult, and costly. Regaining placement lost to spammers and black hat SEO is also difficult.
  • Regular Maintenance can keep your web presence in all available markets. As new devices are created and released, as monitor sizes increase or shrink, as screen resolutions become sharper, as internet speeds increase, as devices from servers to smart watches become faster - you should want your web site design to be accessible to as many people on as many devices as possible. Regularly look in on your website, from multiple devices, and try to always consider devices that you may be leaving out.
  • Regular Maintenance can allow you to detect and fix broken links, broken contact forms, and other lost functionality before you lose business from it. Sometimes web hosts upgrade their software, or tighten up their security. This can cause a site to break. You do not know the web host made changes to the environment. Your web host does not know that your site or some part of your site broke as a result. Often, by the time a potential customer contacts a company about a broken website, or broken web page, weeks, even months have gone by. In this time, hundreds of other visitors have simply gone elsewhere. The question "How long has this been broken?", can lead to revelations about business slowdown you do not want to have.
  • Great sites come from evolution, not as pre-packaged solutions. Fully replacing an old site can be necessary if too much time has passed since the last time it was worked on, but the best very sites are sites that are regularly retuned and refined to keep up with current needs and standards. You invested a lot of money in your new build. Maintenance could mean no more major rebuilds, less cost over time, and much better results.

 

example of a fully mobile responsive design for all devices
Example of a website designed for widescreen, desktop, laptop, tablet, and cell phone.

 

Website Disuse issues:

Inbound Marketing is one of the most important aspects of good Web DesignThis mistake, in recent times of Wordpress and other types of CMS (Content Management Systems) being the standard, in more-recent times of search providers giving preference to regularly-updated sites, can be just as harmful as the former. As even the best equipment can become rusty when negelcted, so can your web presence.

  • Regular content updates help your search presence and can help your site-wide keyword saturation. Google, and other search engines prefer sites that they know are being maintained. Fresh content shows Google that the site is an actively growing site, not an abandoned site that is only still living because of pre-paid hosting, or that someone forgot to pull the plug. Since people who are searching are most-often in search of up-to-date information - search engines try to search up the most up-todate content and web sites.
  • Regular updates can extend the size of your site, and build its footprint on the web. Whether you are blogging, adding new pages, or extending the content of existing pages (perhaps breaking content up into more subpages), you are gaining more chances to be indexed and seen, building keywords for your site, expanding the size of your net.
  • Stasis is death. While your site is not growing - your competitors sites may be. Worse: while you are failing to build new links to your site, you are most likely losing links as well. Backlinks are still the number one factor in determining search ranking. As sites, pages, and articles that were linking to you disappear, are edited, or are archived, you are losing inbound links. Companies that are regularly building links tend not to notice, but when you stop building, these losses are hard to ignore.
  • Disuse IS Misuse. If you are not using your website as an effective marketing tool, it becomes only about as handy as a business card or a listing in the whitepages. If customers need to already know you exist in order to find your web site, you might as well be sticking to brochures and pamphlets. A good inbound marketing campaign identifies visitors, turns visitors into leads, and nurtures leads into happy customers.
  • Without a good marketing plan, clicks and visits are merely numbers. Purchasing ads online and in print are great ways to bring visitors to your site. Mailers, magazine advertising, eNewsletter advertising, directory placements, technical articles, and advertorials are also great ways to drive traffic. If you are doing these things, but have no marketing strategy and no marketing automation in place for your website, you are simply wasting your advertising dollars and efforts.

If your company does not have its own marketing staff, if you do not have your own staff of net technicians, web developers, or graphic designers, Lohre and Associates can help with your short term or long term marketing and web development needs.

If you would like to save money on coordinating advertising efforts between multiple advertising and marketing services, Lohre and Associates would love to help. As Cincinnati's full-service industrial advertising and marketing agency, we do it all.

Contact us today for a free, no obligation consultation.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

Read More

Redesigning a Website to be Mobile-Friendly on a Budget

Thu, Jun 09, 2016 @ 03:02 PM / by Myke Amend posted in Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Web Design Company, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Internet Development, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Website Design Company, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Advertising Agency, Web Design

0 Comments


Website Redesign Does Not, Should Not Always Mean Replacement:

We all know how increasingly important having a mobile-friendly website has become to search engine placement, but for many reasons, a company might not be ready, or able to do a complete overhaul of an antiquated website or website design.

I am going to go over a few ways a company can hold onto the site they have (as well as a few reasons they might want to) while quickly and inexpensively bringing their site into the 2010s with mobile-friendly styling.

Common reasons not to upgrade a website:

  • It is not in the budget: This might because money was already recently put into a new website design, or that the ideal and perfect website for the company will require more capital than is currently available.
  • There isn't time: Funding aside, major web development tends to require time from the client for gathering promotional literature and other collateral materials, approving designs, flow charts/site maps, discussions on what the new website should be able to do. When it comes to building a new website, some level of collaboration is necessary.
  • Google and other search engines really like old sites: It is true that the older a website is, the more reliable the website appears to search, but one must also consider that regularly-updated sites are also favorable. The perfect mix, we've found, is having a site with an old domain, and regularly updating it.


Rome wasn't built in a day - Good websites also take time.

The very best sites are not made in a day, or even a month - The best websites are the product of years or more of regular updates and upgrades, close attention to not creating broken links in the process, and minor design improvements made regularly. This is especially true when it comes to SEO.

Coming from an artist who has spent over 20 years as a web developer, over a decade more doing graphic design, and an entire lifetime creating fine art: There really is something to be said for works that have had a lot of time, passion, and care for detail put into them. This level of attention to detail does not happen with purchased templates, it does not come with even the largest budget for website redesign. Sure, it can begin there, but the very best websites come from many, many minor changes.

As important as it is to regularly update your CMS (content management system) software, update plugins, check your site's and servers security, check for broken links, create new blog posts, create new pages, create other content, check directories and other inbound links - making regular minor changes to design, function, and architecture is what brings a website ever-closer to perfect.

"Minor changes"?? Making our website mobile-friendly is a huge undertaking!!

It is easy to think this. Your site might have a lot of pages... hundreds, even thousands. You might even have several different templates for several different types of pages within your site. Your site might even be built on an older/outdated CMS, a long-extinct version of one, or something completely proprietary and unsupported **

Regardless of the type of server you are running on, whether your pages are php, asp, HTML, regardless of what CMS you are using or how old your site is, the end result is that all web site pages are outputted as some sort of HTML, the language a web-browser reads to present a web page for your viewing, and all HTML is, or rather should be formatted with stylesheets - which are all some form of CSS.

Restyling/Redesigning the website to work well with mobile from here is mostly a matter of adding of taking these steps:

  • Adding the viewport meta tag to the header is the first thing I do: Re sizing my browser, I can see how the site and its pages are going to look at different widths, but for a lot of mobile devices the site will not present the same without this tag, which can be easily forgotten.
  • Use media queries within the css to make the web pages and their elements behave differently at different screen sizes: This is mostly a matter of making sure all elements (images, layers, paragraphs) have a max-width of 100% or less (including their margins, borders, and sometimes padding), and that their contents will not overflow those boundaries (by declaring how to treat overflow).
  • Make sure things fall properly into line: Images, layers, and paragraphs ideally should, most-often each take up the full width of a mobile device. I tend to make elements expand to this size, then add  "clear: both" and "float: none" to their styling.
  • Make sure they fall into the proper order: Things that were floating left end up above the elements that were to their right, this is not always the best order for viewing. Sometimes element a, b, and c need to be read top-to-bottom as c, b, and a. To address this, I tend to go the Flex/ Flex-flow/Order method, but this and a number of other methods are covered in this stack overflow thread.
  • Make a simple mobile menu/thumb menu: You need only use CSS to do this. A very simple drop down thumb menu can be found here, on Medialoot. Sometimes, especially if there are few pages, it is even more simple. For both Dynamic Industries (large scale machining) and Vertiflo Pump Company (vertical submersible centrifugal pumps), I didn't even make a thumb menu - I simply made it so that menu items fell into new rows, evenly, and gave them a layered tab appearance on mobile devices.

Mobile-friendly Website redesign for Dynamic IndustriesMobile-friendly Website redesign for Dynamic Industries

Above (left and right) The pages of this standard HTML site were given a mobile-friendly re-design through simple CSS styling changes. A mobile menu was also added simply by re-styling the existing links/navigation

Foreseeable difficulties:

For a lot of older, really older sites, or for sites that were designed by people with limited design knowledge, or no design knowledge at all, these are some common snags run into:

  • The website, site pages, or site content were created in MS Word: The result of this is a massively huge file, horribly coded, and especially badly-coded for trying to restyle with CSS. There is a large amount of proprietary code in there, and unique styles are applied to most every element, if not each and every character. There are a number of ways to clean this up, I am not going to recommend any of them in particular (but advise you try several of the free ones first).
  • There is no CSS style sheet, and there are no CSS styles applied: Actually, often this is even better - it means that you will not be fighting competing style declarations and addressing most things element by element. CSS will override HTML in most cases (unless there is inline CSS). Just attach a stylesheet to the pages or template and work from there.
  • There are inline styles for a number of elements or for every element: I really hate to use it, but if a very object-specific CSS declaration won't do, you can use "!important" at the end of your declarations to override these. Use them sparingly. If all else fails, any good text editor with "find/replace" can possibly be used (locally) to remove these as you find them. If these inline styles are used within post and page content, a good find/replace plugin might be available for your CMS. If it is Wordpress, I use "Better Search/Replace".
  • Tables??... who still uses tables?? A decade after most designers should have stopped using them, they are still a fairly common thing. Sometimes, they are even necessary... at least until Mozilla Firefox starts handling flex correctly. Though tables are something to be avoided for layout, they are still handy as far as what they were intended for: Displaying specs and data. Generally, if tables are used to layout content, I break them apart with "display: block; overflow: hidden; float: none; clear: both;" and then work on the styling from there. Since a majority of our clients are Industrial, and more specifically: in the process industry tables filled with data are pretty common. I use CSS to break lines and to rotate the table headers at smaller sizes, like so (LEFT/top: normal website view of the table, RIGHT/bottom: Mobile website view of the table):

Website Design: Table Rotation example 1web-design-table-rotation.png

 

So... Why are we doing this again?

1. Search engines now favor mobile-friendly websites.

2. Content that is mobile-friendly reaches a wider audience/is more accessible.

3. Content that is mobile-friendly is more likely to be shared, if only because of the wider audience provided by being mobile-friendly and having better search placement.

4. It is actually not as hard as it might seem:

I know it might seem like a lot of work, all of these steps might not be necessary, and taking these steps could get help your website by in the mean time, and possibly for a while - maybe much longer if the website is regularly kept up to date with internet standards. It is also often easier, and more cost-effective to maintain a website than it is to completely replace it. Making your website mobile-friendly will put you back on the right path.

These changes, are changes that should be applied over a handful of days, and improved upon as time goes by. If you do not have a web designer who is capable of doing this in this time frame, we'd be happy to help - Just contact us.

Making a website mobile-friendly is very important in that Google and other search providers use this as a standard when giving search placement. If you also consider that an increasing amount of website visitors are using cellphones or other mobile devices, and that this portion of visitors and potential visitors is fast-becoming the majority, you know that not having a mobile-friendly site is like being on only a very small portion of the internet. It is not a very nice thing to do to yourself, your company, or all those who might wish to be connected with your product or service.

 

 

 


** In the latter case: Yes, I would suggest some sort of overhaul - because any CMS or plugin version even an hour old might have some exploit or other vulnerability that will end in your site being loaded with malware and pharmaceutical ads, if it is not already. I won't go into that here, You can read more about that here, for the sake of this article I am going to assume your site is secure and sound against these things.

Read More

Lohre & Assoc. Welcomes Noted Artist and Web Designer Myke Amend to its Team

Tue, Sep 29, 2015 @ 02:09 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Website Design, Advertising, Graphic Design, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, Graphic Design Agency, illustration, web development, Website Design Company, Design Agency, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Advertising Agency, Web Design

0 Comments

Web Design and Web Development Guru, Grphic Artist and Graphic Designer, Myke AmendCincinnati native Myke Amend recently joined Lohre & Associates, the Over-the-Rhine-based marketing communications agency, fulltime as Web Design & Internet Development creative officer. Amend has worked with Lohre for the past 10 years as a web designer and web developer on a freelance basis from Grand Rapids, Mich.

Amend, who returns to Cincinnati for the new position, brings two decades experience as a graphic designer, web designer, programmer, and Internet developer, working on a variety of business-to-business and consumer accounts. Additionally, Amend is an illustrator, engraver and painter, whose work has been commissioned by other artists in film, music and literature.

“We’re very excited to have Myke working with us,” says Chuck Lohre, president, “He brings the creativity and skills of a fine artist, with his vast digital expertise. It’s a perfect combination for our agency, which is known for creative solutions to the wide variety of branding, strategy and digital implementation projects we handle for our clients.”

Adds Amend, “It’s gratifying to know Chuck and his team of designers, writers, strategists and brand experts welcome the years of experience I bring from fine arts with the in-demand digital know-how. I’m excited to develop ways we can continue to solve challenges for the companies who have looked to Lohre for ways to set them apart from their competitors.”

Amend’s illustrations have been featured in “Weird Tales” magazine, “Beneath Ceaseless Skies,” “Gatehouse Gazette,” “Kilter” magazine, “Gothic Beauty” magazine, the art collection “Gothic Art Now,” the art collection “Vampire Art Now,” the “Airship Pirates RPG” and many more print publications as well as popular online resources such as “IO9,” “Elfwood,” “Dark Roasted Blend,” “Fantasy Art” magazine, “Lines and Colors,” “Brass Goggles,” “Gawker, “BoingBoing.” His work has also been featured on the sites of literary creatives including Warren Ellis, Thomas Ligotti, Neil Gaiman and Clive Barker.

Additionally Dexter Palmer, Cherie Priest, The Pickled Brothers Sideshow, Vernian Process, Veronique Chevalier, the Borgia Popes, Automaton, Abney Park and others have commissioned Amend for works. He is often a special guest of art, horror and steampunk conventions. He also works in sculpture and kinetic art, most notably having created a 4000-lb. solar and wind-powered rotating mural and 3D work called “the Infernal Device,” which was displayed at the Gerald R. Ford Museum for ArtPrize 2011.

In between Myke has filled his time working on ModelARestorers.org, as sole designer, webmaster, and server admin of a site serving 180 chapters Worldwide, creating advertising art for Disney Fine Art Gallery, and of course working for Lohre and Associates, for whom he now works full time.

Read More

Create a Customer Path with Web Design using Website Marketing Communications

Thu, Apr 18, 2013 @ 02:03 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in SEO - search engine optimization, Internet Marketing, Industrial Search Engine Optimization - SEO, Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Internet Development, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Web Design

0 Comments

10 steps to make your marketing communications' site focused on guiding visitors.

  1. Sign out of Google. If you have a Google account for email, news, YouTube, etc.; Google remembers your preferences and shows you those sites when you search on similar keywords. You'll never see what the visitor sees if you let Google show you pages you've been to before. Pick your buyer persona category and search on the terms they would. Put them in order of the number of results. That will tell you the hierarchy of your site design.
  2. Arrange your first page of Google print outs in order of the number of results. You'll see the level of importance you need to apply to your web site design. It's like a path through the woods. As someone goes down into your site they will learn things more specific to their needs.Web Site Design Strategy for Marketing Communications
  3. Now refine the content to match the journey. Many benefits and features of your product will be the same for all your products. We'll get those out of the way first and include them on the first page. More specific features and benefits will be the content as your visitor drills down.
  4. Determine what pages you want to show in your menu. Some content will be very similar because of slightly different search terms. You don't have to show all those pages in your menu. Design the submenu you will place on these category pages.
  5. Write the content. Pay close attention to the keywords used on competitor pages. They will give you clues as to industry buzzwords and content you might have missed. Add some links to other more technical material the visitor can access. Conclude with a Call To Action.
  6. Design the pages. Here we need to get our images together. Be sure to use alternative text captions. The best site page arrangement is a "Z." The eye starts in the upper left, goes across the page, down to the lower left and finally to the lower right. In this case a simple four square will do it: Photo, benefit/feature bullets, learn more, call to action. The "learn more" pages can be a simple headline and content. The Call To Action pages will be a form to encourage communication such as a phone consultation or plant visit.
  7. Post the subsite pages.
  8. Study Google Analytics.
  9. Make adjustments.
  10. Benchmark results.
Web Site Design Strategy for Marketing Communications

Google search results help design the hierarchy of your website. The pages with more search results should be at the upper level of your site. Those with lower numbers of search results will be after the drill down. These search terms need to be your product categories. And you will have to juggle them if what's important to you isn't very important to the internet. In this example all milling machine tools can drill and bore. That's why drilling and boring are secondary to milling. All CNC (Computer Numeric Controlled) machine tools are later versions of NC (Numerically Controlled) by computer tape. We use this historic hierarchy for example only.

 

Z eye pattern for Web Design for Marketing Communications

Here's an example of the "Z" eye pattern from Open Source Marketer, "While building a new website for a large corporate client, the VP of Marketing asked me to justify why I chose to put the website navigation on the right. Why would anyone choose to put the website navigation on the right instead of the left? This question was pure curiosity for him. He really didn’t have an opinion one-way or the other, he just wanted to know why I did what I did. Here’s why…The Gutenberg diagram (or Gutenberg Rule), This is an easy reference to where the western reader’s eyes will go. As western readers, we have been trained to read from left to right. So, online we naturally gravitate to a left-to-right pattern. No one disputes this fact, and in a moment we’ll see how it’s the root of all arguments."

Web Design and Marketing Hierarchy of Needs

Here is a good diagram for the way industrial marketing communications flow, from the solution to a process pain to connecting with a person that offers a solution. Learn more at this fun site that offered the diagram from a college admissions seminar, Hyped To Death.

Our industrial marketing communication flow might look like this:

  1. I have bug holes in my potable water concrete cistern
  2. Search on potable water cisterns
  3. Learn about concrete release agents
  4. Understand agents need to be certified for potable water
  5. Contact the supplier for a sample

After you have created these pages, optimize them according to our 10 Rules for SEO, and make them live, wait a few days and then check the results on Google Analytics. Look for high bounce rates and low time on page. It will take several weeks to get indexed by Google. Once they are, benchmark your results, rinse and repeat. Good luck.

If you would like assistance, either in your web site design, your hosting, your SEO, or your inbound marketing strategies, please contact us for a free web site development consultation. If you are unsure, please refer to our web design testimonials.


If you liked this blog post you might like, "10 Step: Process Equipment Website Marketing Communications Review."


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
Read More

10 Step: Process Equipment Web Design and Website Marketing Communications

Fri, Apr 12, 2013 @ 09:51 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing Communications, Email Marketing and Advertising, Inbound Marketing, Industrial Advertising, SEO - search engine optimization, Internet Marketing, Industrial Website Design, Website Design, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Web Design Company, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Business to Business Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies, Web Design

0 Comments

Applying best practices to chemical and food processing equipment website marketing communications.

  1. Review your site's SEO (Search Enegine Optimization) and Pay-Per-Click
  2. Review your email newsletter strategy
  3. Review your web design for visitor anxiety
  4. Understanding buyer personas
  5. Site architecture for encouraging longer visits
  6. Google analytics
  7. Competitive comparisons
  8. Social media
  9. Content strategy
  10. Retargeting

Review your site's SEO and Pay-Per-Click

Web design for Website Marketing Communications

We use Web Position Gold to analyze positions of keywords but there isn't any better way than to do it manually. Remember to sign out so the search engines don't send you to the pages you regularly visit. Also while you are searching, you can observe competitors, AdWord positions, related industries for adding negative keywords and whatever else pops up. Baidu is the most popular search engine in China and Yandex in Russia.

Review your email newsletter strategy

Email newsletter design for Website Marketing Communications

Email newsletters, like blogs, are the core of your growing content. This company follows a consistent pattern: Technical tips, application story and a product review. Hubspot has some great pointers to follow.

Review your site design for visitor anxiety

Web Design for Website Marketing Communications

Every page must focus on one communication point. If content isn't contributing to the communication get rid of it. Every visitor is asking himself three questions: 1. Is this what I'm looking for?, 2. How can I learn more, 3. Where can I find what I'm looking for? The page on the left was our old site home page, cluttered and confusing. The page on the right is our new Hubspot site home page, simple and engaging. You don't need to give visitors's choices until they need them.

Understanding buyer personas

 Web Design examples for Website Marketing Communications

Chemical and food processing includes all sorts of liquids and powders. These visitors are engineers, technical operators, managers, and administrators. Sure, many of the visitors may be inexperienced amateurs or students, but they all are trying to solve a processing problem. These include variables like volume, ambient conditions, processing speed, quality considerations, and many special problems. These examples illustrate a common solution, show a pictural index of product and applications.

Site architecture for encouraging longer visits

Web Design Examples for Website Marketing Communications

The only way to keep pages simple and offer a large amount of content is to have the content change according to the path a visitor travels on your site. This machine tool manufacturer is a great example. In this case the path was: home > manufacturing > products > type. Breadcrumbs (site content that shows how you got to the page) are a good way to help the visitor remember their journey.

Google analytics

 Google Analytics view for Website Marketing Communications

Similar Web is a great comparison site that illustrated many of the things you can learn on Google Analytics. Study your bounce rate (percent of visitors that leave after that page), pageviews and time on page. Don't worry if your home page has a high bounce rate, 20 percent of your visitors went there to get your phone number.

Competitive comparisons

Website comparison for Website Marketing Communications

There are numerous ways to compare your site to competitors, but remember to measure ROI. The internet is but one part of the marketing communication mix. As you can see from this comparison, Twitter isn't important, one company has a huge Facebook following but they are owned by a marketing company. They all have room for improvement.

Social media

Social Media for Website Marketing Communications

Newsgroups, list servers, industry forums and LinkedIn forums are the only important social media for processing equipment marketing. Facebook might make for a great company newsletter, but it can't begin to answer the technical questions serious marketing communications must focus on. We won't go into Pinterest, Instagram or Reddit. Google+ is growing because you can post to select groups.

Content strategy

Web Design Content Strategy for Website Marketing Communications

The foundation of the new internet success strategy is content. Massive amounts. But it must be serious, coordinated and buyer persona focused. Then it's called inbound marketing. Once you start to look at your different visitors it will become easier to edit content and add better content.

Retargeting

Retargeting examples for Website Marketing Communications

Finally, investigate new targeted marketing communications opportunities. Retargeting banner ads shows visitors ads based on the sites they have visited. In this case we were studying fire suppression systems and that's why an ad came up when we were reading "Grist." Like AdWords, you pay only when the visitor clicks. Finally, industrial advertising has some real estate again.

 


If you found this post interesting, you may also like Why Blogging is the #1 Marketing Communication for Sales Leads

Sales Lead Generation Guide by Cincinnati Marketing Agency Lohre & Associates
Read More

Xavier University Hires Cincinnati Agency, Lohre & Assoc. for PR and Social Media

Sat, Dec 15, 2012 @ 01:29 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing Communications, Cincinnati, Public Relations PR, Industrial Public Relations PR, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, Cincinnati Advertising, Business to Business Advertising, Cincinnati PR Agencies, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Cincinnati public relations, Cincinnati Advertising Agencies

0 Comments

images

Lohre & Assoc. selected as public relations and social media firm for Xavier University American Dream Composite Index

Hello fellow forward thinkers,

Here's exciting news for marketers. This new economic index will provide vital information to decision makers in marketing and management for the construction industry, manufacturing, natural resources and consumer goods. Lohre & Associates along with the O'Keeffe Company has been retained to provide the latest in internet publicity and social media marketing. Scott Hasson is the account executive on the campaign. For more information on subscriptions or becoming a sponsor, please contact us. The release follows:

Xavier University’s American Dream Composite Index™ (ADCI) Helps Businesses and Policy Makers Target Their Marketing Dollars

CINCINNATI—Xavier University’s Williams College of Business launches the American Dream Composite Index™ (ADCI), the only statistically validated measure of the American Dream and a predictor of future consumer behavior. Visit www.xavier.edu/adci for detailed information regarding the values of the ADCI, its dimensions, and methodology.

Xavier will host a 30-minute webinar about the ADCI at 1:30 pm EST on October 10. Visit http://meet32018046.adobeconnect.com/adci1/event/registration.html to register.

The ADCI reveals the extent to which people living in the U.S. achieve the American Dream, and allows organizations in many fields, including but not limited to, housing, automotive, finance, insurance, retail, and policy, to understand consumer behavior and sentiment that paints a comprehensive picture of American society. The ADCI is based on a survey administered to a randomly stratified national sample of at least 1,000 adults representative of the U.S. population. By tracking different dimensions of the ADCI, businesses can adapt their operations, capital expenditure, employment, marketing, and other decisions affecting their bottom lines.

Researchers at Xavier have quantified the American Dream based on 35 dimensions which include: economic factors such as home ownership, financial security, and job characteristics; personal well-being factors such as family and friends, leisure, and happiness; societal factors such as trust in government, justice, civic participation; diversity factors; and the physical environment.

In addition to the ADCI, five additional sub-indices are provided, namely, the American Dream Economic Index™, the American Dream Well-Being Index™, the American Dream Societal Index™, the American Dream Diversity Index™, and the American Dream Environment Index™.

Monthly subscribers receive index access prior to the public release of the data, and can customize the information based on demographic details. Monthly subscriptions to the ADCI are now available for corporate, non-profit, government and other organizational use. To learn more about the ADCI monthly subscriptions and customized offerings, please visit www.xavier.edu/adci.

Xavier University, a private Catholic university located in Cincinnati, Ohio, provides a liberal arts education in the Jesuit tradition. Founded in 1831, the university is the sixth-oldest Catholic university in the nation. U.S. News & World Report ranks it fourth among master’s-level universities in the Midwest. Learn more at www.xavier.edu.

###

Read More