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Society for Marketing Professional Services - Certified Professional Services Marketer Study Guide Epiphany

Thu, Nov 23, 2017 @ 12:01 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Building Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Business to Consumer Marketing

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The last case study activity gives an excellent overview of the entire process for studying for the exam.

I've been studying for the Certified Proffessional Services Marketer exam ever since I joined SMPS in 2004. I wanted to grow the agency in the building industry and on the advice of Pete Strange, the president of Messer Construction, I joined SMPS. He said it was the best way to get into marketing into the AEC space.

I joined and was accepted quickly into the group by a great bunch of marketers for local architectural, construction and engineering companies. Served on the board under Alison Tepe Guy and Jason Ulmenstine for a few terms. It was going well, and I was learning a lot until the market crashed in 2008. Nearly 50 percent of the professionals in the industry were out of a job.

I put studying for the exam on the back burner in lew of passing the U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional exam and getting my office awarded LEED Platinum in 2011.

This type of marketing is much more closely aligned with the type of industrial marketing Lohre & Associates has been doing my entire 40-year career; large, expensive mining, chemical, electrical and mechanical machinery. Selling the design and construction of a building is very similar.

After several failed attempts to properly study for the exam, this year the local chapter, led by Melissa Lutz of Champlin Architecture, developed a study group and incentives to pass the exam by the end of the year. It's crunch time and I'm working hard to re-read and absorb all the materials to pass the exam. The building industry has finally recovered and there are excellent opportunities to do more work in this industry.

The exam is broken up into six different domains: Marketing Research, Marketing Planning, Client & Business Development, Proposals, Promotional Activity, and Management. It was after the last page of the last book that the whole field came into focus for me. I'm going to use that case study as a jumping off point to write about the entire Markendium as SMPS calls it and hopefully hard wire the knowledge in my brain to pass the exam.

The epiphany came when I realized that all of industrial marketing comes down to people. Marketers are the ones that research other people, plan to reach other people, learn to engage with other people, make proposals for people, plan activities and manage people.

Everything about industrial marketing revolves around this simple case study that follows the path of a successful young college graduate that gets recognized and becomes a leader. That's what I want to do. Just goes to show you are never too old, 64, to learn something.

Certified-Professional-Services-Marketer-1.jpg

From the Markendium:

"This Case Study Activity allows you to reflect on and apply the key concepts that you learned in this Domain to a real-world scenario.

Each Domain includes a scenario about the same organization, Gilmore & Associates. The scenario is presented to you, followed by several questions. You can also elect to view the recommended solutions/ responses for each question posed, which are located on the next page. This case study can be used in many ways:

You can individually reflect on the questions after reading the scenario, and write your own notes/responses to each question. You can then check your ability to apply the key concepts against the recommended solutions/responses.

You can pull together a small group and use this scenario to drive a discussion around the challenge and to discuss solutions as a group.

You can combine a selection of the case study activities (across the Domains) into a larger scenario-based activity as a part of a professional development event."

I like the Markendium because it makes you think about the process of marketing. There is no right or wrong answer in many cases. Only different ways to approach the problem. The following is from the study guide.

"THE CPSM EDUCATIONAL PROCESS On the CPSM examination, there is only one answer that is most correct for each test question. The CPSM candidate must identify the answer generally accepted as a best practice or expose the commonly held misconception.

How Is a Best Practice Defined? A best practice is a process, technique, or use of resources with a proven record of success that becomes a standard or benchmark to which similar practices are compared. In the context of the CPSM program, the designation best practice will be applied when:

ƒthe best practice is ethical ƒ

the practice is found in current research-based literature or scholarly writing ƒ

the practice is adapted from current business literature and is tried and true in the professional services marketing field ƒ

the practice is recognized by SMPS in its own literature and publications

How Does a Candidate Recognize a Commonly Held Misconception? A commonly held misconception is an incorrect belief or opinion that results from a lack of understanding or knowledge is shared by many people. The problem inherent in this definition is, “We don’t know what we don’t know.” How do you discern if your practices of and beliefs about professional services marketing are generally accepted as best practices or commonly held misconceptions? It is often difficult to recognize when the literature is suggesting something different than what we believe or do because our brains filter the information we take in to notice the things that affirm we are right rather than to process the things that are contrary to what we believe. Learning occurs when we recognize there is a gap in knowledge or performance.

We learn when we attempt to solve problems. We also learn when we bump up against information that is obviously contrary to our belief, particularly when our own performance is under scrutiny. We learn when we discover that respected peers think differently than we do. Mostly, we learn through self-reflection, as we analyze and synthesize information and experiences to solve a problem. This study guide integrates those key elements for professional services marketer learning: self-reflection, bumping up against gaps in knowledge or performance, and understanding how other professional services marketers think. Your job as you prepare for the CPSM exam is NOT to defend that your way is the right or best way but rather to recognize that there are always alternative ways to address a challenge and to choose the more correct option given most of the time in a group of your educated, well-read peers."

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7 Tips for the One-Person Marketing Team

Wed, Nov 22, 2017 @ 01:19 PM / by Sarah Seward posted in Green Building Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Business to Consumer Marketing

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We're a big fan of TREW, here's their latest blog post by Sarah Seward, enjoy!

Before joining the TREW Crew, I spent three years working in-house as the one and only member of the marketing department. When you’re responsible for all the marketing tasks for a company, it can be overwhelming and daunting at times, so here are seven tips to make your job easier.

1. Develop an easy-to-follow marketing strategy

As the lone marketer in your company, organization is key to your success. Develop a comprehensive and easy-to-follow marketing strategy. Start by coming up with SMART goals for the year.

Do your research on marketing trends in your industry so you can decide if you want to focus your efforts on blogging, social media, email marketing, website development, trade shows, advertising, etc. As a one-person marketing team, you will need to prioritize what marketing route you take because you won’t be able to do everything on your own.

Sit down and develop a marketing strategy that details your marketing tasks for each quarter, month and week. For example, you can set a goal to create a blog post each week, a case study every month, and a new whitepaper or video every quarter. Figure out what cadence works best for you and your company when developing these tasks.

2. Create a content and social media calendar

With your content plan all mapped out for the year, create a content calendar to keep yourself organized and on–track. You can easily create this in Microsoft Excel. You can make your content calendar as detailed or simple as you want. Categories to include in your content calendar are:

  • Focused keyword
  • Content type
  • Audience Persona
  • Due Date
  • Author
  • Reviewer
  • Sales funnel position

content calendar .jpeg

Here's an example of a content calendar

With all the content you are producing, you should share all your content marketing efforts on social media. To help yourself stay organized, you can also create a social media post calendar where you can detail what posts you will share and when.

As a solo marketing department, these calendars will help lay the foundation for success and keep you organized all year.

3. Automate as much as you can

Being the only person in marketing for your organization means that you must get everything done yourself. Marketing automation is your best friend.

In this day and age, you can schedule emails, blog posts and social media posts ahead of time. This makes completing these smaller tasks quick and easy, and you won't have to worry about pausing your day to post on LinkedIn.

For social media scheduling, you have lots of good options such as Hootsuite or Buffer. HubSpot offers social media management and scheduling for those with the Basic membership and up.

Most email marketing softwares allow you to schedule your marketing emails. You can also upgrade your subscription to send automatic emails to users who complete a form on your website. This again saves you time because you don't have to personally reach out to every person who comes to your website.

You can also save time by scheduling out your blog posts in your content mangagement system. HubSpot and WordPress both give users the ability to choose when a blog post is scheduled.

4. Ask for help producing content

Your marketing department shouldn't be the only ones creating blogs. Your company is filled with people who are experts on your services and products. Reach out to these technical experts to have them write a blog post. You can have them do a simple Q&A blog post if you get resistance. For those with competitive co-workers, make it a contest by handing out prizes for those whose blog posts do the best based on website data.

You also shouldn't feel like every blog post should align with a service. Show off your company's culture by writing blog posts on after-work events, new employees, or different hobbies your co-workers have. This will show you as an authentic company that people want to do business with.

5. Attend marketing conferences to help

When you're all alone in your own department, you miss collaborating with other marketing professionals. I started attending local marketing conferences to learn from sessions how to do my job better.

I ended up finding that the best advice and tidbits came from networking during lunch or in between sessions. Questions like 'which marketing software do you use' or 'how did you get buy-in from management on a website redesign' helped inform me and lead my marketing strategy.

I would highly suggest you get out of the office for a day or two to attend a conference full of marketers struggling with the same things you are. Look for local marketing events and think about joining a marketing orgzanization, like AMA, that has local chapters. If you can get approval, go to Content Marketing Worldor INBOUND. These opportunities will help you go back to the office inspired and with new ideas.

6. Read marketing blogs and books

As much as marketing conferences helped me, so did marketing blogs and books. I started subscribing to marketing blogs because I needed to figure out our marketing strategy and stay on top of trends. Content from Yoast, Moz, HubSpot, CCO, and others helped me bring leads into our website using content marketing and SEO best practices.

As far as marketing books, I read books such as Value Proposition Design, The Long Tail, and Everybody Writes. But for me, the book that finally connected the light bulb in my head on technical marketing was Smart Marketing for Engineers. This book was written for the lone marketers at technical companies and it will give you everything you need to fill your marketing and sales funnels.

One-Person-Marketing-Team.jpg

Here's my copy of Smart Marketing for Engineers with pages falling out of it because I've read it so much. 

7. Bring in expert help

As the lone marketer for a company, I used to feel intimidated and a little threatened by marketing firms asking me if I needed any help. Now, I wish I would have reached out for help on marketing strategy or a website redesign instead of feeling like I had to do everything on my own.

You should also think about hiring a freelance technical writer or an on-call website developer to help you from time to time. Building a successful marketing department takes collaboration and support from other marketing professionals.

Are you interested in learning more about developing a technical marketing strategy? Download our eBook  to start building your 2018 marketing strategy. 

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2018 Industrial Advertising & PR Plan

Fri, Oct 27, 2017 @ 04:19 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Building Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Business to Consumer Marketing, Business to Consumer Advertising, editorial calendar, public relations planning, industrial advertising plan

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Technical Article for Feintool Public Relations

Technical article in Forging Magazine

Good Technical Articles are Often More Valuable than Ads

We hear a lot about content marketing and social media (and we believe in it), but in the industrial marketing and industrial public relations world we have always been about content marketing.

We cover the entire spectrum, from print ads to web development to social media - our public relations campaigns utilize all of the working parts to get very the best results.

The fact is that ads and PR have to work together. You have to pay for your free press. We typically have two or three key publications in each market that we schedule advertising in as well as supply them with technical articles. We then repurpose those articles into emails, webinars and videos. Rinse and repeat.

We cast a wider net for our PR placements but at least purchase listings in their Buyers' Guides and Directories. That also provides high-value web site links to our clients' home pages.

Some of our clients like print and some like online only but all pay a lot of attention to their industrial advertising & PR plan.

WIN BIG WITH TECHNICAL ARTICLES
 

Public Relations Technical Article for SKF

  

SKF Precision Technologies

"We retain Chuck on a monthly basis, under a fixed fee, to generate PR and keep Gilman in the news. The value of the PR we receive, is typically two to three times the investment we make in space advertising."

-Tom Klahorst
Vice President, Sales,
SKF Precision Technologies, a unit of SKF USA Inc.,
Grafton, Wisc. (Formerly Russell T. Gilman, Inc.)

SEEPEX INC.

"It is a pleasure to offer this recommendation for Lohre and Associates, a marketing consultant and media producer in southwestern Ohio.  seepex, Inc. has used their services several times and has always been satisfied with the results. 

They were used to adapt and place case history articles in trade publications and produce several high-quality graphic designs for use in a number of media, including print, web sites and electronic promotions.

Their experience with our industrial marketing publications, the technical language of the industry and personal relationships with the editors and publishers assisted us in receiving excellent placements and results.  We are sure that you will be satisfied with the results that they produce.

Best regards,

signature, Michael L. Dillon, President of Seepex, Inc. - Cincinnati Public Relations Client

- Michael L. Dillon
President, seepex inc.

 Sales Lead Generation Guide by Cincinnati Marketing Agency Lohre & Associates

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"Catch Some Rays" with Your Mining Equipment Marketing "Battery!"

Fri, May 05, 2017 @ 04:32 PM / by Bill Langer posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Industrial Advertising, Marketing, Industrial Branding, Process Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Business to Business Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Process Equipment Marketing News Release

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Gravel Batteries - As green energy proponents address its intermittent nature, good old-fashioned gravel may provide a solution.


Renewable energy is becoming more and more popular these days. We recently jumped on the band wagon and had solar panels installed on our home in Anthem, Ariz. On average, we have 299 sunny days per year, so it is a pretty darn good investment.

The down side to energy from solar panels and wind turbines is their on-off nature. When the wind stops blowing or the sun stops shining, the energy production stops. That is not a problem for us, because we are still connected to the grid and can get power even when the sun doesn’t shine. But believe me — they know how to charge rate payers who have solar! 

Mining Equipment Marketing Fun.jpg 

In order to make solar and wind commercially viable, there needs to be some method to store excess energy production for use when there is no sunshine, no wind, or during peak demand. Electricity cannot be stored easily, but construction of a new battery gigafactory in the United States, as well as other high-tech methods on the horizon, may be part of the solution.
 
While we wait for new technology to catch on, there are some pretty good solutions already in place. Some environmen-tally friendly methods use — you guessed it — gravel. In terms of supply chain, handling, and construction, few materials are as cost effective, easy to obtain, and simple to use as gravel.
 
The most common method to store energy is pumped hydro storage. During excess solar or wind production periods, water is pumped uphill into a reservoir. During low or non-production periods, the water flows down through a generator to a lower reservoir. Very simple; very easy. However, hydro storage takes up a lot of space. An idea is being batted around where the water and reservoirs would be replaced by huge buckets filled with gravel. Excess energy produced will be used to haul the rock uphill in a ski-lift kind of contraption. When energy is needed, gravity will carry the rock downhill, producing electricity on its downhill trip.
 
There are a few somewhat more sophisticated ideas in the works, where excess energy is converted to thermal energy and then stored in giant gravel “batteries,” thus evening out the intermittent nature of wind turbines and solar panels.
 
One example is in Steinfurt, Germany. Rather than build an expensive tank, the battery is constructed underground in a covered pit. The storage material is a mixture of gravel and water. The side walls, top, and bottom are heat-insulated. The pit has a double-sided polypropylene liner with a vacuum control to identify leaks, and the liner is protected from the gravel by a layer of fleece.
 
When excess energy is available, heated water (195 degrees F) ‘charges’ the battery, either by direct water exchange (right side of the illustration) or via plastic pipes (left side of illustration). The hot water is stored until it is needed, at which time the water flow is reversed.
 
The use of rocks for thermal storage is attractive because rocks are not toxic, non-flammable, and inexpensive. The main problem I see with gravel batteries is convincing my wife to allow me to tear up our entire backyard landscaping and fish pond so I can replace it with a big hole filled with gravel and pipes. Is that really too much to ask? AM
 
Read the original article here in AGGREGATES MANAGER April 2017, thanks Bill for contributing to our Mining Equipment Marketing blog. Have a great weekend.

If you would like to learn more about writing a process equipment marketing news release or an application story "One key to good public relations is writing a case study."


 

Trade Display Designs by Lohre Advertising to Boost Presence and Impact

 

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Social Media Guidelines

Sat, Apr 08, 2017 @ 10:21 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Social Media Guidelines

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Socail-Media-Guidelines.jpg

(This week's post comes from the world of Burning Man, I went last year and learned a lot about how a community uses and polices social media. Just ran across this video of the Astec Dancers by fellow Earth Guardian Camp volunteer Martin Cline and on further research ran across their social media policies. I wanted to copy them here as an excellent set of guildlines for any company wanting to define their social media use for both their benefits and rules to prevent inproper use. Enjoy.)


These pages contain the Burning Man Project's policies, protocols and guidelines for the online activities of our staff and close volunteers, including the usage of official Burning Man email addresses, email lists, and social networking services in general.
 
As a staff member or volunteer for the Burning Man organization, you are expected to read and understand these policies.  Any questions or concerns about them should be directed to your manager, or to the Burning Man Communications Department.
 
1 Social Media Guidelines For Burning Man Staff
2 Acceptable Use of Burning Man Regional Email Lists
3 Acceptable Use of Burning Man Aliases and Email Addresses
4 Best Practices in the Use of Burning Man Email Lists
5 Acceptable Use of Burning Man Email Lists
 
Social Media Guidelines For Burning Man Staff
Last Update: December 2014
 
Burning Man recognizes that many of our staff members and close volunteers participate in social media services for their own personal use -- and often, to talk about Burning Man and their experiences within this culture. We feel this contributes to a richer voice about our culture, sharing an important story that we very much want to see accessible in the world.
 
And so to help you, our culture's leaders, to engage in with social networks and online communication without inadvertently causing any undue harm to the Burning Man Project or your fellow Burners, we've crafted a set of basic guidelines for for social media, including:
 
·       Scope of Social Media
·       Personal vs. Professional
·       Who Are You Speaking For?
·       Who Are You Speaking To?
·       Basic Personal Conduct
·       Employees: Using Social Media at Work
·       What To Say? What Not to Say?
 
Scope of Social Media
Social media includes websites and services that facilitate interaction and conversation between people online. This includes social networking sites (Facebook, Tribe, LinkedIn, etc.), content on media sharing sites (Flickr, YouTube, etc.), blogs, microblogs (Twitter, etc.), web comment sections, forums, wikis, and social areas of a website.
 
Personal vs. Professional
You're generally encouraged to be mindful of and responsible for how what you say will reflect not only on you as an individual, but Burning Man as an organization and a culture. Because of the hazy line between the professional and the personal when it comes to being a part of this organization, even "unofficial representatives" online can reflect on us all and hamper our ability to fulfill our mission.
 
If you use a pseudonym, you should assume that some people know who you really are. Be transparent about your connection to the organization where appropriate.
 
Who Are You Speaking For?
If you're saying something from your own perspective or stating your personal opinion rather than speaking officially for Burning Man, it's never a bad idea to specifically state that. Typically, you should not consider yourself a "spokesperson" for Burning Man, and sometimes (such as moments of crisis)? Definitely leave it to the spokespeople.
 
Who Are You Speaking To?
It's best to assume Burning Man's worst critics, biggest fans, your supervisor, your coworkers, and your mother all likely have the ability to access what you write online, even if you're not directly "connected". Never underestimate the velocity with which information jumps across networks.
 
Basic Personal Conduct
Your actions online should reflect Burning Man's values as presented in the Ten Principles, our Mission Statement, and all written policies for email list and alias usage. Walk the talk with how you behave, as well as what you say.
 
Employees: Using Social Media at Work
It's between you and your manager to determine when / how much use of social media is appropriate during work hours, and/or when you should engage with social media in pursuit of your responsibilities.
 
What To Say? What Not to Say?
We trust you to exercise common sense and good judgment in your communications. If ever you're not sure about something, check with your manager or Communications.  Here are some thoughts:
 
-       Don't Know? Don't Answer. If somebody's asking a question, and you're not sure of the answer, there's nothing wrong with saying, "I don't know," -- but there's a lot wrong with perpetuating speculation or rumormongering. Refer questions to somebody who knows the answer if you don't.
 
-       Confidential Information. Never disseminate proprietary or confidential Burning Man information (things like unannounced policy changes, legal issues, and ongoing litigation). If you're not sure it's confidential, err on the side of caution, and check with your manager or Communications.
 
-       Know Your Facts. While you might *think* you know something, there could be something in play you're not aware of, or a recent internal change. Ask around if you're not absolutely sure.
 
-       Tell the Story. Feel free to provide unique, individual perspectives on non-confidential activities or anything that's publicly observable or not proprietary to your role. Telling stories is how Burning Man's values are shared in the world.
 
-       Personal Privacy. It's common courtesy, before mentioning co-workers or other individuals involved with the Project, to check in with them to assure they're okay with being mentioned by name in association with Burning Man.
 
-       Don't Feed the Trolls. Avoid engaging trolls (people who bait you with inflammatory statements to get a reaction), or participating in a flame war. Even if you "win" you lose. Burning Man is a widely misunderstood discussion topic, and negative PR and misstatements abound, but sometimes the best response is just to let them die out on their own.
 
-       Don't Be *&$%# Offensive. If you use offensive or inflammatory language, you'll be perceived as offensive or inflammatory, and the rest of Burning Man will be too.
 
Once posted, social web content can stay in play and affect perceptions for a very long time. Think before you hit "Send".  Any questions, concerns or ideas can be addressed to Burning Man's Communications Team.
 
Acceptable Use of Burning Man Regional Email Lists
 
The purpose of this policy is to provide guidelines about acceptable use of Regional Burningman.org email distribution lists for sending and receiving email messages and attachments, or any Technology Department resources thereof. The policy describes the standards that users are expected to observe when using Burning Man Regional Announcement and Discussion lists for email, and ensures that users are aware of the consequences attached to inappropriate use of these resources.
 
Further, this policy serves to advise the users of those guidelines to provide a framework wherein users of these lists can apply self-regulation to their use of these resources.
 
1. Email groups are established for Burning Man Regional Contacts to utilize to organize local Burning Man communities and enable Burners to maintain a cultural connection to one another online. All email to a group should be consistent with the purpose of the group, and used to accomplish tasks related to and consistent with the values of the Regional Network and the Burning Man Project at large.
 
2. Burning Man's Technology Team, Regionals Team, or Regional Contacts/list managers may restrict access to these lists where there is reason to believe that laws or Burning Man policies have been violated. Unacceptable use of email lists includes:
• Use of email to support any inappropriate commercial advertising or for-profit activity unrelated to the Burning Man Project or the Regional Network.
• Use of email to initiate or forward chain letters. (NOTE: Most chain emails referring to viruses are hoaxes, and should be ignored/deleted.)
• Failure to use “OT” to designate off-topic posts, or abusing the option of occasional “OT” posts.
• Violations of copyright laws (unlawful distribution of copyrighted printed material, audio recordings, video recordings, or computer software.)
• Sending messages to an individual or group that are unwelcome. This includes continuing to send such messages after being asked by the individual or group member to cease doing so, even though the material itself may not be considered offensive.
• Use of email to lodge grievances that should be handled through existing Burning Man policies and procedures, such as the Conflict Resolution protocols.
• Use of a false email address or “spoofing”.
• Use of email to threaten or harass others, to cause annoyance, disruption, or needless anxiety.
• Spamming – sending unsolicited material and/or material not related to Burning Man’s mission to the lists, or using the list to cull for addresses with which to do so.
• Use of email to promote political or religious causes or events. (Note: Given Burning Man’s commitment to public service, the use of email lists to send information about governmental, civic, or charitable organizations or community-wide events such as memorial services may be an approved use.)
• Use of mass email to publicly castigate, chastise, defame, or ridicule any person, particularly any member of the Burning Man community.
•  The willful introduction of computer viruses or other disruptive/destructive programs into the Burning Man network or other networks.
• Disruption of activity related to the Burning Man mission or the mission of the user’s specific team.
• Disclosure of personal information or violating the privacy of other users. This includes publishing to others the text of a message written on a one-to-one basis, without the prior express consent of the author.
• Use of email lists to obtain individual email addresses with which to execute any of the above-outlined violations in an “off-list” manner, or to create separate lists for secondary or outside purposes.
 
3. List moderators and owners will monitor the use of these lists to ensure that the above-listed guidelines are met.
 
4. Managers will also act to restate the purpose and mission of each list on a regular basis to ensure that all members maintain an understanding of said purposes. Moderators will be responsible for assuring that new members are advised of those missions and of these stated policies, and monitoring the list for adherence to the above-outlined regulations and policies.
 
Misuse of Burningman.org Resources
Suspected or known violations of this policy, or of the law, should be confidentially reported to the Regional Committee at Burning Man, who will collaborate and/or work with the local moderator to execute appropriate action or response.
 
Violations may result in revocation of email service privileges; management or staff disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from Regional Contact role; referral to law enforcement agencies; or other legal action. 
 
Acceptable Use of Burning Man Aliases and Email Addresses
Last update: December 2014
 
This Burning Man alias (yourname@burningman.org) and email address policy exists to provide guidelines for acceptable use for the purpose of sending or receiving email messages and attachments via a Burningman.org email address or alias. The policy is also designed to specify the actions that Burning Man will take in the investigation of complaints received from both internal and external sources about any unacceptable use of email that involves Burning Man’s technological resources.
 
1. Unacceptable use of said resources may include:
a)   Use of email to support any commercial advertising or for-profit activity.
b)   Use of email to initiate or forward chain letters. (NOTE: Most chain emails referring to viruses are hoaxes, and should be forwarded to list-request@burningman.org for review. If the content of the email is determined to be real and should be distributed to the Burning Man community, the Technology Department will take appropriate action.)
c)    Violations of copyright laws (unlawful distribution of copyrighted printed material, audio recordings, video recordings, or computer software.)
d)   Sending messages to an individual or group that are unwelcome. This includes continuing to send such messages after being asked by the individual or group member to cease doing so, even though the material itself may not be considered offensive. (Note: A user may not “unsubscribe” from lists used by Burning Man for official purposes, unless the user is separating from duties and affiliation with that group.)
e)   Use of email to lodge grievances that should be handled through existing Burning Man policies and procedures, such as the Conflict Resolution protocols.
f)     Use of a false email address or “spoofing”.
g)   Use of email to threaten or harass others, to cause annoyance, disruption, or needless anxiety.
h)   Spamming – sending unsolicited material and/or material not related to Burning Man’s mission to the lists, or using the list to cull for addresses with which to do so.
i)     Use of email to promote political or religious causes or events. (Note: Given Burning Man’s commitment to public service, the use of email lists to send information about governmental, civic, or charitable organizations or community-wide events such as memorial services may be an approved use.)
j)     Use of mass email to publicly castigate, chastise, defame, or ridicule any person, particularly any member of the Burning Man community.
k)   The willful introduction of computer viruses or other disruptive/destructive programs into the Burning Man network or other networks.
l)     Disruption of activity related to the Burning Man mission or the mission of the user’s specific team.
m)Disclosure of personal information or violating the privacy of other users. This includes publishing to others the text of a message written on a one-to-one basis, without the prior express consent of the author.
n)   Use of aliases to obtain individual email addresses with which to execute any of the above-outlined violations in an “off-list” manner.
o)  Burningman.org email addresses and aliases are given for the purposes of representation of the organization for official purposes. They are not intended as “perks” and are limited in distribution to those whose roles require them to represent the organization accordingly. As such, users should bear in mind that when composing email from said addresses, one’s words can and are perceived as representing the organization, even, at times, when one claims to be expressing one’s personal opinion. Email users should take care to not give the impression that they are representing, giving opinions, or otherwise making statements on behalf of Burning Man or any team thereof unless they are expressly asked to do so. At times, statements such as the following disclaimer may be appropriate: “The opinions or statements expressed herein are my own and should not be taken as a position, opinion, or endorsement of the Burning Man Project.” 
 
2. Email resources may be used for incidental personal purposes provided that such use does not:
 
p)   Directly or indirectly interfere with the operation of computing facilities or email services.
q)   Interfere with the email user’s employment or other obligations to the Burning Man Project.
r)    Violate this policy or any other applicable policy or law, including but not limited to use for personal gain, conflict of interest, harassment, defamation, copyright violation, or illegal activity.
s)   Email messages arising from such personal use shall, however, be subject to access consistent with this policy and applicable law. Accordingly, such use does not carry with it a reasonable expectation of privacy.
 
3.  If a user has been requested by another user via email or in writing to refrain from sending email messages, the recipient is prohibited from sending that user any further messages, until such time as he/she has been notified by the appropriate manager that such correspondence is permissible. Failure to honor such a request shall be deemed a violation of this policy.
 
4.  If, due to latency, departure, or dismissal, a change in the user’s status with Burning Man occurs, email or alias privileges may be revoked at the sole discretion of Burning Man. This includes when the affiliation between the user and Burning Man comes to an end, by any circumstances.
  
Misuse of Burningman.org Resources
Suspected or known violations of this policy, or of the law, should be confidentially reported to the appropriate supervisory level for the team in which the violation occurs. Violations will be processed by the appropriate managers, and/or law enforcement agencies as necessary.
 
Violations may result in revocation of email service privileges; management or staff disciplinary action up to and including dismissal; referral to law enforcement agencies; or other legal action.
 
Alias Format
In order to promote consistency, professionalism and eliminate confusion, all new email addresses and aliases going forward in 2014 and beyond will follow this format: first.last@burningman.org
 
This policy doesn't apply to those who've already been assigned first name or playa-name aliases. Those already existing first name/playa-name email addresses are grandfathered and won’t have to be changed except in cases where, in the transition of email addresses from burningman.com to burningman.org, a duplicate exists. Then an evaluation and change to a first.last@burningman.org email address may occur.
 
Exceptions going forward may be made on a case-by-case basis for year-round staff with outward-facing customer service positions in addition to their internal roles. Examples of this could be those in the Communications Department, HR department, playa staff, or anyone else who has community-facing responsibilities.  Any questions can be directed to your department head, who will make the final call on allowing first name or playa name aliases. 
 
Best Practices in the Use of Burning Man Email Lists
Last Update: December 2014
 
1 DO NOT send attachments to a Burning Man list. Attachments should be put on the Ultranet, and linked to from there.
2 Use the letters "OT" to indicate something is "Off Topic", meaning it's personal, or about a non-Burning Man-related subject.
3 Headers should reflect the subject of your email. In the midst of a long debate, check to make sure your header still reflects the subject you're talking about.
4 Avoid cross-posting to multiple lists. When people begin to "reply to all" posters from other lists will bounce, forcing the moderator to open every attempted post to ensure it's not actually from someone on the list who might be posting from another email address. One suggestion would be to post separately to each list, but indicate you've cc:ed the other lists at the top of the body of the email.
5 If you hit "reply" to an email, you will be replying to only to the original sender, and not the list. You will need to hit "Reply to All" if you wish to reply to the poster AND the list. When you hit "Reply to All", it's also good form to remove the email address of the original sender so they don't get two replies.
6 Do not EVER take a private email sent to you and put it on a public discussion list without permission of the original sender. This is basic internet etiquette.
7 Remember ALL CAPS means you're yelling, and we don't need to do that to family and friends on a Burning Man discussion list.
8 Don't be mean to each other ... take it off list. No one wants to see others arguing in public.
9 It's very easy to dissect a person's email point by point, and in some cases this is the best approach. Sometimes summarizing your thoughts at the top can be speedy for you and for the reader.
10 Rather than including all large number of email addresses in the CC: field of a message, use the BCC: function if you must send an email to any group over 20 people that don’t know each other.
 
Acceptable Use of Burning Man Email Lists

The purpose of this policy is to provide guidelines about acceptable use of Burningman.org email distribution lists for sending and receiving email messages and attachments, or any Technology Department resources thereof. The policy describes the standards that users are expected to observe when using these resources for email, and ensures that users are aware of the consequences attached to inappropriate use of these resources.
 
Further, this policy serves to advise the users of those guidelines to provide a framework wherein users of these lists can apply self-regulation to their use of these resources.
 
1 Email groups are established for Burning Man committees, departments, and special projects. Email to a group should be consistent with the purpose of the group, and used to accomplish tasks related to and consistent with the Burning Man mission.
2 Burning Man’s Technology Department may restrict or suspend access to these lists where there is reason to believe that laws or Burning Man policies have been violated. Unacceptable use of email lists includes:
i Use of email to support any commercial advertising or for-profit activity.
ii Use of email to initiate or forward chain letters. (NOTE: Most chain emails referring to viruses are hoaxes, and should be forwarded to list-request@burningman.org for review. If the content of the email is determined to be real and should be distributed to the Burning Man community, the Technology Department will take appropriate action.)
iii Failure to use "OT" to designate off-topic posts, or abusing the option of occasional "OT" posts after being given feedback by list manager.
iv Violations of copyright laws (unlawful distribution of copyrighted printed material, audio recordings, video recordings, or computer software.)
v Sending messages to an individual or group that are unwelcome. This includes continuing to send such messages after being asked by the individual or group member to cease doing so, even though the material itself may not be considered offensive. (Note: A user may not “unsubscribe” from lists used by Burning Man for official purposes, unless the user is separating from duties and affiliation with that group.)
vi Use of email to lodge grievances that should be handled through existing Burning  Man policies and procedures, such as the Conflict Resolution protocols.
vii Use of a false email address or “spoofing”.
viii Use of email to threaten or harass others, to cause annoyance, disruption, or needless anxiety.
ix Spamming – sending unsolicited material and/or material not related to Burning Man’s mission to the lists, or using the list to cull for addresses with which to do so.
x Use of email to promote political or religious causes or events. (Note: Given Burning Man’s commitment to public service, the use of email lists to send information about governmental, civic, or charitable organizations or community-wide events such as memorial services may be an approved use.)
xi Use of mass email to publicly castigate, chastise, defame, or ridicule any person, particularly any member of the Burning Man community. 
xii The willful introduction of computer viruses or other disruptive/destructive programs into the Burning Man network or other networks. 
xiii Disruption of activity related to the Burning Man mission or the mission of the user’s specific team.
xiv Disclosure of personal information or violating the privacy of other users. This includes publishing to others the text of a message written on a one-to-one basis, without the prior express consent of the author.
xv Use of email lists to obtain individual email addresses with which to execute any of the above-outlined violations in an “off-list” manner.
 
     3.  List moderators and owners will monitor the use of these lists to ensure that the above-listed guidelines are met. They will also serve to re-examine list membership each year. Membership to each list is restricted to active members of that team, except as membership may be defined by an emeritus or consultant status; therefore, lists will be culled each year to ensure that membership is limited to those who have an active role in the missions of the team or of Burning Man. 
     
     4.  Moderators will also act to restate the purpose and mission of each list on a regular basis to ensure that all members maintain an understanding of said purposes. Moderators will be responsible for assuring that new members are advised of those missions and of these stated policies, and monitoring the list for adherence to the above-outlined regulations and policies. 
 
Misuse of Burningman.org resources
Suspected or known violations of this policy, or of the law, should be confidentially reported to the appropriate supervisory level for the team in which the violation occurs. Violations will be processed by the appropriate managers, and/or law enforcement agencies as necessary.
 
Violations may result in revocation of email service privileges; management or staff disciplinary action up to and including dismissal; referral to law enforcement agencies; or other legal action.
 

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If you liked this you might like to learn more about how effective industrial press conferences are at major trades shows.
 
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Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
 
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New Inbound Marketing Services Offered

Tue, Mar 28, 2017 @ 03:13 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook

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inbound-marketing-cincinnati.pngDo you need help with your inbound marketing initiatives? We have just launched a new marketing services selection that will work with you and your team to help you develop and execute your projects and programs.

Here are a few product services to build and repurpose content:

Dynamic White Paper
Let us turn your existing white paper into a 10-minute audio/visual experience. Our editor will create a narrated visual presentation from your white paper, and then we will promote it to your target audience for 12 months.
 
White Paper Writing Service
Let us write, design, and host a technical paper for your target audience. Consult with our editorial director and then let our technical writer work with you to create the white paper. We can host and promote your new content or you can promote to your already existing customer base and prospects.
 
Build a Tech Talk
Our editor will consult with you, construct a presentation, prepare slides, and craft a script for your company's expert, who will provide the voiceover. Our moderator will introduce your expert and close the presentation.
 
Audience Engagement Quiz
Our editor will consult with you and then write an audience quiz based on your white paper or e-book. We design and then deploy the quiz to your target audience. You receive full contact leads as well as statistics on how each registrant did on the quiz and who downloaded your white paper or e-book.
 
Let us help you to define content strategy and to distribute your new and existing material to build your brand.

To schedule a free consultation to discuss your next project, contact Chuck Lohre at chuck@lohre.com or call 513-961-1174

 
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If you liked this you might like to learn more about how effective industrial press conferences are at major trades shows.
 
###
Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
 
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The Industrial Marketing Trade Show Dance at CONEXPO 2017

Sun, Mar 05, 2017 @ 02:10 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Trade Show Displays, Trade Show, Trade Show Displays, Industrial Marketing Trade Show, Trade Show Banner Stand, Trade Exhibit Modular Displays, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Advertising, Trade Show Exhibits, Trade Booths, Trade Exhibits

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Everyone in the industrial market knows that the CONEXPO-CONAGG 2017 show is opening Tuesday March 7. The conference will be in Las Vegas from March 7-11 and is expecting over 125,000 attendees and 2,400 exhibitors. In terms of a conference, that is huge and provides quite the opportunity for any business. 

Radio_Conexpo_v5.jpgThe CONEXPO got its start here in Ohio in 1909, debuting as a ‘Road Show.’ The early exhibitors prided themselves on displaying ‘amazing new devices’ that could do the work of 15 horses. It continued to grow and did so at an unprecedented rate during the construction boom after World War II. In the 1970’s it opened its doors to the international community, as well as, the CON/AGG show, which also had began in the early 1900’s; by combining shows and creating CONEXPO-CON/AGG, both attendees and exhibitors alike we able to experience all the emerging products, equipment, and services in one place, maximizing time, money, and educational opportunities of the construction and industrial industries.

With so many people and exhibitions attending this show, most industrial companies recognize the importance of marketing their product or service. They know that this is an opportunity to reach other businesses, consumers, and influential individuals in the industry, which is why having a solid team, effective communication, and a game plan are so important for a trade show of this caliber.

Preparing for a Trade Show

This is the first step required for a good trade show exhibit. Everyone must be on the same page about what is required from him or her and how to, not just execute it, but to do so properly. This requires effective communication, clear guidelines, and stringent implementation.

Preparation for the show includes everything from how your booth will look to with whom you staff it; both should be of high quality.

Too many times have I been to a trade show that individuals are on their phones, talking to each other, or eating food when they should be grabbing the attention of the people passing by. This typically happens because stringent rules weren’t put into place to prevent such things from happening. Allowing such behavior to occur will only hurt the company and the reputations of those involved; possibly affecting your credibility and professionalism. Be sure to have educated employees and sales staff on hand who are dedicated to success and to achieving the purpose of the trade show: to gather leads and to make connections.

This is where effective communication comes into play. Let staffers know that they are there for a purpose and that purpose is to generate leads, not to eat McDonald’s in the back of the booth around noon. The typical trade booth staff will walk away from training with a good pitch to throw at people passing by, but an excellent staff will walk away knowing an immense amount of knowledge on the product as well as having a clear objective to what they are responsible for doing. Some booths include people who just catch the attention and move interested individuals to sales reps who know more about the product and while the assembly line is beneficial and provides an organized mechanism for all booth employees, reminding employees that everyone has the same objective helps keep everyone on track and can help prevent a lack of involvement from employees. Some companies sometimes implement contests, hoping to motivate employees and sales reps alike to drive in business.

Creating an Inviting Trade Show Booth

You want to make sure your booth looks welcoming, interesting, and clean. You don’t want something that is too ‘homey,’ people won’t take you seriously, but you also don’t want a both that results in looking so technological or industrial that a layperson can’t understand it and are too intimidated to stop by or don’t find it interesting. Having a well-balanced booth and a friendly staff of people who can clearly and concisely explain what you have to offer is the best route to go here. trade show

Providing information, good information, is crucial to the success of your booth. Pamphlets are great and are very popular at trade shows, but how many of those make it to the plane ride home? Not many, most natives to the city hosting the  trade show will tell you that most of them end up littering the streets once all visitors have left. This is where educated employees matter, reinforcing the point above. According to Skyline Exhibits 5 common Pitfalls to Trade Show Marketing blog, offering to take someone’s email address or telephone number on the spot and stating that they probably have enough to carry without you adding to their load can be a very effective means of gathering individuals’ information. Using technology, like a tablet for instance, in this situation can maximize your outreach. People may not have one of your pamphlets to throw away at the airport, but they will be able to check the email you sent or listen to the voicemail you left on the plane ride home; already making for a more personal experience and your booth, and more importantly your product, will stick out in their mind.

Effective Marketing of Your Trade Show Attendance

Standing out at a trade show is important and learning how can be difficult. According to Susan Friedmann, the Trade Show Coach there is more than one way to do this. One of the best strategies is having your company/client try and align new product announcements and trade shows together. Having a new product to premier at a  trade show is a good way to get some press prior to the show. We have had a couple of clients take this route for the CON/AGG conference and we have been shooting out press releases and public relations left and right. Most publications, whether print or electronic, are willing to take such information and publish it. They too recognize the enormity of the show and know that many people are reading publications to ‘be ahead of the game’ and to know what to expect from the trade show exhibits. Also be aware that most publications need this information well in advance, so having your own deadlines to accomplish the media announcements is necessary.

trade showUtilize social media. Make it known on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, etc. that you will be there and that you have something new rolling out. This also will build an interest with your followers who aren’t going to the show itself and could even prompt them to come along too.

Schedule a press conference if possible. Many media outlets, local and international, will be covering the convention; such large conventions can get a lot of coverage time via the media and having a press conference about your new product or your attendance can really increase your popularity at the show; not to mention the publicity involved with media coverage.

Learning the trade show dance can be difficult, especially when the convention/show itself has been around for over one hundred years; that makes for an evolution of dance. But, surrounding yourself with a positive, well-motivated team who is willing to work hard, combined with effective marketing and a welcoming booth should create a successful experience.

See you there!

If you liked this post, you will also enjoy Trade Show Display Exhibit Booth Marketing Trends

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Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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How to Write a Public Relations Telemarketing Script

Mon, Feb 13, 2017 @ 04:51 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing Communications, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Consumer Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, Public-Relations-Telemarketing-Script

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Telemarketing for public relations is more than a list and a telephone.

To do it efficiently, you need clearly defined scripts for every possibility: calling, email, voice mail and snail mail.

Telemarketing is defined by the number of actions you need to take to get the job done. The number of computer screens you look at and the number of clicks you need to make. Just like any other industrial process, when you look at the full spectrum of events and actions needed to engage the customer and take action, small changes and improvements in your process can have the effect of cutting your time in half and doubling your results. It's all about clearly writing a process script.

Contact Science Telemarketing Marketing Communications resized 600

Image from Contact Science from klpz, we're a partner so get in touch if you're interested in doing telemarketing in half the time and getting four times the results.

In this blog post, we'll illustrate the process by writing a public relations telemarketing script. New product information is one of the centerpieces of industrial marketing. It's where equipment manufacturers get to tell the technical journal readers about the latest equipment. Many publications compete to publish the latest in energy and mechanical efficiencies.

The first stage in our contact process is identifing the prospects in our target industry and sometimes geographic region. We'll call the companies and get the name for the persons involved in marketing communications.

Second we will prepare a mailing of a published article along with a testimonial letter from the client. Here's the memo copy.

Hi Greg,

Do you need an innovative partner to help inspire your marketing department? That's what happened at Stedman Machine Company. Sure, it's easy to say, "Go do content marketing," but someone has to do it. And who better than a 20 year veteran. 

Public-Relations-Telemarketing-Script.jpg

 

The second major push with this campaign is to review the editorial schedule for the prospect's industry. When you can tell them on the phone that you have an article placed for them, you will get the work.

Hi Greg,

I hope you enjoyed the sample and letter last week from Chris Nawalaniec with Stedman Machine Compny. Kevin Cronin with POWDER BULK SOLIDS Magazine would like to publish your article on the selection of size reduction equipment.

Technical Article, Graphic Design, and Illustration for Stedman Machine

The final call to the prospect needs to clarify the scope of the work and the timeline.

Hi Greg,

Thanks for the conference call last week. I had watched one of the videos you mentioned and I've found the other two as well as the summary video. We can write a thought leader article on this subject by the deadline. Here's the proposed schedule.

Public-Relations-Telemarketing-Script-1 copy.jpg

This campaign is designed to keep us in touch with our clients and prospects throughout the year and every year. They all read the trade journals and sepecially the articles they wrote. We never take credit for the articles. 

If you liked this blog post, you might enjoy, "How to Write a Telemarketing Script for Trade Shows." 

 

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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Plan for an Industrial Content Driven Marketing campaign

Fri, Jan 20, 2017 @ 04:54 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Graphic Design Agency, Advertising Agency, Industrial Content Driven Marketing

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Consumer media is getting very fractured, but industrial content driven marketing is still led by a few quality publishing houses. 

Sure you can spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on full page ads every month in your industrial trade publications. But you wouldn't be taking advantage of the invitation to supply educational and application articles to the publication as well. Industrial marketing is a partnership between you and the industrial publishing houses. And that includes trade shows as well. The best publishing companies also have the best shows.

 Industrial-Content-Marketing.jpg

 

But don't start your Industrial Content Driven Marketing by dropping your advertising programs. Sure industrial engineers use the Internet to find products and services but most times they aren't looking for cheap high volumes. LinkedIn Groups can't reach the audience a good industrial trade journal can. They have been at it for generations and even though many of them are getting slim they are getting better at serving up great content online. It is sort of like asking a 60 year old to start dating again but they are. Google wants to serve up the best results for their searchers and the vetted trade journals are the best. You can't find manufacturing engineering as a company description on Facebook. They keep asking us to change our client's descriptions to "Local Service."

So trim your advertising budget down to three placements a year in the top two or three publications and also make a commitment to provide two or three articles. They will cost you several thousand dollars each but they will be the gift that keeps on giving. If they rank well on the internet you can also promote them with Google, Bing or LinkedIn Adwords or Sponsored Content. Better yet tie your advertising to your content.

Industrial-Content-Driven-Marketing.jpg

The featured image in this blog post is the advertisement that promotes the technical article above. The article also goes on the client's website. Ads today are like landing pages on the internet. They are to promote a piece of content. How Hubspot would like you to get folks to exchange their email address for that content but that is much harder to achieve. Still, you can track how many visitors come to your site from the ads and content. And then adjust your media buy next year. 

And that sums up what's happening in the industrial marketing world. Publications are trying to migrate over to being completely digital not because they want to but because their readers are dying off. The editorial teams will continue to rule the content world, now we just have to find a way to pay them.

 

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Economical, Custom, Modular Motors and Drives

Fri, Jan 13, 2017 @ 01:40 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Graphic Design, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertising Literature, Graphic Design Agency, Cincinnati Design, Design Agency, Advertising Agency

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ABM motors and drives are tailor-made specifically for the application whether it requires compact design, low-noise operation or maximum operating safety.

A flexible modular design system allows cost-effective low volume production runs. Custom motors and drives are available for a wide range of application types: forklifts, electric vehicles, lifting technology, biomass heating systems, textile machines, wind power control, warehouse logistics, high-speed doors, air compressors, construction equipment, packaging machinery and vehicle-inspection equipment. The high overall efficiency of ABM Drive helical and parallel shaft gearboxes reduces power input and energy consumption.

ABM-Drives-Economical-Custom-Motors-and-Drives-1.jpg

All products are engineered in-house. Components that represent a core competence are reliably produced in-house on state-of-the-art machine systems. This guarantees that electric motors, gearboxes, brakes and electronics are perfectly coordinated. Vertical integration of ABM Drive manufacturing includes tool-and-die engineering and aluminum die-casting to guarantee best implementation and integration of components to a compact drive unit. High-quality gearing guarantees quiet operation. Tight-fitting housing covers and flanges prevent distortions that can amplify noise. Aluminum housings absorb harmonics and other vibrations better than cast iron. 

A large center distance between the motor centerline and the hollow drive shaft centerline gives the application designer more freedom/clearance to integrate the unit into the application. Many layouts are possible, from integration of the motor into the gearbox housing, U mounting of the motor, to customizing the output shaft. The end result is a true plug-and-play motor and drive-unit solution designed to save time and money.

ABM DRIVE INC. engineers and manufacturers high-performance motor, gearbox, brake and frequency inverter solutions for machines, plants and mobile devices in hoisting technology, warehousing, material handling, electric vehicles, biomass heating systems, wind turbines and many other markets. Founded in 1927, the company belongs to the senata Group with an annual turnover of nearly 400 million € and more than 2,000 employees. Approximately 300,000 drive units are produced annually. In-house manufacturing includes tool-and-die design, aluminum-casting foundry, CNC housing machining, manufacturer of shafts, cutting of gear teeth, motor development technology, assembly and final testing.

PRESS CONTACT
ABM DRIVE INC.
Gabriel Venzin, President
394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 110, Loveland, OH 45140
Phone: 513 576 1300
Mobile: 513 332 7256
Website: www.abm-drives.com
E-mail: gabriel.venzin@abm-drives.com

AGENCY

Lohre & Assoc., Inc., Marketing Communications

Chuck Lohre, President
126A West 14th Street, 2nd Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202-7535
Phone: 877-608-1736, 513-961-1174, Fax 513-961-1192
Mobile: 513-260-9025
Email: chuck@lohre.com

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