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Start Your Marketing Plan with the End Goal in Mind

Mon, Mar 30, 2020 @ 02:27 PM / by Scott Hasson posted in Process Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, machine tool marketing

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Start Your Marketing Plan with the End Goal in Mind

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By defining these campaign goals, you will better formulate the message, timeline, budget and results. You will have all of the info ready for your agency to successfully execute your objectives. With your objectives in mind, you can measure the necessary metrics to know if your efforts are working.

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How OEMs Can Make Marketing Meaningful

Tue, Mar 19, 2019 @ 11:06 AM / by Sarah Loeffler posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Sarah Loeffler, OEM Magazine

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Tired of spending high dollars on all sorts of marketing activities only to be inundated afterward with a bunch of contacts that aren’t right for your business for one reason or another?


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your industrial marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Military Vets Hardwired for Manufacturing Success

Thu, Jan 17, 2019 @ 01:57 PM / by John Hitch posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, John Hitch

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soldier-suit-handshakeGetty Images

Military Vets Hardwired for Manufacturing Success

Finding quality manufacturing workers isn't easy, though one machine reseller has found checking the veteran status on job applications to be a good strategy.

Curt Doherty, CEO of CNC Machines, has about a dozen full-time employees to receive, prepare and resell the machining equipment cutting, shaping, and forming America's way back to manufacturing prominence. He started out in the early 2000s snapping up auctioned units from liquidating machine shops when so many manufacturing jobs moved to China. Now orders are coming back and that has kept the company he started in 2014 very busy. Moving inventory isn’t the problem anymore; finding suitable workers is.

The Florida-based reseller has 60,000 manufacturers in its database and Doherty says none are immune from the skills gap created when all those trade jobs went away and the talent pool was not refreshed.

"I don’t think I've run across anybody who said, 'We got too many people to hire here,'" he says. Their problem is just finding people who are skilled. They can find button-pushers, but they can’t find problem-solvers."

Interviews with prospects just out of school sometimes last less than minutes, Doherty says, as that's how little time it takes for them to sink their chances by prematurely veering the conversation to "What are you going to do for me?"

"I have a much harder time hiring from colleges because there is way more entitlement," Doherty says. "They just have higher expectations."

The Millennials and younger he has hired are working out great, but "I had to weed through a lot more to find those," Doherty says.

In his experience, Doherty has found one surefire way to get employees with the right set of skills to succeed in a demanding, highly versatile workplace: Check their military veteran status.

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"Here' the thing with veterans, Doherty says. "As long as you give them a clear mission and what their job title is, make sure they have the right training and support, they tend to be very self-sufficient."

Veterans, he observes, also have an embedded sense of selflessness.

"They don’t just do it for commission," Doherty says. "[The work is] bigger than themselves. That comes hardwired from the military."

They are also hardwired for adaptability, which is vital in the machining world. Switching from Mazak to Fadal machines can be like learning a new language, Doherty says. What a worker has learned on affects what machines job shops invest in over capabilities and effectiveness. Due to their discipline and years of following instructions, learning new technology doesn’t become an impediment.

"It doesn’t matter what you throw in front of them; they are going to figure it out," Doherty says.

A few of the specific, manufacturing-friendly skills Doherty says vets possess:

  • Ability to quickly learn new skills and concept
  • Attention to detail
  • Leadership
  • Teamwork
  • Grace under pressure
  • Respect for procedures
  • Being attuned to global and technological trends
  • Adherence to health and safety standards

All of these are inherent in CNC Machines' head of service, David Wilkes, Doherty says.

"He's my Swiss Army knife and oversees everything," Doherty explains of the former Pfc. Wilkes, who operated a Vulcan cannon in the Army during the 1990s. Wilkes now runs the machine logistics, checks them in, manages their cleaning and repair, and performs final checks and customer demos.

CNC Machines
Army vet David Wilkes, CNC Machines' head of service, has excelled with an increase in responsibilities, CEO Curt Doherty says.

"As a machinist I got to use a lot of the skills I learned in the military, such as my attention to detail, my organizational skills and even leadership skills, Wilkes says.

Wilkes, who quickly climbed the ranks at CNC Machines, came to the job from a repetitive job at a firearms manufacturers where Doherty says he didn’t have a lot of leeway to approach the work, though he has "flourished" now that he can apply the problem-solving skills he learned in the military.

There was only one big issue the CEO has had with this particular veteran.

"He was coming in early and not clocking in because he didn’t want to take advantage of the company and get overtime," recalls Doherty, adding he also took short lunches to get back to work. "And I said, 'I appreciate it but legally I need to pay you the overtime.'"

The company also had a former Marine on the sales team who had to deal with an extremely difficult customer, but his experience helped him always keep professional demeanor. When asked if he was OK after the call, Doherty says the vet replied, "Curt, I've been shot at. I'll be fine."

Like any high-performing asset in your plant, veterans require some additional monitoring because of their experiences. One combat veteran that Doherty hired who "had a ton of potential" was had to cut his time short due to PTSD concerns.This is something for medical professionals to diagnose but you can learn more here.

The U.S.  Department of Veterans Affairs says 11-20% of veterans who served in Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF) live with PTSD in any given year. It's also treatable and like any issue in a machine shop or factory, can be managed with the right preparation.

Doherty says due to the overwhelming positive experiences with veterans, his company is offering three $1,000 scholarships for veterans applicable for a certificate, associates' or bachelor's degree in manufacturing. The winning vets just have to submit the most compelling essay and their DD214. Click HERE to apply. Deadlines are Feb. 5, March 5 and April 5, 2019.

And if you need further convincing, check out this video from the Manufacturing Institute:

 

 


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your industrial marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Industrial Marketing Sales Tips that Still Matter

Mon, Jan 07, 2019 @ 02:43 PM / by Jim Lucy posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Jim Lucy

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An ace salesperson can sometimes sell you some good life lessons.

We all have to do some selling in our lives, even if we don’t have to meet monthly sales budgets. In many business situations, we sometimes have to “sell” our own credibility and competence. In new social situations, we may have to sell our potential as an enjoyable companion.

Industrial Marketing Management

When I was quite young I actually did make a few sales. I won a YMCA gym bag for selling a carton of thin mints in a fundraiser, and for selling two subscriptions to New Jersey’s Ridgewood News, I got a 75-cent bleacher ticket to see the New York Yankees play.

These days, I leave the hard sales to the fine sales force we have selling print and digital ads for EW so the editorial staff and I can focus on creating the content for this magazine, like this month’s package of articles on the changes in electrical sales. But some classic sales tips I learned over the years still apply in today’s ever-more digital world. Below are several of them.

Remember the little things. I was always amazed how Tom Preston, one of the industry’s true legends, always remembered the names of someone’s wife, husband, their children, as well as their hobbies, etc. I discovered the method to his magic when he once asked to fetch a card from his Rolodex file. I was amazed to see how many notes he had scrawled on the cards of various contacts — birthdays, family names, you name it. This was the pre-computer age, but to this day it’s the best contact database I have ever seen.

Internet-marketing

Keep replenishing your industry contacts. Retirements, layoffs and job changes constantly chip away at our circle of contacts. There’s no better way to rebuild them than to make the most of the networking opportunities at industry events. We have all been at a trade show or conference where we are dog-tired and just want to get back to the hotel room and put our feet up. Don’t give in. I can’t tell you how many times I made a new contact because I made the extra effort to stop by a few more booths at a trade show or circulated around the room at a cocktail party just a little longer. And when I do, I always thank Tom Preston, who always worked a reception by walking the room clockwise and counter-clockwise, just in case he missed someone.

A positive attitude goes a long way. I never met someone in this industry who enjoyed his sales career as much as Bob Finley, who after retiring as Glasco Electric’s president, wrote for EW for more than 20 years on what it takes to sell electrical products. If you ever met Bob, you could feel his positive energy the moment he walked into a room. “I am so glad that I had the privilege of spending my entire career in sales,” Finley wrote in one of his EW articles. “I can’t think of anything I would have rather been. Being a salesperson fit me like a glove on my hand.”

Never forget WIFM. The late Jim Newton used to joke that he knew it was time to retire from his family business, Oakes Electric Supply in Holyoke, MA, and try something else, when he got to work one day and found his desk moved out into the parking lot. That something else turned out to be Sales Tech, a training company that taught a generation of electrical salespeople about the importance of “WIFM”—“What’s in it for me?” Newton used to say everyone has their own WIFM and that the trick was to figure out how to service that need. In one of the many articles he wrote for EW, he said, “Whether the guy is the purchasing agent, treasurer or chief electrical engineer, he still wants to do better.

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You have to figure out how to present what your company is offering in ways that makes them think, ‘This would be good for me.’”

Go the extra mile. A shoeshine guy at Grand Central Terminal once told me he got a job just because he helped an office receptionist set up a Christmas tree. “I was a delivery guy, and I used to be friendly with this receptionist in an office building,” he said. “If I had time between deliveries I would help her with some of her stuff, moving boxes, opening mail, whatever. One time I was helping her put up some Christmas decorations in the lobby, and the boss came in. He said, ‘You don’t even work here, but you are helping my company. That’s the kind of employee I want.’ He hired me on the spot for a nice job.”

These tips from some of the best salespeople I ever met always work for me and I hope they help you, too.

Jim Lucy | Dec 19, 2018, ELECTRICAL WHOLESALING blog post 12-19-18


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your industrial marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Seven Ways to Ruin your B-to-B Advertising

Thu, Dec 13, 2018 @ 01:27 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Powder Bulk Engineering Magazine, Business Marketing Magazine

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From POWDER BULK ENGINEERING'S 12-13-18 Dry News, from the February 1992 issue of Business Marketing

Business-Develpoment

And, we do understand that these really don’t apply to you, as you’re at 
least a 6x advertiser in Powder Bulk Engineering magazine, or you wouldn’t get Dry News each month!


1. Confuse the readers with an obtuse headline. In 7-10 seconds a reader
can scan the headline and illustration to see if your product offers anything
of value. Make sure it does not.


2. Run your ad only once – twice at the most. After all, if on average, it
takes 6-8 personal sales calls to clinch the deal, why not ignore this fact.


3. Focus on your favorite topic – you, your business and how great it is. You’re certain
that’s what your prospects want to know.


4. Don’t distinguish your products from anyone else’s. Even though you know that
most of your prospects won’t change suppliers unless given a powerful reason, don’t
give them those reasons in your ads.


5. Pretend that the market already knows as much about your products as you do.
 Ignore that old saying, “the more you tell, the more you sell.”


6. Presume that your prospects think exactly like you think. Don’t spend any money on
research to learn what the market currently really thinks.


7. Ignore professional advertising advice. Isn’t it your opinion that counts? Why listen
to someone outside your company who may have a different perspective? Or who will
do research for you, for a fee, of course.


If you’ve followed all of these seven steps, and somehow are successful in spite of yourself,
 there’s one more thing you can try: Withdraw all of your advertising completely!



Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your industrial marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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IEEE GlobalSpec and TREW Marketing 2019 Smart Marketing for Engineers Survey

Wed, Nov 28, 2018 @ 09:33 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, TREW, IEEE GlobalSpec

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Top 10 Findings

Industrial marketing trends for 2019


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your industrial marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Why Cat changed its machine branding, "Aggregates Manager" Magazine Article Review

Fri, Nov 02, 2018 @ 11:00 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing

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Cat’s new “Modern Hex” trade dress design will give machines a new look.

Industrial-Marketing-Branding-1


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your construction equipment marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Industrial Blogging – An Underutilized Content Marketing Tactic

Tue, Oct 30, 2018 @ 08:21 PM / by Achinta Mitra posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Achinta Mitra

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Industrial blogging is usually not a favorite subject of discussion with my manufacturing and engineering clients.

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Learn more by visiting Industrial Marketing Today where this editorial was originally published.

(Thanks for the great summary of industrial marketing Achinta you and I couldn't agree more.)


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your processing equipment marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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What is Search Engine Optimization? (SEO)

Thu, Aug 02, 2018 @ 01:27 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Business to Consumer Marketing, Website Design, Internet Design and Development, Cincinnati Web Design Agency, Internet Development, Cincinnati Website Design, web development, Ad words

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Great infographic on SEO from IEEE Globalspec Engineering 360

Screen Shot 2018-08-02 at 1.19.36 PM.

 
If you liked this post you might like this one, "Great website design is an ongoing process."
 
Guide to Web Site Redesign by Cincinnati Website Design Company, Lohre & Associates
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Our Brain and Our Business: How They’re Related

Tue, Jun 12, 2018 @ 01:46 PM / by Mellissa Lutz posted in Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Advertising

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From the SMPS Foundation: "Have you ever seen a sign that says, “Please do not touch the art,” and you touched it anyway? This motivational reaction to rules that takes away specific behavioral freedoms is called “reactance.” This occurs when someone is heavily pressured to accept a certain view, attitude, or behavior and can increase resistance to persuasion. If you push someone towards not touching the art, they will want to push back.

Kicking off the latest SMPS latest research project.
Article written by SMPS Foundation President Melissa Lutz, FSMPS, CPSM.
The SMPS Foundation.
Here’s another example: Would you buy a yogurt that’s advertised as 80 percent fat free or would you buy the one that’s 20 percent fat? This concept is a part of “framing.” Taking identical information and presenting it in different ways to change people’s preferences is just one of the concepts of neuropsychology that the foundation explored at our recent research workshop.

Last month, the SMPS Foundation held its first-ever research workshop to kick off our latest project: Understanding the Neuroscience (Neuropsychology) in Client Decision-Making. JonRobert Tartaglione, founder and CEO of Influence 51, led the discussion. He’ll continue working with us to develop a more robust and scientifically informed understanding of client decision-making behavior and its application to marketing and business development.

I came away from this session completely fascinated with my brain after our exploration of the Five Principles of Influence, which is outlined below. Coming into this session, each of the participants introduced themselves and shared how they hoped the knowledge would help them. My hopes were that the concepts learned from each principal of influence would help me in three areas:

  1. To better communicate in my personal life with my family and friends and to be a better wife, mother, sister, daughter, and friend
  2. To enable me to better assist Champlin by exploring new ways to help serve our clients, help our team to win more work, and ultimately work together better
  3. To help SMPS by being a better leader and to better communicate and frame some of the initiatives on which we’re ready to embark

Our research will dive into the Five Principals of Influence, their associated key concepts, and how they can be utilized when communicating as well as delivering services to clients internally and externally. The Five Principles of Influence include:

Principle 1: The human brain is not a computer
Principle 2: Our social nature matters
Principle 3: Our political sensibilities matter
Principle 4: Timing and priming matter
Principle 5: Structure of presentation matters

If you’re attending Build Business in San Diego, you’ll learn more about our research project, which will be presented at a high-level during one of the sessions. If you’re unable to attend Build Business, the SMPS Foundation will continue to update members on the project’s progress and when the report will become available.

Of course, your support of the foundation is greatly appreciated and needed to continue this work. Please consider making a donation today.

SMPS Foundation President Melissa Lutz, FSMPS, CPSM, is principal at Champlin Architecture. She can be reached at melissa.lutz@thinkchamplin.com or 513.241.4474, x116.


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Sales Lead Generation Guide by Cincinnati Marketing Agency Lohre & Associates

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