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"Catch Some Rays" with Your Mining Equipment Marketing "Battery!"

Fri, May 05, 2017 @ 04:32 PM / by Bill Langer posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Industrial Advertising, Marketing, Industrial Branding, Process Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Business to Business Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Process Equipment Marketing News Release

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Gravel Batteries - As green energy proponents address its intermittent nature, good old-fashioned gravel may provide a solution.


Renewable energy is becoming more and more popular these days. We recently jumped on the band wagon and had solar panels installed on our home in Anthem, Ariz. On average, we have 299 sunny days per year, so it is a pretty darn good investment.

The down side to energy from solar panels and wind turbines is their on-off nature. When the wind stops blowing or the sun stops shining, the energy production stops. That is not a problem for us, because we are still connected to the grid and can get power even when the sun doesn’t shine. But believe me — they know how to charge rate payers who have solar! 

Mining Equipment Marketing Fun.jpg 

In order to make solar and wind commercially viable, there needs to be some method to store excess energy production for use when there is no sunshine, no wind, or during peak demand. Electricity cannot be stored easily, but construction of a new battery gigafactory in the United States, as well as other high-tech methods on the horizon, may be part of the solution.
 
While we wait for new technology to catch on, there are some pretty good solutions already in place. Some environmen-tally friendly methods use — you guessed it — gravel. In terms of supply chain, handling, and construction, few materials are as cost effective, easy to obtain, and simple to use as gravel.
 
The most common method to store energy is pumped hydro storage. During excess solar or wind production periods, water is pumped uphill into a reservoir. During low or non-production periods, the water flows down through a generator to a lower reservoir. Very simple; very easy. However, hydro storage takes up a lot of space. An idea is being batted around where the water and reservoirs would be replaced by huge buckets filled with gravel. Excess energy produced will be used to haul the rock uphill in a ski-lift kind of contraption. When energy is needed, gravity will carry the rock downhill, producing electricity on its downhill trip.
 
There are a few somewhat more sophisticated ideas in the works, where excess energy is converted to thermal energy and then stored in giant gravel “batteries,” thus evening out the intermittent nature of wind turbines and solar panels.
 
One example is in Steinfurt, Germany. Rather than build an expensive tank, the battery is constructed underground in a covered pit. The storage material is a mixture of gravel and water. The side walls, top, and bottom are heat-insulated. The pit has a double-sided polypropylene liner with a vacuum control to identify leaks, and the liner is protected from the gravel by a layer of fleece.
 
When excess energy is available, heated water (195 degrees F) ‘charges’ the battery, either by direct water exchange (right side of the illustration) or via plastic pipes (left side of illustration). The hot water is stored until it is needed, at which time the water flow is reversed.
 
The use of rocks for thermal storage is attractive because rocks are not toxic, non-flammable, and inexpensive. The main problem I see with gravel batteries is convincing my wife to allow me to tear up our entire backyard landscaping and fish pond so I can replace it with a big hole filled with gravel and pipes. Is that really too much to ask? AM
 
Read the original article here in AGGREGATES MANAGER April 2017, thanks Bill for contributing to our Mining Equipment Marketing blog. Have a great weekend.

If you would like to learn more about writing a process equipment marketing news release or an application story "One key to good public relations is writing a case study."


 

Trade Display Designs by Lohre Advertising to Boost Presence and Impact

 

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Synchronous Motors and Drives - OEM Marketing

Sun, Apr 23, 2017 @ 10:37 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Marketing, Industrial Branding, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Industrial Marketing Content, OEM Marketing

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4 ABM Drives Synchronous Motors and Drives 400.jpgThe following is an example of an OEM Marketing publicity campaign for an OEM to specify ABM Drives as an assembly for their equipment. It starts with basic educational publicity as the foundation for a modern internet marketing campaign. Marketing today is based on the fact that customers are educating themselves well in advance, before contacting any potential suppliers. They are doing this almost exclusively on the internet. Unless a company plays a role in the engineer’s education, they stand little chance of being the preferred supplier for a new product component. Traditional technical journals, many still in print, are the gate-keepers of the best technical content. Good publicity campaigns work with the editors and publishers of the trade journals as well as technical conferences. If your educational publicity campaigns are picked up by the technical press, you can be assured that it is worthy of investment, because of the long life the educational material will have, and the many ways it can be repurposed as video, audio, slide shows, demonstrations and presentations. 


Custom Sinochron® Synchronous Motors and Drives can Operate without and Encoder

The SINOCHRON® Motor design offers advantages in continuous duty applications. The efficiency is also better in partially loaded duty cycles, when compared to standard asynchronous motors. Drive units are virtually loss-free in no-load operation. This motor design offers advantages in powering conveying equipment; escalators, spooling machines, compressors and traction drive units amongst others. By substituting existing line powered three-phase drive units, energy savings of 20 to 35 percent can be expected.

SINOCHRON® is a synchronous motor with high-performance permanent magnets with a sinusoidal flux distribution (EMF). The anisotropic rotor geometry provides a sinusoidal distribution of the magnetic flux with the result of eliminating cogging. Stator windings are identical to asynchronous motor windings allowing for a cost-efficient production of the stators in large batch sizes. The SINOCHRON® Motor operates without an encoder and can replace a stepper motor in some applications. This patented technology combines high output, minimal investment and low operating cost.

The characteristic profile of these drive units makes them well suited to drive pumps and fans that operate continuously, no additional components, like encoders, are needed. Up to 30 percent smaller footprint, allows machine designs to be more compact. The motors have excellent control behavior and combined with included control unit SDC, have excellent true running even at very low speeds and impressive dynamics at impulse load and speed variations.

Continuous duty pumps and fans are now required to meet new efficiency regulations which require line powered three-phase motors and geared-motors with rated outputs of 0.2 up to 9.0 kW operating continuously at rated load (duty cycle S1) to be a minimum of efficiency class IE3 (premium efficiency) or IE2-drive units to be equipped with electronic inverters. Inverter powered SINOCHRON® Motors from ABM Drives economically meet these requirements.

About ABM DRIVES INC.

ABM DRIVES INC. engineers and manufacturers high-performance motor, gearbox, brake and frequency inverter solutions for machines, plants and mobile devices in hoisting technology, warehousing, material handling, electric vehicles, biomass heating systems, wind turbines and many other markets. Founded in 1927, the company belongs to the Senata Group with an annual turnover of nearly 400 million € and more than 2,000 employees. Approximately 300,000 drive units are produced annually. In-house manufacturing includes tool-and-die design, aluminum-casting foundry, CNC housing machining, manufacturer of shafts, cutting of gear teeth, motor development technology, assembly and final testing.

PRESS CONTACT

ABM DRIVES INC.

Gabriel Venzin, President

394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 110, Loveland, OH 45140

Phone: 513-576-1300

Mobile: 513-332-7256

E-mail: gabriel.venzin@abm-drives.com

Website: www.abm-drives.com

AGENCY
Lohre & Assoc., Inc., Marketing Communications

Chuck Lohre, President

126A West 14th Street, 2nd Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202-7535

Phone: 877-608-1736, 513-961-1174, Fax 513-961-1192
Mobile: 513-260-9025
Email: chuck@lohre.com

Reprinting permitted - specimen copy requested


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Metal Working Equipment Marketing Plan

Fri, Mar 17, 2017 @ 05:04 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing Communications, Marketing, Industrial Branding, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Industrial Marketing Content

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To ThomasNet or not to ThomasNet, that is the question. Hmm, it means blogging to the rescue!

Industrial marketing communications directoryThomasNet, or Thomas Register as it was called years ago, has become a Platinum Hubspot resaler. It's not much of a directory any more since they couldn't compete with Google.  They are a good blogger as a good Hubspot dealer should be. A directory program with ThomasNet runs at least several thousands of dollars to start, but like our advice for purchasing search engine ad words, "Don't do it until you have optimized your web site first." We've found that ThomasNet's directory is only good in certain industries that have adopted it as a platform to generate quotes. But even those are going away and Thomas' attempts to teach newbes is a losing attempt.

You'd think a "large machine shop" would be easy enough to get ranked for, but that's not the case. If metal working equipment marketing was easy, everyone would be doing it. The industry is quite sophisticated and run by those who have been operating computers longer than any of us. The second use of computers was to run a machine tool, the first was to calculate ballistic information for a canon. 

ThomasNet wasn't such a problem several years ago, it kept its data secret from the search engines, plus it didn't have very many pages indexed. And the search engines wouldn't show their pages anyway. Then ThomasNet signed agreements with the search engines and they are ranking better. But Google is fundamentally against a directory since Google would rather serve the company's web site rather than a directory. ThomasNet is a very good media for increasing your page visitors. We have seen traffic double in several cases. And our studies show that visitors coming from ThomasNet are just as high quality as those coming from organic searches. If your site is fairly well written and has all the regular features of a good site, like fast loading speed, there may not be any other way to increase traffic. See the chart results on ThomasNet.com for yourself at Alexa.com.

Metal Working Equipment Marketing.jpg
But all of this wouldn't be needed if you just blogged a lot more. It's the gift that keeps on giving. Looking at the chart above, we added all of the client's technical bulletins in the middle and started bloggin three times a week in the last third. If your website traffic isn't growing like this, you aren't marketing using the internet to your advantage.

So if there is one take-away it's this -- Program your site to measure goals. For industrial sites it's not a sale, it's going to be a contact us or a request for quotation page. Then you will be able to measure a tangible result of your industrial marketing efforts.


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Plan for an Industrial Content Driven Marketing campaign

Fri, Jan 20, 2017 @ 04:54 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Graphic Design Agency, Advertising Agency, Industrial Content Driven Marketing

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Consumer media is getting very fractured, but industrial content driven marketing is still led by a few quality publishing houses. 

Sure you can spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on full page ads every month in your industrial trade publications. But you wouldn't be taking advantage of the invitation to supply educational and application articles to the publication as well. Industrial marketing is a partnership between you and the industrial publishing houses. And that includes trade shows as well. The best publishing companies also have the best shows.

 Industrial-Content-Marketing.jpg

 

But don't start your Industrial Content Driven Marketing by dropping your advertising programs. Sure industrial engineers use the Internet to find products and services but most times they aren't looking for cheap high volumes. LinkedIn Groups can't reach the audience a good industrial trade journal can. They have been at it for generations and even though many of them are getting slim they are getting better at serving up great content online. It is sort of like asking a 60 year old to start dating again but they are. Google wants to serve up the best results for their searchers and the vetted trade journals are the best. You can't find manufacturing engineering as a company description on Facebook. They keep asking us to change our client's descriptions to "Local Service."

So trim your advertising budget down to three placements a year in the top two or three publications and also make a commitment to provide two or three articles. They will cost you several thousand dollars each but they will be the gift that keeps on giving. If they rank well on the internet you can also promote them with Google, Bing or LinkedIn Adwords or Sponsored Content. Better yet tie your advertising to your content.

Industrial-Content-Driven-Marketing.jpg

The featured image in this blog post is the advertisement that promotes the technical article above. The article also goes on the client's website. Ads today are like landing pages on the internet. They are to promote a piece of content. How Hubspot would like you to get folks to exchange their email address for that content but that is much harder to achieve. Still, you can track how many visitors come to your site from the ads and content. And then adjust your media buy next year. 

And that sums up what's happening in the industrial marketing world. Publications are trying to migrate over to being completely digital not because they want to but because their readers are dying off. The editorial teams will continue to rule the content world, now we just have to find a way to pay them.

 

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Economical, Custom, Modular Motors and Drives

Fri, Jan 13, 2017 @ 01:40 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Graphic Design, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertising Literature, Graphic Design Agency, Cincinnati Design, Design Agency, Advertising Agency

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ABM motors and drives are tailor-made specifically for the application whether it requires compact design, low-noise operation or maximum operating safety.

A flexible modular design system allows cost-effective low volume production runs. Custom motors and drives are available for a wide range of application types: forklifts, electric vehicles, lifting technology, biomass heating systems, textile machines, wind power control, warehouse logistics, high-speed doors, air compressors, construction equipment, packaging machinery and vehicle-inspection equipment. The high overall efficiency of ABM Drive helical and parallel shaft gearboxes reduces power input and energy consumption.

ABM-Drives-Economical-Custom-Motors-and-Drives-1.jpg

All products are engineered in-house. Components that represent a core competence are reliably produced in-house on state-of-the-art machine systems. This guarantees that electric motors, gearboxes, brakes and electronics are perfectly coordinated. Vertical integration of ABM Drive manufacturing includes tool-and-die engineering and aluminum die-casting to guarantee best implementation and integration of components to a compact drive unit. High-quality gearing guarantees quiet operation. Tight-fitting housing covers and flanges prevent distortions that can amplify noise. Aluminum housings absorb harmonics and other vibrations better than cast iron. 

A large center distance between the motor centerline and the hollow drive shaft centerline gives the application designer more freedom/clearance to integrate the unit into the application. Many layouts are possible, from integration of the motor into the gearbox housing, U mounting of the motor, to customizing the output shaft. The end result is a true plug-and-play motor and drive-unit solution designed to save time and money.

ABM DRIVE INC. engineers and manufacturers high-performance motor, gearbox, brake and frequency inverter solutions for machines, plants and mobile devices in hoisting technology, warehousing, material handling, electric vehicles, biomass heating systems, wind turbines and many other markets. Founded in 1927, the company belongs to the senata Group with an annual turnover of nearly 400 million € and more than 2,000 employees. Approximately 300,000 drive units are produced annually. In-house manufacturing includes tool-and-die design, aluminum-casting foundry, CNC housing machining, manufacturer of shafts, cutting of gear teeth, motor development technology, assembly and final testing.

PRESS CONTACT
ABM DRIVE INC.
Gabriel Venzin, President
394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 110, Loveland, OH 45140
Phone: 513 576 1300
Mobile: 513 332 7256
Website: www.abm-drives.com
E-mail: gabriel.venzin@abm-drives.com

AGENCY

Lohre & Assoc., Inc., Marketing Communications

Chuck Lohre, President
126A West 14th Street, 2nd Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202-7535
Phone: 877-608-1736, 513-961-1174, Fax 513-961-1192
Mobile: 513-260-9025
Email: chuck@lohre.com

Reprinting permitted - specimen copy requested

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"Designing B2B Brands" - B2B Branding Lessons Update

Thu, Dec 29, 2016 @ 04:56 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Graphic Design, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertising Literature, Graphic Design Agency, Cincinnati Design, Design Agency, Advertising Agency

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Branding lessons from Deloitte and 195,000 brand managers, by Carlos Martinez Onaindia & Brian Resnick. 

For our last post of 2016 we'd like to update our third most popular blog post ever. This book still stands out as the best B2B Branding Lessons we have ever seen. Get in touch if you would like a free copy.

Designing B2B Brands.jpg

Carlos Martinez Onaindia & Brian Resnick worked for Deloitte while writing the book.

Hubspot included Deloitte and GE websites in one of its promotional blog posts and we recognize them as a good examples of industrial marketing communications design. It's great news that we can go into more detail with one of our choices.

Designing B2B Brands, Ten Laws resized 600

Number 9. "Always be closing" is close to our heart; it emphasizes the objective of marketing communications. "Every communication should focus on achieving your end goal, and the audience should feel good about, or at least comfortable with, that result," perfectly sums up landing pages and calls-to-action.

Designing B2B Brands, Proposals resized 600

This chart brings to light some of Deloitte's strategies: "2. Understand - Get under the skin of the client and use the opportunity to better Deloitte's comparative competitive position, 4. Interact - Take every opportunity to demonstrate our credentials, improve our understanding and test The Deloitte Difference with the client, 8. Capitalize - Make the most of your investment by debriefing the team and the client, learning from what the client tells us, and developing on ongoing strategy to win work from the client." These strategies can be put to use for industrial equipment selling as well.

Designing B2B Brands, Executive Champions resized 600

This chart illustrates how a company's strategy's affects the message, "Lead by example, as their (executives) decisions have a direct impact on brand legacy and will ripple throughout the organization."

Feintool Achieve More With Less resized 600

Heinz Loosli, CEO of Feintool International Holding discusses the strategic advantage of Feintool in this interview for its customer magazine. In response to a question about the company's recovery from the automotive industry decline in 2009, he answers, "We brought new, innovative products to market, we have played more to our strengths and in doing so achieved some great successes in the market. We have also improved our ability to complete by implementing measures to increase efficiency. It is important to appreciate that it is not a case of one-off actions but ongoing commitment that will ensure our company has a successful future. The motto is: achieve more with less. We are constantly working on this..." This statement reflects both the company's equipment's strategic advantages but also good business practices. Feintool's metal part-making equipment takes plate steel and produces parts that are assembly ready without post machining. Their machines achieve more with less material and processing -- Loosli is using the same analogy for the company's management practises. You can download the entire Feintool magazine here. For the North American edition, Lohre & Associates wrote two articles, edited and printed the publication here in Cincinnati. We are honored to work with Feintool's Cincinnati offices and we feel the company's marketing communications are equal to Deloitte's.

Barry Salzberg's opening message for the book brings to light a similar focus, "There are 195,000 professionals around the world actively shaping the Deloitte identity on a daily basis. Brand-building of that scale requires a relentless focus on a unified vision and shared values, alongside a dynamic culture. There's tremendous opportunity if you get this right."

Heather Hancock, Global Managing Partner, Brand, defines Deloitte's businesss this way: "Deloitte is an advisory business whose brand relies on the daily actions of nearly 200,000 people in more than 150 countries being connected and reflecting the sane core commitments. We connect our people and our brand in myriad ways, always informed by a deep understanding of the marketplace and our clients' needs. And we take the long view, remaining committed to the task at hand whilst building value for our clients and our own firm long into the future. It delivers us client and personal growth, risk insulation and trust."

Designing B2B Brands, Faith The chart on the left gives insight to the reasons an industrial brand is of value: reputation, risk mitigation, client-building, loyalty and pride leads to the correlation between targeted brand investment and growth rate. Deloitte's business is deep market understanding to solve client problems. In a way industrial equipment is the same, the equipment is engineered to be an effective way for a company to be in business. Every company has to continually evolve to meet market changes, employee education and financial obligations. Deloitte is in the business of communication; many businesses are in the business of delivering a product. For a manufacturing company to understand the value of brand, it has to have an extremely clear understanding of the technology, engineering, economics of the market and the future. Every component in a machine tells the history of the company's brand. Someone at every company knows that story and that is where the brand starts.


We'll continue to look for branding examples that manufacturing company's can use to improve their marketing communications. If you get in touch to review your brand, we'll send you the Kindle version of this book. You'll enjoy it!

We can't begin to include all the great graphical information and examples in this review. The book covers every conceivable graphic problem and the solutions, meant more for the marketing communications manager of a company than the chief executives. In this review we wanted to climb to the 10,000-foot view of branding that often gets lost when you're manufacturing industrial equipment. But it does apply and Deloitte does a great job.

Hopefully GE will come out with a similar edition, they are in the machinery business! Writing those specifications and creating 3 views to make the brand come alive is what we do every day.

HOW Magazine introduced us to this 2013 book published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., it's about Deloitte's branding and its implementation throughout the organization. We saw an ad on HOW's website.

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Manufacturing Industrial Brand Marketing

lead gen ebook resized 125

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Industrial Social Media for Quarries

Fri, Jul 29, 2016 @ 04:13 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content

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 (Thanks to Trevor Hall, Founder, Clear Creek Digital, for this great article in the July/August 2016 STONE SAND & GRAVEL REVIEW. We thought it was just going to be another marketer that was selling industrial social media to accounts that didn't use it industrially themselves let alone actually have experience working in a quarry, but Trevor is the real deal and has some good tips for quarries to improve their community relations.)


Social Media Can Help Improve an Operation

industrial-social-media.jpgOUR ONLINE NEWS FEEDS and social media accounts are more and more filled with websites and articles with catchy titles like "Top 5 Amazing Survivor Stories," "10 Apps for your iPhone," "8 Rocks That Look Like Celebrities." We all, myself included, get caught wanting to know more about these headlines. Many times we click and visit the information.

Called "listicles," these articles blend a list with short articles, and there are lessons to be learned from them. People read them because they appear - and typically are - quick to read, have an enthusiastic tone and spur creative disruption in our own minds. Most importantly, though, they grab our attention.

Everyone online is hammered with copious amounts of information every second of the day. Figuring out how to grab people's attention, even just for a few seconds, is a very challenging task. What is most daunting, espe­cially for quarries, is understanding how to communicate a very complex process like aggregates production with many different internal func­tions and processes in a quick, eye­catching and engaging message.

Finding ways to incorporate the kind of content that catches the eye of our industry and our communities, including residents near stone, sand and gravel operations, is a vital part of any community relations plan.

Know the Social Networks

Social networks like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube pro­vide new tools for aggregates opera­tions to tell their story.

Twitter: Posts are 140 characters or less, so it's important to link back to blogs or information on a different website.

Facebook: Users can share photos, videos and updates about a quarry or company with a "page" that is dedi­cated to that company or operation.

LinkedIn: A professional social network where users post their work experience and look for jobs. Companies also create pages on LinkedIn to share content.

YouTube: Users can share and com­ment on videos, which is one of the most popular and engaging forms of media today. These digital tools can/enhance a company's ability to engage neighbors, lawmakers and regulators. Also, these networks can be used to inform a pub­lic of something they may not know much about, including quarrying.

Online media's reach is huge and increasing. A majority of the global population is on some type of social network. With the growth of mobile technologies reaching even to rural Africa, many more people are likely to join. Further, the data shows that online social dialogues and infor­mation sharing are not just for a younger crowd anymore. Social media users 65 years of age and older have more than tripled in the past five years.

Recognize and Use Social Media Trends

It is vital that aggregates opera­tions recognize the trends of the online audience and appreciate its huge and growing size. Notice, I did not suggest that companies become "masters" of digital marketing. But recognition of best digital commu­nication trends can lead you on a wonderful path to exploring how to tell the story of your operation or your products.

Online and mobile video will also play an important role for every busi­ness and operation. It is predicted that by 2020, 80 percent of people will rely on video content to form opinions and/or support for busi­nesses and organizations. Aggregates producers are not exempt from this trend, and can enhance traditional community outreach with videos and photos.

Print publications or text on a screen can be enhanced with multi­media content that is easy to share with people who both support or are critical of a quarry.

Short and Shareable is the Way to Go

Try to grab attention of an online audience by using powerful and quick information. This is especially true for social media networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram because they rely on images and photos in addition to text.

Photos and video play crucial roles in grabbing the attention of view­ers. The more engaging your con­tent is, the more likely you are to see an increase in viewers. YouTube, the popular video-sharing site, is the second largest social network­ing site behind Facebook. More people are turning to YouTube to share and gather information than ever before.

For example, every day people are watching YouTube to learn how gran­ite is quarried and crushed, and there are videos with thousands of views on how limestone is produced.

Stone, sand and gravel companies can connect the value of their opera­tions to the personal benefit of the reader and their community. Right now, there aren't many aggregates producers in the United States fully utilizing social and digital media to share company information. So there is a great opportunity for companies and quarries to produce quality and positive content about the industry.

Using Social Media to Build a Brand

In print and online communica­tions, the words we use matter a lot. The recent presidential campaign has shown how audiences react to words used in tweets and images shared on Facebook.

Some people on social networks may negatively respond to a com­pany's content, regardless of how informative and engaging posts may be. One of the best ways to safeguard one's messaging from these tribula­tions is to make your content fun. Allow your organization to pull the curtains back a bit and show the human and humanitarian aspects of your company. It is harder for posi­tive and educational content to be perceived as anything but, and using facts and information is also a great way to address negative comments you may receive.

Staying positive, engaging and edu­cational is a great way to highlight employees, the communities you work with and the dynamic ways that rocks are quarried and crushed and shipped to customers. After all, the adventures of quar­rying are wonderful stories. It's up to you to share them. •

Trevor Hall is the founder of Clear Creek Digital, LLC, a digital communications and marketing firm focused on provid­ing those resources to mining and engi­neering organizations. Visit his website at www.clearcreekdigital.com.


(Thanks Trevor, Having a high performance site is the number one industrial marketing challenge, get it right and your industrial social media will pay off big.)


Cincinnati's Full-service Industrial Advertising Agency

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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12 Questions Every Manufacturer Should Ask Themselves

Wed, Jul 20, 2016 @ 11:12 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content

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 (Thanks to Ken Maisch for this great article in the July 15, 2016 Cincinnati Business Courier. If you don't know the competition and the marketplace, you won't be able to grow your business.)

Ken_Maisch.jpgRecently I attended an economic briefing session to get some insight into where the economists saw us heading over a period of time. After the meeting, while I was reviewing the data we received, I began to think about TechSolve’s client companies and how they were preparing for changes in their customer’s needs, based on changing economics, and how they were and should be planning for future changes.

Over the last year, I have seen the business of some of my clients slow as much as 30%. On the other hand, I saw some of those client companies serving, growing, and thriving markets. I asked myself how each of these client groups was dealing with their particular circumstance. Our experience shows that client companies in a rapid growth mode are usually behind the curve and have to take exceptional steps to deal with this growth. It also shows that companies who see a drop in business usually go into a full blown pull back, as if their future will never be there again.

There will always be changes in our business cycles. There will always be new products and there will always be products that become obsolete. The “key” to sustaining a viable manufacturing company is based on its ability to deal with these changing environments. How nimble these companies are in changing times determines their overall ability to grow and continue a pattern of profitability.

There are twelve questions manufacturing companies should constantly ask themselves as they examine the future. Those are:

1) Are we intimately familiar with the market we serve?

2) How well do we know our competition?

3) What are the changing aspects of that market?

4) Is there a consolidation of players within that market?

5) How much of our overall revenue is represented by our top five customers?

6) Are we getting downward pricing pressure from that customer base?

7) Do we see increasing raw material costs?

8) Are we experiencing annual increases in our manufacturing costs that we can’t pass on to our customer base?

9) Are we consistently upgrading our equipment to maintain productivity?

10) Is “lean” thinking a part of our company culture?

11) Are we having difficulty in finding and keeping capable workers?

12) Is “productivity improvement” a part of our overall plan?

If you don’t know the answers to a majority of these questions I believe you will find life in a manufacturing environment to be difficult at best. Let’s take these questions and boil them down into three groups.

1) Market knowledge and marketing capability

2) Equipment capability and utilization

3) Productivity and cost control

Now let’s take a look at each area as they pertain to today’s manufacturing environment.

Market Knowledge and Marketing Capability

A thorough knowledge of your targeted market is essential. Knowing all the players, the competitive pricing levels each offers, and at what level you are competitive within this market enables more accurate quotations leading to a higher hit rate. We find this an area of weakness within some of our client base. Some know the names of primary competition, but aren’t sure at what level their pricing must be to earn new business. In the absence of this knowledge, companies price their products on what they perceive are the prices their competitors charge without a relationship between their real costs and the profit margins available at that level of pricing.

In addition to these pricing issues, it is imperative that companies understand the best way to address their target market. What is the best way to attract new customers? Is the internet and other electronic media the best way to find and get new customers? Is a more traditional sales approach preferable? Is direct customer contact better than a less direct approach. Does your product have an engineering or sales element? In all cases it is a must that you understand the “who” within your market. It is important to know who is the sales leader within your market, who is the “price” leader within your market, and which competitor has the strongest reputation and the “why” that is. Simply selecting a market in the absence of this knowledge can be a recipe for disaster. Growth in a new market or customer base can be much more successful if the answers to these questions are understood and addressed in the early planning stages.

Equipment Capability and Utilization

Businesses evolve and change over time. When manufacturing companies begin they usually locate and use the most economical equipment they can afford. Not always the most productive, but it gets the job done. Then over time they begin to invest in new technology and equipment that offers significant productivity advantages. They realize this is the long term answer to better controlling their costs. If new equipment is good, more must be better. Not always the correct solution. It is imperative that this new more productive equipment reach full utilization as quickly as possible. Otherwise the cost of having that equipment becomes a draw against profitability as our employees scramble to get it fully utilized and still keep the old equipment running.

New technology is only an advantage when it increases capacity and lowers cost. Owning and underutilizing the newest equipment will only increase cost, not improve the situation. As a process improvement company we understand and agree with consistently improving productivity, and when equipment is the answer, do the necessary economic justification and purchase the new equipment. Making sure that you understand your productivity levels and how it relates to your overall cost, is a must. And once you understand the importance of long term productivity improvements, budget to upgrade your equipment as your depreciation schedule dictates. The most productive companies we serve are those that justify and utilize the most efficient systems available and continually upgrade them as needs dictate.

Productivity and Cost Control

One of the greatest challenges manufacturing companies face is “how do I deal with the price reduction requests I get from my customers?” It would seem simple. We have to eat the loss of margin to keep the revenue. Well, you can only do this for so long. Sooner or later you run out of margin and unless you have taken steps to further control cost, you are suddenly in trouble. Once your organization has a firm handle on your real “fully burdened manufacturing cost/hour”, then cost control through productivity improvement is the answer. New equipment, as mentioned earlier, is part of the answer, but real productivity comes when our employees are empowered by understanding the real basis for our cost and the role they play in changing that basis. If your company is not actively involved in a Lean initiative, if you have not established “metrics” that confirm success, and if your company culture is not one of consistently improving performance then daily struggles can become a way of life. Having a thorough understanding of your manufacturing costs, and then implementing a plan to address those areas that need improvement, will go a long way in strengthening profitability.

In summary, our country has always been involved in “making stuff”. Our manufacturing capability is second to none. I realize this as I see companies who have off shored their production only to realize they need to come home. Back to where real efficiency is understood and embraced. Back where “being the best” is not a bad term. And Yes, based on what our economists tell us, we will have ups and downs in our business cycles. But the best deterrent to down business cycles is productivity and the ability to cost your costs to be able to meet changing price demands. Our manufacturing future has always been bright. But now it more important than ever to continue to take those steps that will allow us to continue to be most productive nation in the world.


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Lohre and Associates offers Content Creation services. Though we are specialists in Industrial Marketing, our Cincinnati marketing firm has a broad range of clients.

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Very Fast. Very Light. Very Safe. Very Good.

Fri, Jul 15, 2016 @ 01:02 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Industrial Marketing Content

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Eastern_Sailplane.jpg

May 29, 2016

Dear Chuck,

    With my recent retirement, I have a little more time to reflect and felt the need to send you a “Thank You” letter. You have been doing my marketing/advertising for 15 years now. The type of ads I required were a little out of the ordinary. The combination of art and technology is always hard. For Schleicher sailplanes, First we sold expensive, exclusive recreational dreams, second we sold a level of technical sophistication for our aircraft of which Boeing would be jealous.  Combining the two is a certain balance which you understood right away. You “got it“ very quickly. Thanks. I’ve enjoyed the great ads you have created for us as well as the articles about our principal, Alexander Schleicher Sailplanes. Especially the interview with their new designer, Michael Greiner. Your article was at the start of his career. Then he went went on to create one of the most successful sailplane designs in the history of soaring.

And thanks for talking us into the digital age. Who would have known that our 50 something demographic would enjoy staying in touch on Facebook. Your posts of Schleicher news as well as our articles in SOARING MAGAZINE made for great content that grew our community.

From aerial photography to trade show graphics; ads to social media we’ll miss having fun with marketing. Retirement never comes easy and you hate to see your friends and customers get out of touch. But the soaring community always stays in touch and Linda and I look forward to future adventures with you and Janet.

Now one last plug about that new ASG 29, imagine your life is as long as a yard stick…..

Sincerely,

John Murray

Eastern Sailplane

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Review: "Designing B2B Brands" for industrial marketing communications

Wed, Jul 22, 2015 @ 11:45 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Industrial Branding, Branding and Identity, Construction Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Graphic Design, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertising Literature, Graphic Design Agency, Cincinnati Design, Design Agency, Advertising Agency

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Branding lessons from Deloitte and 195,000 brand managers, by Carlos Martinez Onaindia & Brian Resnick. 

HOW Magazine introduced us to this 2013 book published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., it's about Deloitte's branding and its implementation throughout the organization. We saw an ad on HOW's website.

Carlos Martinez Onaindia & Brian Resnick worked for Deloitte while writing the book.

Hubspot included Deloitte and GE websites in one of its promotional blog posts and we recognize them as a good examples of industrial marketing communications design. It's great news that we can go into more detail with one of our choices.

Designing B2B Brands, Ten Laws resized 600

Number 9. "Always be closing" is close to our heart; it emphasizes the objective of marketing communications. "Every communication should focus on achieving your end goal, and the audience should feel good about, or at least comfortable with, that result," perfectly sums up landing pages and calls-to-action.

Designing B2B Brands, Proposals resized 600

This chart brings to light some of Deloitte's strategies: "2. Understand - Get under the skin of the client and use the opportunity to better Deloitte's comparative competitive position, 4. Interact - Take every opportunity to demonstrate our credentials, improve our understanding and test The Deloitte Difference with the client, 8. Capitalize - Make the most of your investment by debriefing the team and the client, learning from what the client tells us, and developing on ongoing strategy to win work from the client." These strategies can be put to use for industrial equipment selling as well.

Designing B2B Brands, Executive Champions resized 600

This chart illustrates how a company's strategy's affects the message, "Lead by example, as their (executives) decisions have a direct impact on brand legacy and will ripple throughout the organization."

Feintool Achieve More With Less resized 600

Heinz Loosli, CEO of Feintool International Holding discusses the strategic advantage of Feintool in this interview for its customer magazine. In response to a question about the company's recovery from the automotive industry decline in 2009, he answers, "We brought new, innovative products to market, we have played more to our strengths and in doing so achieved some great successes in the market. We have also improved our ability to complete by implementing measures to increase efficiency. It is important to appreciate that it is not a case of one-off actions but ongoing commitment that will ensure our company has a successful future. The motto is: achieve more with less. We are constantly working on this..." This statement reflects both the company's equipment's strategic advantages but also good business practices. Feintool's metal part-making equipment takes plate steel and produces parts that are assembly ready without post machining. Their machines achieve more with less material and processing -- Loosli is using the same analogy for the company's management practises. You can download the entire Feintool magazine here. For the North American edition, Lohre & Associates wrote two articles, edited and printed the publication here in Cincinnati. We are honored to work with Feintool's Cincinnati offices and we feel the company's marketing communications are equal to Deloitte's.

Barry Salzberg's opening message for the book brings to light a similar focus, "There are 195,000 professionals around the world actively shaping the Deloitte identity on a daily basis. Brand-building of that scale requires a relentless focus on a unified vision and shared values, alongside a dynamic culture. There's tremendous opportunity if you get this right."

Heather Hancock, Global Managing Partner, Brand, defines Deloitte's businesss this way: "Deloitte is an advisory business whose brand relies on the daily actions of nearly 200,000 people in more than 150 countries being connected and reflecting the sane core commitments. We connect our people and our brand in myriad ways, always informed by a deep understanding of the marketplace and our clients' needs. And we take the long view, remaining committed to the task at hand whilst building value for our clients and our own firm long into the future. It delivers us client and personal growth, risk insulation and trust."

Designing B2B Brands, Faith The chart on the left gives insight to the reasons an industrial brand is of value: reputation, risk mitigation, client-building, loyalty and pride leads to the correlation between targeted brand investment and growth rate. Deloitte's business is deep market understanding to solve client problems. In a way industrial equipment is the same, the equipment is engineered to be an effective way for a company to be in business. Every company has to continually evolve to meet market changes, employee education and financial obligations. Deloitte is in the business of communication; many businesses are in the business of delivering a product. For a manufacturing company to understand the value of brand, it has to have an extremely clear understanding of the technology, engineering, economics of the market and the future. Every component in a machine tells the history of the company's brand. Someone at every company knows that story and that is where the brand starts.


We'll continue to look for branding examples that manufacturing company's can use to improve their marketing communications. If you get in touch to review your brand, we'll send you the Kindle version of this book. You'll enjoy it!

We can't begin to include all the great graphical information and examples in this review. The book covers every conceivable graphic problem and the solutions, meant more for the marketing communications manager of a company than the chief executives. In this review we wanted to climb to the 10,000-foot view of branding that often gets lost when you're manufacturing industrial equipment. But it does apply and Deloitte does a great job.

Hopefully GE will come out with a similar edition, they are in the machinery business! Writing those specifications and creating 3 views to make the brand come alive is what we do every day.

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