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Great Test-Pectations - Mining Equipment Marketing

Fri, Aug 05, 2016 @ 02:37 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Advertising, Content Creation, Content Marketing

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(This week's post is a recent article we wrote for POWDER BULK SOLIDS on a major factor in mining equipment marketing - trying before you buy! Thanks to Stedman Machine Company for the opportunity to work with them to create one of the finest marketing programs I've been a part of in my nearly 40 years in the business. Lohre also took the photos.)

Learn why it’s smart to try before you buy size reduction equipment.

By Chris Nawalaniec, Vice President of Sales & Marketing, Stedman Machine Company

Why Test?

Selecting the right equipment is also a great way to save energy. Sure you could use a carpenter’s hammer to drive a railroad spike, but it is not very efficient, and while a sledgehammer is more common, an automatic spike driver can make the task nearly effortless. However if you are only driving a single spike, the additional energy required using the automatic option becomes cost prohibitive. A review of your material and process by the equipment manufacturer can help you avoid the pitfalls of under or over selection.

Mining-Equipment-Marketing-8-5-16.3.jpg(Stedman Machine Company photo of closed size reduction circuit system with the Stedman Grand Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactor and a round vibratory screener.)

Testing helps determine the most efficient processing technology to meet production needs. The right equipment saves time and money in the long run. Full-scale testing provides precise size reduction solutions for the exact material/s and demonstration of a specific model before purchase.

While the nuances of size reduction are infinite, commonly encountered industrial size reduction applications use equipment that achieves reduction through one or more of the following:

  • Impact -- hitting a friable material to break large parts into smaller ones
  • Shear -- tearing or ripping material
  • Compression -- squeezing and pressing down on a material until it breaks.

Design parameters that drive size reduction crusher selection include production requirements, material characteristics, project location, climate conditions, capital cost, safety and environment, the life of product/expansion plans and maintenance requirements.

Some types of machinery can last decades. Buying the wrong equipment can have long-term consequences in the cost of consumables, lack of production and downtime. Yearly consumables alone could exceed half the cost of the unit. Size- reduction equipment is typically integrated into a large system. By choosing the wrong equipment, it could inadvertently create a bottleneck that affects the productivity of the overall system.

Test facilities have hundreds of reports on file that may match your application. Saving the expenses of preliminary testing or in the selection of the proper size reduction method. Frequently the staff has experience crushing your material or a similar material. New applications are compared to existing reference data for similar applications. Past tests provide valuable insight into how to configure equipment and plan tests.

Picking the right test facility

Simple devices like the mortar and pestle and technologically complex machines like giant mining crushers perform the same basic task: making big things smaller. Finding the right equipment for this critical process step should begin with the question, “Do we need size reduction equipment, knowledge, or both?”

Choose a test facility that has a range of different size reduction methods. A full complement of hoppers, mechanical conveyors and screens enable test plant technicians to replicate both open and closed systems. Full-size crushing equipment is best for dependable results. It is difficult to scale up crushing results from a lab-size crusher. Lab machine tests may not determine the actual horsepower and machine size the project requires. 

Is the test plant set up to provide real-world conditions in which customers can view their materials being processed -- from feeding, through size reduction and discharge/separation? Does it have an open slot to allow for the installation of other machines on an as-needed basis? Are there cameras to provide live video feeds of materials as they are being processed?

Once the testing is done, toll processing, in the same facility, can produce enough product to test downstream processes, such as briquetting and extrusion, in the future facility to ensure that the process will perform as expected. Remember, the goal is to find an application solution rather than simply buying equipment.

Mining-Equipment-Marketing-8-5-16.1.jpg(Stedman Machine Company photo of open size reduction circuit system with the Stedman Grand Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactor and a round vibratory screener.)

What the test plant needs to know

Size reduction process design begins with an understanding of the feed’s physical and chemical characteristics and ends with the product’s physical specifications and other unique product considerations. Five things are needed to evaluate testing possibilities:

  • Feed size
  • Moisture content
  • Tons-per-hour capacity required
  • Final product size
  • Safety data sheets

A material with high moisture content may become gummy and build up on the inside of the crusher. Moisture has a cushioning effect and can cause the material to stick together reducing productivity. When material buildup is a concern, the addition of equipment heaters and air cannons can be used to reduce build up allowing for more efficient operation. Brittle materials are easily crushed, but the process may create too many fines. Heat-sensitive materials may need cooling systems. 

Getting the material to the test facility may be a problem. Can the consistency of the material change during shipping to the test plant? Can the facility restore your material to its as-shipped condition? For typical tests about 200 to 500 pounds of material are required.

What to expect during the test

First steps are sampling of the raw feed to establish the input gradation, moisture level and creating a plan for crushing tests specific to the project goals. To achieve the desired particle size and consistency, the test facility will consider: particle size distribution (the percentage of lumps versus fines) as it enters the crusher, feed control (Will it become gummy or sticky?) and how material is taken away from the crusher. If the material has a large percentage of fines, it’s more efficient to separate the fines with a screener first. Only the oversized material goes through the crusher.

Plan to spend a few days observing the testing process and all the procedures necessary to produce the required end product including preparation, loading of your material and RPM sets for fine to coarse production. You’ll witness the real-time horsepower consumption through start up and full load.

Test plants are operated in either open or closed circuit. Open circuit means the material passes through the crusher once. Closed circuit means that material is re-circulated back into the crusher if it doesn’t pass through a certain screen mesh. In closed circuits, as much as 30 percent of material may re-circulate before meeting size requirements, which increases energy use by 30 percent.

If needed, the test facility will run your material through various crushing methods and/or determine how to fine tune the crusher’s configuration for your process. Two different type crushers may effectively reduce your material at the specifications you need, but one may require much less horsepower and less cost to operate.

Mining Equipment Toll Processing(Stedman Machine Company photo provided of closed, air-swept size reduction circuit system with a Stedman Vertical Roller Mill.)

The report

The data produced from the test of your material helps estimate operating costs from power consumption to wear parts and the information needed to select the right crushing and size reduction equipment. The written technical report provided to you will include the following:

  • Raw feed particle size distribution
  • Moisture content analysis
  • Product particle size distribution gradation analysis
  • Bulk density analysis before and after crushing
  • Abrasion Test to determine if an impactor is feasible for a particular application and to estimate hammer wear life.
  • Power requirements for startup and operation

Evaluating results and scale up

Performance data obtained on test plant equipment are scalable to accurately predict outcomes achieved on production models. Once your tests are done, the sales engineer will make recommendations for equipment type and size, open or closed circuits and other equipment like air cannons or heaters to loosen caking or sticky material. The equipment selected should produce the same particle size distribution as the test unit and the energy required at the production throughput rate is scalable from the test equipment.

Size reduction expressed in the simplest form is: “Material + Energy = Size Reduction.” Experienced, knowledgeable size reduction equipment suppliers will guide a customer through the correct questions and recommend the best-suited method for any specific materials. Reputable suppliers will refer customers to other equipment manufacturers with better-suited styles of equipment when their products are not suited to the application.

In conclusion, following these simple steps when and where you define your product and process, perform testing and consider your installation, you will succeed in buying a crusher that will provide years of trouble-free processing.

Stedman Machine Company, 129 Franklin Street, Aurora, IN 4001, 812-926-0038; www.stedman-machine.com, sales@stedman-machine.com 

About the author

Chris Nawalaniec is Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Stedman Machine Company, the Aurora, Ind.-based manufacturer of size reduction equipment and systems, founded in 1834. Nawalaniec graduated from the University of Cincinnati (BSME, MBA) and has more than 30 years professional experience in size reduction and particle size separation. Nawalaniec oversees new machinery and system sales, as well as the full-service test plant that has been operating at Stedman for more than 90 years. (Read Chris' mining equipment marketing testimonial.)

About Stedman Machine Company

Stedman Machine Company works closely with its customers to determine the best, most cost-effective, efficient size reduction method and equipment for specific applications. Stedman’s line of equipment includes: Cage Mills, Grand Slam™ and Mega Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactors, V-Slam™ Vertical Shaft Impactors, Hammer Mills, Aurora Lump Breakers, Micro-Max™ and Vertical Roller Mill Air Swept Fine Grinders. Stedman operates a complete testing and toll processing facility staffed by experienced technicians with full-scale equipment, allowing customers to witness accurate crushing test results, predicted output capacities and processing data. Support services include system design and 24-hour parts and service


Cincinnati's Full-service Industrial Advertising Agency

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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Food Engineering Magazine Field Report Preparation Guide

Tue, Jun 21, 2016 @ 03:46 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Technical Editing, Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Technical Writing, Process Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Content Creation

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Content Creation: Food Engineering Technical ArticleHere are some pointers for preparing a Food Engineering Field Report—also known as an application story, success story or an application brief for our Dry Processing Technology section.

A Dry Processing Technology Field Report describes a problem and its solution. It may involve any product used in the food processing industry; for example, feeders, screening equipment, size reduction equipment, mixing/blending, bulk bag filling & discharging, mechanical conveying, pneumatic conveying, dust control, weighing systems, storage systems, micro and macro ingredient handling systems, thermal processing equipment (ovens, dryers) packaging equipment, metal detection/magnetic separation, process control system hardware and software, and so on. If you’re not sure whether your product, application or service applies, please call and we’ll brainstorm it. See sample Dry Processing Technology Field Reports attached.

Absolute requirements for publication

A submittal must contain the following or it will not be used.

  • Body copy of 500 to 700 words
  • At least two end user (food processor) quotes: perhaps one describing the problem and one suggesting that he/she is pleased with the solution, which should be quantifiable. That is, for example, it saved xx amount of time, reduced energy costs by xx percent, or the process improvements increased OEE by xx percent.
  • If you are unable to get end user (food processor) quotes, we may still have interest in the application story. We use this version online and in our bi-monthly eNewsletter. Think of these stories coming from a well know cereal manufacture or leading snack producer perspective. We require the same information, without the processor quotes or references.
  • Name of user company and name and title of person being quoted at the user Company

Quotes from supplier companies will not be used, and will be turned into straight text when appropriate.

  • Photograph of product, service, software at the food processor’s site—not a straight

product shot! Photograph must be print quality; that is high resolution jpg at 300 pixels per inch (ppi). Recommended physical size is at least 5x7 inches. Do not send Web quality. Don’t forget a suggested caption and photo credit. You may send more than one photo. Do not save screen dumps as jpg files! Use a non-destructive format (tif). Call for instructions!

  • Real name of a person, phone number and email at the supplier for more information

(sales contact)—no web addresses or sales@email.com addresses! 

  • Your contact info: Name, phone, email, address.

Please advise as to where this story may have already been published. If it has been used on a

competing publication’s website or in a printed magazine, we won’t be able to use it. If it’s been

published on a supplier’s website, we can use it as long as it’s not more than a year old. Obviously, if exclusive rights to use the story have already been given to someone else, please don’t send it to us. Please make sure of this first. Also, be sure you have cleared the story with the processor.

Please note: These stories are used on a FIFO basis (first in, first out). Publishing dates cannot be guaranteed, but complete submissions, of course, will be published before incomplete submissions.

Contact Debra Schug for more information: Debra Schug, Features Editor, Food Engineering,

schugd@bnpmedia.com, 847-405-4068.

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Win With Technical Articles

Tue, May 03, 2016 @ 12:33 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in industrial photography, Process Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Content Creation, illustration, technical illustration, Content Marketing

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Dear Powder Bulk Solids Show "Win with Technical Articles" winners,

  • Will Dartnall and Mark Gruber, Buckhorn
  • Jim Kinder, Carrier
  • Greg Boyer, Hosokawa
  • Steven Misiak, B&P Littleford Day
  • Wes Vinson, PEBCO
  • Mike Mullins, TEMA
  • Jasilyn Fuller, VEGA
  • Rob Driscoll, Robatel
  • Maria Petsola-Crawley and Dean Wicks, Macawber
  • Courtney Ridenour, ADF Engineering
  • Greg Thomas and Paul Hancock, Lewellyn

Thanks for visiting our website and claiming your prize. We hope you'll enjoy the game. Just go to Major League Baseball's site and let me know what game you would like to attend. Chuck Lohre, chuck@lohre.com, cell 513-260-9025.

### Beginning of the most successful Technical Article we have written. The phones started ringing as soon as it was published. We hear a lot about content marketing and social media (and we believe in it), but in the industrial marketing world we have always been about content marketing. 

And content doesn't get any better than a feature article in a major trade publication like this one that ran in April 2016 Pit & Quarry magazine. To succeed, you must be honest and educate readers even if you don't manufacturer every sort of variation of a particular process solution. Editor, Darren Constantino, uses our articles as examples of what it takes to get published in his magazine. Don't worry, they are calling you, not your competition.

Vertical Shaft Impactor (VSI) Primer

By Eric Marcotte, Inside Sales Manager, Stedman Machine Company 

Technical Article, Graphic Design, and Illustration for Stedman Machine

Introduction

All roads, you might say, lead to the Vertical Shaft Impactor (VSI) because these crushers make it possible to create roadways and just about everything else. Francis E. Agnew of California patented one of the first Vertical Shaft Impactors in 1927. His configuration stacked three VSIs atop each other to produce sand, thus starting the VSI evolution. 

Today, VSI crushers – and the folks who rely on them – have produced many configurations to include everything from the addition of cascading material into the crushing chamber, to air swept separation of lighter product. One version suspends the shaft from above like a sugar centrifuge. It’s also one of the most feature-patented crushers, so some of the things mentioned here might be unique to a single manufacturer. VSIs apply a large amount of energy to crush material and that’s why it’s one of the most versatile crusher configurations today.

VSI Benefits

When it comes to producing materials such as aggregate for road making, VSI crushers use a high-speed rotor and anvils for impact crushing rather than compression force for the energy needed for size reduction. In a VSI, material is accelerated by centrifugal force by a rotor against the outer anvil ring, it then fractures and breaks along natural faults throughout the rock or minerals. The product is generally of a consistent cubical shape, making it excellent for modern Superpave highway asphalt applications. The rotor speed (feet per minute) controls final particle size.

The VSI’s high cubical fracture percentage maximizes first-pass product yield and produces tighter particle size distribution. It has a high-throughput capacity ideal for beneficiation (elimination of soft material). Properly configured the VSI accepts highly abrasive materials. It has simple operation and maintenance. You can quickly change product size by changing rotor speed or cascade ratio. Some models have reversible wear parts to reduce downtime. The VSI typically has low operating costs even in high-moisture applications because of reduced energy costs and low wear cost per ton.

VSI Disadvantages

There are some feed size limitations with a VSI because of the small feed area available in the center of the rotor. Tramp material in the feed such as gloves, tools, etc. can cause problems with imbalance. The high RPM and HP require careful balance maintenance such as replacing shoes on both sides of the rotor at the same time. High wear part cost may be a problem for some hard abrasive materials, but the VSI may still be the best option.

Technical Article for Marketing Client Stedman MachineVSI Applications

Major limestone applications are for Superpave asphalt aggregates, road base, gravel, sand and cement. Industrial uses include: corundum, corundite, ferro silicon, glass, refractories, silicon carbide, tungsten carbide and zeolite. Mining applications include: bauxite, burnt magnesite, iron ore, non-ferrous metal ore, perlite and trona sulfate. VSIs are excellent for everything from abrasive materials to waste and recycling applications.

VSI Crushing Method

The VSI is typically used after a primary or secondary crusher. This makes a VSI ideal for making sand and for making coarse and medium aggregates for concrete/asphalt production.

Feed size and characteristics will affect the application of a VSI. The feed size is limited by the opening in the center of the rotor. Normally less than 5-inch material is desired, but very large VSIs can handle up to 12-inch feed. Another feature that will affect application is moisture, which can make the feed sticky. Required production capacity is the final limiting criteria. Large primary horizontal shaft impactors can output up to 1600 TPH and more. 1000 TPH is about the maximum for a VSI because of the limiting motor size and the rising G-force of a high-speed rotor, which is calculated by multiplying the radius times the square of the RPM.

Shoe configurations are many: rock on rock, groups of rollers, special tip wear parts and many others. The metallurgy of the shoes is also highly varied. Rotors can have three to six shoes. The number of shoes is typically governed by the diameter of the rotor. The larger the diameter rotor, the more openings are possible. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mathematical models are utilized to simulate the flow and collision forces to reveal solutions for lower wear cost, consistent final product, and higher energy efficiency.

The material to be crushed is fed into the center of an open or closed rotor. The rotor rotates at high rpm, accelerating the feed and throwing it with high energy into the crushing chamber. When the material hits the anvil ring assembly, it shatters, and then the cubical shaped product falls through the opening between the rotor and the anvil and down to the conveyor below.

The rotor speed (feet per minute) controls final particle size. Speeding up the rotor will produce more fines, slowing it down will produce fewer fines.

Feeding methods

Center feed

The typical VSI is fed, from above, into the center of its rotor. The material is then flung across an open void to the crushing chamber.It then impacts the outer anvil ring. This crushing action imparts very high energy to the material and is very effective on most types of material. It gives a very uniform and consistent grade of product.

Cascade feeding

In cascade feeding, material bypasses the rotor and enters the crushing chamber from above. It’s called cascade feeding because as material fills up a large feed bowl, with an outer diameter larger than the outer diameter of the rotor, it spills over the side and falls into the crushing chamber from above, bypassing the rotor. The effect of increasing feed through cascade is similar to slowing the rotor. Cascade feeding in amounts up to 10 percent may have no effect on particle size distribution or quality. The product gradation curve and product shape will change, if an increased amount of cascade feeding is used.

(caption: Vertical Shaft Impactor, No Cascade vs. With Cascade Feed, Particle Size Distribution Chart)

Technical Article for Marketing Client Stedman Machine CoRotor and Anvil Configurations

The VSI features multiple rotor/anvil configurations for various applications. From open or enclosed rotors to the tubular rotor, each machine is configured for their unique application. In many cases the rotor table, rotor assemblies, anvil ring or rock shelf are interchangeable, allowing maximum application flexibility.

• Open top metal rotor shoe on metal anvil

The open top metal rotor is good for large feed or medium to very hard material, but it will work best for softer materials. It can handle medium abrasive, dry or wet, but not sticky materials. High reduction ratios are common, which are excellent for sand and gravel production in closed loop systems. Shoe shape can change the production size range. A straight shoe face design produces finer product, and a curved shoe face design produces coarser material.

• Tubular metal rotor shoe on metal anvil

The tubular rotor creates higher tip-speeds, which increases first pass yield with tighter particle size distribution and also reduces the recirculation loads. One unique feature is that the rotor rotation is reversible, allowing wear on both sides of the tube. Rotating the tube itself one-quarter turn also doubles the wear.

• Enclosed metal rotor shoe on metal anvil

The enclosed top plate on a rotor primarily prevents material from escaping from the top of the rotor, which could happen with an overfed open top rotor. (caption: Rock shelf when VSI at rest. In operation, the brown rock fills the chamber to the upper roof ring. Rock impacts rock in operation.)

Technical Article for Industrial Marketing Client, Stedman Machine• Enclosed autogenous rock rotor table on autogenous rock shelf

Any time the material or rock is used as an impact wear surface the term autogenous is used. Putting a top on the rotor table and shoes allows autogenous use. During operation of the VSI, a bed of material can be designed to build up inside the rotor against each of the shoe wall segments. The bed, which is made up of material that has been fed to the rotor, extends to a wear tip. The bed protects the shoe wall segment from wear.

Concerning the rock shelf anvil, it forms a near vertical wall of material upon which the accelerated material impacts. “Rock-on-rock” crushing reduces maintenance but can require up to 30 percent of material recirculation before meeting size requirements. Also, the rock shelf anvil absorbs energy that could otherwise be used for breaking, which may reduce efficiency. More RPM may be needed to achieve the same result as a solid metal anvil.

Good for medium abrasive materials, rock-on-rock configurations of either or both rotor and anvil may produce consistent material with low-wear cost and can handle wet but not sticky conditions. Reduction ratios from 2:1 to 5:1 can be expected. It’s widely used for quarried materials, such as sand and gravel.

_________________________________________________

Due to the many configurations of the VSI feed, rotor, anvil and open- or closed- system design; testing is the only way to ensure proper application of a VSI crusher.

_________________________________________________

Summary

The VSI is one of the most versatile crushers available on the market today. Even with some limitations, like feed size and output capacity, VSI features have been and continue to be developed to maximize first-pass yields and lower operating costs. If you test your process on full-scale equipment before choosing your VSI, you won’t be disappointed.

Stedman Machine Company, 129 Franklin Street, Aurora, IN 4001, 812-926-0038, www.stedman-machine.com, sales@stedman-machine.com

### End of technical article, thanks for looking it over. Now let's, "Play Ball."

About the author: Eric Marcotte joined Stedman Machine Company and its affiliate Innovative Processing Solutions in 2010. He has a Mining Engineering Degree from the University of Kentucky. 

About Stedman Machine Company

Stedman Machine Company works closely with its customers to determine the best, most cost-effective, efficient size reduction method and equipment for specific applications. Stedman’s line of equipment includes: Cage Mills, Grand Slam™ and Mega Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactors, V-Slam™ Vertical Shaft Impactors, Hammer Mills, Aurora Lump Breakers, Micro-Max™ and Vertical Roller Mill Air Swept Fine Grinders. Stedman operates a complete testing and toll processing facility staffed by experienced technicians with full-scale equipment, allowing customers to witness accurate crushing test results, predicted output capacities and processing data. Support services include system design and 24-hour parts and service.

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What is Size Reduction?

Tue, Apr 19, 2016 @ 12:53 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, B2B Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Content Creation

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"Adding energy to a material to make large pieces smaller" 

Energy + Material = Size Reduction

Different types of size reduction equipment are available and each has its own method of reduction. The right machine for the task is the one that can add energy most efficiently for the application.

From the beginning of time, humans have found it necessary to make little pieces out of big ones – stone, ore, ice, grain and more. It was a slow, laborious process for many centuries. Then in the Stone Age came the first breakthrough – we call it a hammer – and it worked better than ever. It worked so well, in fact, that it's still one of the most widely used tools in the world.

Today, there are many different size reduction machines available to make little pieces out of big ones. Particle size-reduction equipment includes primary impact crushers and secondary crushers as well as milling machines - cage mills, hammer mills, pulverizers and grinders.

Materials processed fall into broad categories including abrasive, non-abrasive, wet or dry, sticky and friable. Experience evaluating these factors helps target the correct equipment for each unique project.

Impact Crusher Equipment Marketing Graphic Design / 3d IllustrationWhat is an Impact Crusher?

Impact size reduction incorporates striking to pulverize material. The primary types of impact crushers include -- horizontal shaft impactors (HSI), cage mill pulverizers, and vertical shaft impactors (VSI). Each impactor can be further designated as primary and secondary rotor crusher as well as tertiary and quaternary crushers. This particular designation is dependent on which processing stage the equipment is being utilized.

Crushers are engineered for a maximum feed size, target output size, and total capacity, but selecting a crusher on these criteria alone is merely half the task. Every size reduction project requires evaluation of the complete process to maximize production and keep operating costs low.

Crusher Throughput Production
Feed enters the crushing chamber and meets the breaker bars or plates propelling feed against the breaker plates resulting in impact reduction. There are no screens or grates holding material inside impact crushers, so material is efficiently processed at high rates for low costs.

Impact crusher applications

Aggregate

Coal, Energy & Biomass

Minerals & Mining

Brick, Clay & Ceramics

Industrial Applications

and many more…

 

Cage Mill Equipment Marketing Graphic Design / 3d IllustrationWhat is a Cage Mill?

A cage mill is an internally fed impactor that crushes grinds or pulverizes many different materials to specified degrees of fineness.

Early cage mill crushers were used principally to crush materials that were not particularly abrasive – corn, salt, coal, clay. After its invention, numerous applications were discovered and soon cage mills were used for crushing chemicals, clay and fertilizer materials. It wasn’t until the 1930s that the true value of cage mills as an agricultural limestone crusher, a size reduction mill and beneficiation was realized. Cage mills can be configured in two, four, and six row designs, each with their own unique crushing applications.

What Industries Use Them?

Limestone

Calcium Carbonate

Coal

Corn

Potash

Hydrated Lime

Clay & Shale

Seashells/Oyster Shells

Salt

Slag

Fertilizer

Detergent

Gypsum

Activated Carbon

Distilled Dry Grains (DDG and DDGS)

Sandstone

Tungsten Carbide

Aluminum Dross/Slag

Brick - Commercial & Residential

Pavers & Roof Tile

 

Hammer Mill Equipment Marketing Graphic Design / 3d IllustrationWhat is a Hammer Mill?

A hammer mill is a crusher that can grind, pulverize, and crush a wide range of materials. This crusher employs a rain of hammer blows to shatter and disintegrate the material. Hammer mills produce a finish product size that is dependent upon: Openings in perforated screens or grate bars, Number, size and type of hammers, Grinding plate setting and Rotor speed.

Standard service can be performed with common hand tools. Machines can be rebuilt over and over, saving you money. Wood hammer mills, also called wood hogs are special heavy-duty hammer mills specifically designed to process wood and fibrous waste without the use of high maintenance knives. Machines have simple designs with rugged construction that make them easy to operate and maintain.

Hammer Mill Applications

Animal Tankage

Coal

Limestone

Biomass & Biofuels

Bagasse

Wood

Corn Stalks

Barley Shorts

Bran

Cocoa Shells

Feed

Grains

Crab, Clam & Oyster Shells

Fish Meal

Gelatin

Gypsum

Meat Scraps

Oats

Salt Cake

Corn

Soy Bean Expeller Cake

Steamed Bone

Hops

Wheat
 

Fine Grinder Equipment Marketing Graphic Design / 3d IllustrationWhat is a Fine Grinder?

The number and kind of grinders are as diverse as the materials they are designed to reduce. The earliest examples are as simple a mortar and pestle and have evolved to include the horse mill, windmill and watermill.

Today, fine grind products include modern air swept material handling and classification methods to efficiently produce consistent finely ground powder products.

Fine Grinding Applications

A wide variety of industries rely on fine grinders including…

Agricultural Processing

Chemical Processing

Feed Processing

Food Processing

Mineral Processing

Pharmaceutical

Rendering

Soap & Detergent

 

What is a Lump Breaker? 

Lump-breaking equipment is able to reduce lumps created in the production, storage or transportation of bulk solids and powders - without generating excessive dust and fines. The rotation of specially shaped blades through a fixed comb gives an efficient lump breaking action.

Lump Crushing Applications

Soda Ash

Coal

Sodium Bicarbonate

Pet Coke

Fertilizer

Salt

Herbicide

Gypsum

Filter Cake

Detergent

Sugar

Frozen Vegetables

 

Chain Mill Equipment Marketing Graphic Design / 3d IllustrationWhat is a Chain Mill? 

Chain mills represent a cost-effective crushing solution for reducing a wide variety of materials. The simple design features a chain curtain at the impact end to allow for a swinging action requiring little maintenance.

Chain mill crushers can handle a large volume of tailings per hour. An especially effective fertilizer crusher, our chain mill crusher series is engineered to break up lumps in superphosphate, triple-superphosphate, granular and conventional fertilizer tailings.

Chain Mill Applications

Fertilizer

Animal Bedding

Sawdust

And more...

(This article was written for our client Stedman Machine Company for POWDER BULK ENGINEEERING's eNews. Lohre & Associates did the illustrations as well.)

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Most Common Problems & Answers is important in Mining Equipment Marketing

Sat, Nov 07, 2015 @ 09:52 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Internet Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, Content Creation

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Q: What are some typical problems with size reduction equipment, and how can they be addressed?

(This is an article Lohre & Associates worked on with Stedman Machine Company to create a foundation of top of the funnel educational information for new engineers and persons to the mining equipment industry. Every good mining equipment marketer knows that if you take the time to educate a person new to the industry, they will remember you when they are looking for solutions to their problems.)

A: Chris Nawalaniec, Stedman Machine Company, says:

The following are some typical size reduction equipment problems and some advice to address these issues.

Problem: Wear part costs are too high.

  • Turn the faces of your wear parts or exchange these issues with those from other areas of the equipment that don't wear as much.
  • Run crushing tests with your material on various equipment types. Testing also yields important information about the size reduction process such as particle size distribution before and after crushing, moisture content (which changes during crushing, affecting the material's handling characteristics), power consumption, and estimated wear cost (in terms of how frequently metal parts must be replaced). The test will also determine how well the equipment handles your material's other characteristics, such as friability, abrasiveness, plasticity, and heat sensitivity.
  • Look for unusual wear patterns on parts to detect feed or discharge problems that can be addressed.

Problem: Energy costs are too high.

  • Properly feed the crusher. The feed may not be evenly distributed across the crusher face, or it may not be at the proper choke amount. The feed may not be entering the crusher at the proper angle as it shouldn't initially hit the rotor directly.
  • Try using one machine that can do the entire size reduction job, which will save money and improve your process. Cage mill crushers can achieve up to 40-to-1 size reduction ratios.

Problem: Labor costs are too high.

  • You may be spending too much time unclogging the machine. Moisture can cause material buildup, which can clog the crusher and require long hours of maintenance to clear the crusher. Air cannons can release material clogging impact aprons and impact anvils. If your feed entry chute is clogging because of sticky material, heaters can be used to cause material to slide off the feed entry chute.

Problem: Production levels are too low.

  • You may consider installing a screener prior to the crusher to remove on-size particles from the raw material. This reduces wear on the crusher and minimizes the number of times the material is handled, resulting in a higher profit per ton of material.
  • Impactors can offer a higher production rate without the need for screens if you can afford to have some oversize product.

SMC_GSillus_Lg_All-300x300.jpg

Problem: Equipment is high-maintenance.

  • Hammermills may require more maintenance than you prefer. Substituting an impactor is a lower-maintenance choice.
  • Also, a cage mill may be able to reduce your two-stage process to a single-stage size reduction process.

Problem: Equipment isn't used enough.

  • Consider toll processing. Most size reduction equipment suppliers also offer toll crushing services for a fee, which can be valuable in the right circumstances. For instance, you may need toll crushing to help develop a new product or improve or develop a process before investing in new equipment. You may also require toll crushing to meet an intermittent need (such as once per quarter) for crushed material or to obtain crushed material if your company has limited capital for purchasing size reduction equipment.

Problem: Equipment is too dangerous.

  • Explosive materials (very fine airborne dust particles) are often the cause for safety concerns. Introducing water after crushing can offer a solution. In extreme cases with extremely explosive material, water may need to be introduced before crushing but that will increase wear.

Problem: Equipment service is poor.

    • A well-maintained crusher will last 20 to 30 years, and your supplier should provide assistance throughout its lifetime. You should have documentation to refer to on startup, commissioning, and training and keep recommended spare parts in stock.
    • Make sure your equipment supplier offers the continuing service you need. Around-the-clock service can be invaluable for emergencies and to address safety concerns.

Problem: Equipment costs are too high.

    • Consider how the crusher affects the process's total energy requirement. For instance, can the crusher you're using yield product with a narrower size range that requires less downstream processing?
  • Cost per ton factors into your product's value. Gold slag obviously requires reclamation but wear part costs can be a 100 times more than for a limestone application.

Selecting the proper size reduction method is part science and part experience, and troubleshooting equipment and process problems can be just as difficult. Maintaining your relationship with the supplier over the long-term will also help you stay abreast of new size reduction technology. This will help your operators and maintenance workers evaluate whether updating your equipment or process can improve your product quality, increase the production rate, or reduce your operating costs.

Read the original article at PBE-News.


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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Ten reasons industrial marketing departments don't write?

Tue, Oct 20, 2015 @ 10:58 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Content Creation

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Industrial_marketing_banner_ad
  1. Don't want an educated customer.
  2. Don't want to leverage purchase of trade journal advertising.
  3. Don't have the personel that understand the product application
  4. Afraid the customer might find a better solution.
  5. Don't want students to come work for the company.
  6. Would rather see the industry decline than lobby legislators.
  7. Don't want to admit that the product just got improved.
  8. No need to stay in touch with customers.
  9. Afraid conference visitors might stop by the booth.
  10. No leadership.

The following article got ten times the response from the display ad purchase. And it will continue working 24/7 to attract visitors to their site. What's preventing you from getting your money's worth?

Industrial_Marketing_Technical_Writing

More Questions and Answers, POWDER BULK ENGINEERING E-Newsletter Oct 2015

Q: What are some typical problems with size reduction equipment, and how can they be addressed?

A: Chris Nawalaniec, Stedman Machine Company, says: The following are some typical size reduction equipment problems and some advice to address these issues.

Problem: Wear part costs are too high. Turn the faces of your wear parts or exchange these issues with those from other areas of the equipment that don't wear as much. Run crushing tests with your material on various equipment types. Testing also yields important information about the size reduction process such as particle size distribution before and after crushing, moisture content (which changes during crushing, affecting the material's handling characteristics), power consumption, and estimated wear cost (in terms of how frequently metal parts must be replaced). The test will also determine how well the equipment handles your material's other characteristics, such as friability, abrasiveness, plasticity, and heat sensitivity. Look for unusual wear patterns on parts to detect feed or discharge problems that can be addressed.

Problem: Energy costs are too high. Properly feed the crusher. The feed may not be evenly distributed across the crusher face, or it may not be at the proper choke amount. The feed may not be entering the crusher at the proper angle as it shouldn't initially hit the rotor directly. Try using one machine that can do the entire size reduction job, which will save money and improve your process. Cage mill crushers can achieve up to 40-to-1 size reduction ratios.

Problem: Labor costs are too high. You may be spending too much time unclogging the machine. Moisture can cause material buildup, which can clog the crusher and require long hours of maintenance to clear the crusher. Air cannons can release material clogging impact aprons and impact anvils. If your feed entry chute is clogging because of sticky material, heaters can be used to cause material to slide off the feed entry chute.

Problem: Production levels are too low. You may consider installing a screener prior to the crusher to remove on-size particles from the raw material. This reduces wear on the crusher and minimizes the number of times the material is handled, resulting in a higher profit per ton of material. Impactors can offer a higher production rate without the need for screens if you can afford to have some oversize product.

Problem: Equipment is high-maintenance. Hammer mills may require more maintenance than you prefer. Substituting an impactor is a lower-maintenance choice. Also, a cage mill may be able to reduce your two-stage process to a single-stage size reduction process.

Problem: Equipment isn't used enough. Consider toll processing. Most size reduction equipment suppliers also offer toll crushing services for a fee, which can be valuable in the right circumstances. For instance, you may need toll crushing to help develop a new product or improve or develop a process before investing in new equipment. You may also require toll crushing to meet an intermittent need (such as once per quarter) for crushed material or to obtain crushed material if your company has limited capital for purchasing size reduction equipment.

Problem: Equipment is too dangerous. Explosive materials (very fine airborne dust particles) are often the cause for safety concerns. Introducing water after crushing can offer a solution. In extreme cases with extremely explosive material, water may need to be introduced before crushing but that will increase wear. Problem: Equipment service is poor. A well-maintained crusher will last 20 to 30 years, and your supplier should provide assistance throughout its lifetime. You should have documentation to refer to on start up, commissioning, and training and keep recommended spare parts in stock. Make sure your equipment supplier offers the continuing service you need. Around-the-clock service can be invaluable for emergencies and to address safety concerns.

Problem: Equipment costs are too high. Consider how the crusher affects the process's total energy requirement. For instance, can the crusher you're using yield product with a narrower size range that requires less downstream processing? Cost per ton factors into your product's value. Gold slag obviously requires reclamation but wear part costs can be a 100 times more than for a limestone application. Selecting the proper size reduction method is part science and part experience, and troubleshooting equipment and process problems can be just as difficult. Maintaining your relationship with the supplier over the long-term will also help you stay abreast of new size reduction technology. This will help your operators and maintenance workers evaluate whether updating your equipment or process can improve your product quality, increase the production rate, or reduce your operating costs.

Stedman Machine Company, Aurora, Ind., provides material sizing solutions to the dry bulk solids industry.


Technical content to support your marketing efforts doesn't have to be rocket science. Download our free content guide that is based on fundamental Masters of Business Administration principals, "The purpose of a company is to create and retain customers."

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12 Changes That Will Impact Your SEO Strategy (Or not.)

Mon, May 25, 2015 @ 12:12 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Inbound Marketing, SEO - search engine optimization, Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Internet Marketing, CMS - Content Management System, Industrial Search Engine Optimization - SEO, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Internet Design and Development, Social Media Marketing and Advertising, Internet Development, Content Creation, Internet Advertising, SEO Strategy

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May 25, 2015 // 7:00 AM, From a Hubspot Post with commentary by Chuck Lohre for the industrial search.

Written by Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) | @

seo-changes.png

SEO is a moving target that can really affect your business. This means that as a startup founder, you need to be prepared to make your strategy work no matter what Google enforces.

(Industrial search doesn't move that much. Sites we have done for hugh water pumps ten years ago are working perfectly well today. There product hasn't changed in 50 years. Why should their site? They just keep getting orders from around the world because we wrote the site for people looking for that very unique pump. If we had anything new to say we would, but we don't)

We asked 12 entrepreneurs what trends they have noticed in the past year and how they have prepared their business. Here's what they have noticed:

1) Increasing Attention to the User

In the past, SEO was all about manipulating data and keywords to gain search engine rankings. However with the leak of Google's Quality Rating Guide back in August, it has become crystal clear that modern SEO is all about adding quality rather than quantity. We shifted our entire content marketing strategy to be about the user, creating engaging content that compels our audience to take action.

– Phil LaboonEyeflow Internet Marketing

(Still, you have to use the words that your visitor is searching for. Search engines can't guess what you are thinking.)

2) Optimizing for Mobile Traffic

Google recently started including a 'mobile-friendly' notion next to website for mobile search results. Making sure you have this next your site increases the CTR for your website and the over amount of traffic. I suggest you test your site with this Google tool.

– Yossi FishlerAndy OS, inc.

(It's all the rage but the jury is still out on this when it comes to multi-million dollar machine tools. A very large percentage of those searches are on a desktop and not a tablet or cell phone.)

3) Emphasizing the Importance of Social

Whether it's social sharing from your site or traffic coming from social media, the importance of social engagements is really affecting SEO. It's part of SEO's way of measuring interactions with your pages and content, which are proving to be more and more important. If no one is interacting, it reflects poorly on your page quality and hurts your chances of ranking.

– Brooke BergmanAllied Business Network Inc.

(The largest social feedback we get is when we misspell a word! Of course we were explaining the energy involved in a process and the preventive maintenance procedures.)

4) Identifying Negative SEO

With penalty algorithms, negative SEO can now impact businesses that are not carefully watching their backlinks and other metrics. There have even been studies of sites hit by negative SEOs that sent bogus traffic and negatively impacted bounce rate and CTR from Google SERPs. Watch your link profile, analytics, and be on the lookout for misuse.

– Marcela DeVivo, Gryffin Media

(The only backlinks we have are from industry directories we like and our customers use.)

5) Focusing on Storytelling

Keyword stuffing is a thing of the past. Now, artful storytelling is the only way publishers will get visibility in the SERPs. Our business focuses on helping brands create compelling content with YouTube creators, so updates to the Google algorithm have been immensely helpful in improving our value proposition to clients and the long-term value brands get from their Grapevine campaigns.

– Danny WongGrapevine

(Keyword stuffing doesn't mean not using you keyword in the URL, title, headline and body. That's just common courtesy to the visitor. And to the search engines.)

6) Introducing More Penalties

Our daily tests from 5,000+ sites prove that you will get penalized for both on-site and off-site issues that you may not be aware of. Look closely at the quality of pages you're indexing in Google, eradicate duplicate content, improve your user experience, and ensure you're monitoring your incoming links, disavowing those that are working against your assets. It matters more now than ever before.

– Alex Miller, PosiRank LLC

(We're not sure if this is duplicate content. But it would be if this was a much more popular blog.)

7) Looking for a Google+ Page

If you are a local business, having a website isn't enough to rank well in Google's local search listings. If you want to rank well you need to unlock, verify, and optimize a Google+ Business Page (referred to more recently as a Google My Business Page). If you want to maximize your search traffic from Google, treat your Google Business Page as you would your website, and optimize accordingly.

– Kristopher JonesLSEO.com

(It's fun to update your Google + page. Not sure if it effects much yet.)

8) Aggressively Targeting Blog Networks

At the beginning of 2014, Matt Cutts, head of webspam at Google, announced that the idea of "guest post networks," which had been effective in the past, were on their way out. In the middle of 2014, Google took action against several large networks, including MyBlogGuest, and penalized many high-ranking sites that had participated in linking schemes. Guest bloggers need to rethink their strategy.

– Sathvik TantryFormSwift

(This is the practice of making a post to your blog with a URL to the site they are promoting. They are done by robots and sounc goofy.)

9) Optimizing for User Experience

Where do take your SEO strategy when you've got links, titles, and content covered? Recently we've revamped our site to offer a better user experience. Within three months of rolling out the changes, time on site is up 30% and our bounce rate is down 9%, all while our search traffic is up almost 110%. Google is looking for quality indicators. Make sure your user experience isn't sending the wrong ones.

– Nick ReeseBroadbandNow

(What is a better user experience? Making it easy to find what they are looking for with out looking too busy.)

10) Becoming More Predictable

SEO is now easier than it has ever been thanks to big data. The key to successful SEO is having a strategy in place that records your previous efforts, compares those efforts to your current results, and then predicts which activities will provide the most value in the future. SEO was an art before big data. Now it is a science.

– Roger BryanEnfusen Digital Marketing

(Determine the keywords that are important to your business. Write your content to educate the visitor about those topics. If you don't rank, buy AdWords, but never stop trying to rank free naturally. We have retired AdWord programs after the client's site was ranking naturally for all the important phrases.)

11) Using Location as a Source

Since we are a global identity verification company, it's important to understand how changes in Pigeon's algorithm would affect the visibility of our website in local listings.

– Stephen UffordTrulioo

(Even un-local purchasing is effected by location. Local offices and sales reps are the cause.)

12) Optimizing for Entity Search

We're always looking for opportunities to increase our footprint in Google's search results. With more search queries 'answered' directly in Google's search results, we only need to spend a few hours of development to be eligible for inclusion. As semantic markup expands to identify more entities, our business will be relevant for more complex and user-specific queries.

– Andrew SaladinoKitchen Cabinet Kings

(What he means is, if the visitor can get their answer by never clicking on your link, Google has succeeded. But a tree does make a sound even is no one is there to hear it.)

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Industrial Marketing Sales is Tied To Content

Wed, Apr 15, 2015 @ 04:47 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Marketing Strategy, Industrial Marketing Content, Content Creation

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Inspired by a post by Kieran Flanagan, April 8, 2014 at 11:00 AM. Kieran is HubSpot's EMEA Marketing Director. He is an experienced inbound marketer, having previously worked for large brands in both B2C and B2B across EMEA.

In a recent study Hubspot conducted with SmartInsights, the top challenge for marketers was measuring the ROI of content. According to Driving Content Marketing Success45% of European marketers cited measuring ROI and producing enough quality content as their top challenge.

 

The Indicators of Content Success

A typical marketing funnel can be broken out into three sections -- top of the funnel (TOFU), middle of the funnel (MOFU), and bottom of the funnel (BOFU). 

Forging_Magazine_Mar-Apr_2014


Using Content to Power TOFU

Content being used for a company's TOFU strategy should:

  • Help to grow your audience and get them engaging with the content you publish.
  • Encourage people to spend time on your site, getting them to read your content and visit additional pages.
  • Increase your traffic from organic channels, and get them to take an action on your site that shows you're attracting the right kind of people.

Q. Are people on social engaging with your content?

Use LinkedIn Company Page analytics to give you a sense of how your content is doing, where your followers are coming from, and show you performance trends across defined periods of time. LinkedIn has also recently added more tools to help analyze the performance of your content with a content marketing score and trending topics site.

Q. What is the performance of the content you’re adding to your site? 

Looking at your marketing analytics can give you an idea of how the content on you're site is performing. Is it attracting people into your site (visits), what's the initial impression of that content (bounce rate), do people stick around to read that content (time on page), and are people clicking around to read more of your pages (page views).

HubSpot can show you the performance of that content across your entire funnel (what we call closed-looped analytics), and Google Analytics can be a nice complement, as well, to look at some of those valuable TOFU metrics.

Q. Is content helping you to increase visits?

Producing quality content should help to increase the visits. This is another strong indicator that your content is starting to produce positive results.

Q. Are people taking an action on your site that indicates they're the right type of people?

There is no point in attracting visits from inbound channels if they're not taking any action on your site. This action could be signing up to your newsletter, viewing a particular page on your site, or converting into a lead (contact). 

rohr_clamshell_dredge_bulletin


Using Content to Power MOFU & BOFU

Content being created and used for a company's MOFU and BOFU strategy should:

  • Educate people in your funnel about your product and how it can solve their challenges
  • Create opportunities, pipeline, and sales for the business

Q. How many people are opening your emails, clicking on links, and returning visitors?

Open and click rates can provide a proxy to determine if you're sending the right content to the right people. 

If you have lead nurture proceedures set up, you'll want to know if the people in that workflow are engaging with that content, and if it's successfully moving people through your funnel.

Q. Is your content helping to generate opportunities, pipeline, and customers?

You can start to measure content at this stage of the funnel by the number of customers it creates.

Look at the number of opportunities and pipeline that was created by a piece of content. This would give you a sense of how it performed, and it's how we measure the performance of our MOFU/BOFU content on my team at HubSpot.

planet_products_frankloader_ad


The Content ROI

Trying to figure out the ROI of time invested in content is the right thing to do, but you need to clearly define the goals of your content, align these across your funnel, and choose the metrics that are going to serve as indicators of your success. Doing this will give you a better picture of how content is performing across your funnel and what areas may need to be improved upon.


 If you liked this post you may like, "B2B Website Checklist for Industrial Marketing"


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It's 9:23 p.m. and we haven't written our industrial marketing idea blog

Wed, Feb 05, 2014 @ 09:41 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Ideas, Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, Marketing Content, Content Creation

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We got off to a great start this year by blogging every working day on industrial marketing ideas. We wouldn't want to break our record, so I'm just going to tell it like it is.

A few reasons we are doing this:

    1. We love to teach. It has given us great pleasure to teach marketing to our employees, and they have taught us as much as we have.
    2. We enjoy complex industrial marketing communication problems. Although most communication problems aren't that complex they are getting there because the web has created a four dimensional system that challenges our brains.
    3. It's fun to get people to stop and look. And do something. Search on, "blind man video geIndustrial Marketing Ideas by Purplefeatherts sign makeover" and you'll find on the first page ""What did you do to my sign?" - The Power Of Words, Motivation." A blind man has a sign that says, "I'm blind. Please help." A woman stops, turns his sign over and writes, "It's a beautiful day and I can't see it." The man gets ten times the donations. We haven't tried it, but that's the idea. It's a part of the "Change Your Words and Change Your World" campaign by Purplefeather online content specialists.
    4. Industrial Marketing Ideas Knoll ChairWe like to change the world by example. Besides helping our clients and many non-profits get the word out we also believe in sustainability and spent more time than money achieving LEED Platinum on our offices. A recent fun fact is that we scored four fantastic Knoll ergonomic chairs at the University of Cincinnati salvage sale. We've been dying to get our hands on a set of these hard to find posture improvers to put into place the Ergonomic Seating Innovation in Design U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) credit point. It will include keyboard mounts and or foot rests along with training by a Certified Professional Ergonomist on how to sit and work properly.
    5. We love to write. The promotional bang for the buck with writing is much higher than graphics. We love to take photos, paint and work on the computer, but until Google indexes eyeballs we're going to have to learn to use the pen.
    6. And last, we like to get up and do it every day. See you again tomorrow. Thanks for reading this far. Oh, and, by the way, check out Grammarly, it helps a lot. 10:16 p.m.

If you liked this post, you would like our second most popular post, "How to Write a Telemarketing Script for Marketing Communications."

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Hubspot’s 30-day Blogging Challenge - Two industrial marketing results we earned and learned

Fri, Jan 31, 2014 @ 11:55 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Ideas, Industrial Advertising, Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Business to Business Marketing, Marketing Content, Business to Business Advertising, Content Creation

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  1. It grew our traffic 30%
  2. Post relevant posts

Industrial Marketing SuccessYes, we have grown from 1000 visitors a month to almost 1500 per month. We met our goal. We chose that because Hubspot's average of industry traffic indicates that 1500 visitors per month should deliver one new customer. Perhaps we will need to continue for two months with no new customers and get two on the third month, but that metric is extremely important to know. More and better content on your website will deliver customers. And you must find out what that content amount will be. Top of the list? It must be thoughtful, relevant content that educates your visitors and encourages them to take action -- namely to develop interest in your product and contact you. You can easily drive that increase in traffic with Google adwords, but if your content isn't educational and nurturing, it won't deliver the desired results.

We have quite a bit of work to do on our site to increase the unique Calls To Action > Landing Pages. Currently we have a Creative, Sales Lead Generation, and a Website Content eBook. We need to have a Visitor Increase Guide and an Email Guide. Both of those can bookend the Sales Lead Generation Guide. Our Creative Guide needs to be rewritten and then it can be an email to those that downloaded it. The same with the Sales Lead Generation and Web Site Content Guides.

Another part of our business is Green Building Consulting and we need Guides on building a Green Home or Office. We get a steady stream of persons wanting to participate in our Green Associate internships, so that's working without an email campaign. Not so lucky with our Green Marketing services. We'd love a major building product company with continually changing product lines. That's the bread and butter for marketing communications firms.

Our posts are now always relevant to either the jobs at hand in the office or in response to a peer's blog. (At least then you know you can count on at least one reader!) Our most successful post centered on six of our fellow bloggers. We reached out and promoted them and their interests. Wildly successful. It seems like the internet is mostly marketers. Duh! At least when we get big and strong we'll have some resources to call on. As active as we have become on the blogosphere, it's not something you can teach effectively. Either you like to write or you don't. Luckily we "see" a ton of stuff to write about.

Industrial marketing IdeasWe've added Wistia to the three videos on our site and the results are, in a word, pitiful. But it's better to know one thing versus knowing that you know nothing. We'll still keep the "Make Love Not Spam" Hubspot video on our home page for now. The other two are very complicated educational videos related to Green Building, and that's both a blessing and a curse. We have to think about how to lighten it up. How to make some shorter more entertaining videos.

Industrial Marketing Ideas TodayIn the end, we have great clients that have entrusted us with their websites, media placements, public relations, photography and literature production. They look to us to establish and maintain a level of communication needed to be successful with the internet, which they recognize will make or break their companies. Once we show success, they'll see. The publications we work with are incredibly savvy about internet marketing and manage databases with tens of thousands of professional engineers and industrial managers. Those managers depend on the publications e-newsletters to get their everyday news -- that's today's internet reality. It's not much different than what Hubspot teaches every marketer: create great content that attracts subscribers and push it out. We're doing our best to "Build it."  You can bet were sticking  until (as they say in the movies) "They will come." Thanks to Frankly My Dear Mojo for the photo.


If you liked this post, you may also like our most popular post, "Review: "Designing B2B Brands" for industrial marketing communications."


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