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Free Stock Photography for Industrial Advertising Marketing

Sun, Dec 18, 2016 @ 09:11 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency, american dream composite index, growth driven design, Industrial Advertising Tracking

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As much as we would always like to have the perfect photograph to accompany your industrial advertising, many times the budget, time and models aren't available.

Here's a list of several services that you can obtain rights free images for your industrial marketing advertising.

Let's pretend we are looking for a photo of a crane cab or construction executives on a job site.

Death to the Stock Photo

"We're Death to the Stock Photo. A photo & inspiration haven for creatives crushing their path. From their license, "Under the license, you may display a DTTSP photo as you please, reproduce it, add it to a collection, and make adaptations of it. However, you may not distribute the photo—so don’t include it in any photo packs or give it out for others to use. That’s how we are able to run our business :). Displaying and reproducing the photo on physical or digital products that you distribute is fine." We signed up for the weekly pack and will see how it goes. We didn't find any construction shots. This was a nice image.

CyclinginMoab5inch.jpg


Unsplash

"All photos published on Unsplash are licensed under Creative Commons Zero which means you can copy, modify, distribute and use the photos for free, including commercial purposes, without asking permission from or providing attribution to the photographer or Unsplash." Here are a few interesting shots. Click on the image to go to the download page.

io7dx_1efcg-ant-rozetsky-5inch.jpg

uuw4psob388-david-siglin-5inch.jpg

Free Stock Photos

"To the extent possible under law, HubSpot has waived all copyright and related or neighboring rights to Free Stock Photos. This work is published from: United States." Go to the bottom of the page and click on tags. It will bring up the page with all the categories. This was the only image that came up when I searched on "construction."

sailboat-in-charles-river-with-buildings-5inch.jpg

Pexels

"Legal Simplicity - All photos on Pexels are free for any personal and commercial purpose." Here's a crane shot we found. And another construction photo.

crane-load-crane-skyward-in-the-height-48122-5inch.jpg

silhouettes-people-worker-dusk-40723-5inch.jpg

iStock

As you can see none of these free images were exactly what we were looking for. In that case we recommend iStock, "iStock by Getty Images is one of the world's leading stock content marketplaces, offering millions of hand-picked premium images at ridiculously low prices that you can only get from us." We purchased the following image for only $11. If you're writing an online blog, you can get by with the smallest size image. They cost more the larger you get. The second image would be $33, we didn't purchase that one. You can tell by the watermark.

Industrial-advertising-stock photo-5.jpg

Industrial-advertising-stock photo-4.jpg

Good luck with your searches and always be sure you follow the rules of use.


 (If you liked this post you might like these tips to take your own photography "Photography Design.")


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Put Eight Industrial Advertising Tracking Tips to Work in Print

Fri, Dec 09, 2016 @ 12:14 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency, american dream composite index, growth driven design, Industrial Advertising Tracking

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(This weeks post is comes via Jim Beckwith, Sales Representative with Metalcasting Design &amp; Purchasing. Jim is a seasoned professional that knows how industrial marketing works and what works. Thanks Jim for passsing on Ryan Dohrn's thoughts.)

Industrial-Advertising-Tracking.jpg"Common knowledge" these days is that print advertising can't be tracked, which in theory makes print inferior to digital advertising options. However, noted marketing and communications expert Ryan Dohrn recently shared several ways you can quantify the results of your print advertising.

1. The person that answers the phone at your office is NOT the best person to track your print ad response. "64% of incoming calls, tracked over a four month print ad campaign, resulted in no question being asked about the advertising source. - BSM, research study, 2014


2. Use a unique website address (called a "vanity URL") in each different print ad. For example, if JohnDoe.com is your main web site, go to GoDaddy.com and register another dot com name like JohnDoeCastings.com to run in print ad #1, and GoJohnDoe.com to run in print ad #2. After you register your vanity URL, you will need to follow some very specific instructions posted in the full version of this blog at http://www.afsinc.org//MCDP/VanityURLSetup

3. DO NOT use an extension on a dot com name such as JohnDoe.com/BlueMag. This will fail almost every time!


4. Use a unique tracking phone number in each ad. Sure, phone volume is down these days, but tracking your calls from print ads is easy. Companies like CallRail.com can offer you this service for as low as $30 per month. Or, a cheaper route is to buy a TracPhone from Walmart or a similar "burner" type phone. If you truly want to know who is calling from your print ad, put your cell number in the ad.


5. Track your Google analytics. Everything a user does is tracked, but most business owners just do not fully understand how to read their Google analytics. Other than Google, traditional media like print is the second best way to drive traffic to your web site. Be sure to track when your print campaign started and ended in Google Analytics. You will almost always see a lift in website traffic during a print campaign. Be sure to filter out all the other things you are doing online to see the best result.


6. Run unique content in each ad. Ad agencies are notorious for running the exact same ad in multiple magazines. Do not do this. Feature different content in each print ad to better gauge results. It can be as simple as changing the color of the product you feature or the image in the ad.


7. Spend time checking your marketing results. It is imperative. Ask your media sales rep for help. It's your money... track it.


8. Try QR codes. While they're not the miracle some expected them to be, they can work if used properly. Feature a unique offer to readers willing to scan the QR code that is pointed to a unique landing page or offer on your website. Free QR code: http://www.qr-code-generator.com

Which of these industrial advertising tracking tips would work best for you? Give them a try and find out! Above all, share your results with your media reps - it tells us how well we're doing our jobs and lets us know if something needs to be changed.

(If you liked this post you might like "Great Industrial Marketing Ads."


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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Cincinnati Hubspotter's Meetup - Growth driven design

Fri, Dec 02, 2016 @ 03:42 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency, american dream composite index, growth driven design

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Growth driven design is a "build it fast and fix it fast" goal focused web site building method.

Growth-Driven-design.jpg

Hubspot is the perfect platform to create Growth Driven Sites.

We attended the Cincinnati Hubspotter's Meetup today for soup and a presentation by Cleriti on Growth Driven Design. We've attended many lectures and webinars on the subject so here are the highlights.

Pick the minimum number of goals, create calls to action, landing pages, content and launch. Get feedback, adjust and measure again. Repeat.

Continuous improvement:
Audience
Value
Usability
Conversion rate optimization
Stickiness
Personalization
Assets
Promoters

Analytic tools:
"Hotjar" is a heat map of your site that will tell you were your vistitors are getting hung up.
"UserTesting" is a service that asks your demographics to give you feedback

Methodology narrative example:
For this "persona" visiting the "homepage", we believe changing the "graphic" into an "interactive & linked graphic" will increase "conversions" because of "these analytics"

 

(If you liked this post you might like "Do you care more for your audience than SEO?"


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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October 2016 American Dream Composite Index Report

Fri, Nov 25, 2016 @ 11:08 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency, american dream composite index

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(Lohre & Associates and O'Keeffe Public Relations helped launch the American Dream Composite Index and are happy to repost their reports here every chance we get. This index is exactly what it says it is, a measure of the degree that Americans think they have achieved the American Dream. Enjoy.)

What is the ADCI?

The American Dream Composite Index™ (ADCI) is a unique and robust measure of American sentiment that values the American Dream on a monthly basis. 

The notion of the American Dream encompasses our behaviors, attitudes and satisfaction with economic conditions, personal well-being, societal and political institutions, cultural diversity, and the physical environment. 

The ADCI reveals what people living in the United States do, strive for, work for, wish for, and ultimately, hope for as they assume multiple roles, including but not limited to, consumers, parents, children, students, employees, employers, parishioners, voters, etc.

American-Dream-Composite-Index-Oct-2016.png

Composite Index
Is 65.54, up .23% from September. This is a small change driven by small changes to the sub-indices. The economic, well-being and environmental sub-indices are all up in October, the societal index is down, and the diversity index is flat.

Economic Index
Increased slightly to 64.49 in October, a .38% change compared to September. This increase is a result of increases to the dimensions of Job Environment, Job Benefits, Freedom of Choice and Destinations in Life. Home ownership had a significant decline in October and other constructs for the ADEI are mostly unchanged.

Well Being Index
Increased slightly to 70.77, a .49% change from September. This small increase is primarily the result of increases to the dimensions of Happiness, Leisure Activities, and the Support of Someone Special.

Societal Index
Decreased to 54.36, a change of .30% from September. This change is the result of decreases across the board in the ADSI, but primarily Trust in Business and Trust in Government. Safety in the Community is the only dimension to have a significant increase in October after the significant lows we observed for this dimension in September.

Diversity Index
Is mostly unchanged in October, changing only slightly up .13% from September to 73.86. Even though the ADDI is unchanged in October, the dimension of Melting Pot—Diversity is down slightly and Political Freedom is up slightly.

Environmental Index
Is up very slightly by .4% in October to 69.46.

Extra Insites from the October Index
This month, we asked a few extra questions with the ADCI survey related to the current political election season. A few insights are:

  • 25% of millennial respondents say they get their political news primarily from social media compared to 16% for all other generations.
  • Over half of all survey takers say the person they would like to vote for is not running in the current election. This sentiment is most shared by those reporting to be of a conservative or moderate political identity. Only 40% of liberals said the same.
  • In spite of so many people saying they are unsatisfied by the current presidential offerings, 75% of all respondents say this is the most important presidential election of their lifetime.
  • ADCI scores for those of moderate or conservative ideology are 2 points higher on average compared to those of liberals.

(If you liked this post you might likeRobots, Cobots & the American Dream - Metalworking Equipment Marketing Ripe for Inbound)

.

 


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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17 Years Ago My Father Died. He Taught Me Industrial Marketing.

Wed, Nov 23, 2016 @ 01:00 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Marketing, Marketing Automation, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency

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wo 

Thomas-G-Lohre-Sr.jpgThe 1980 version,
"Lohre & Associates is a full-service ad agency, a member of the Four-A's, a long-established business, in continuous operation in Cincinnati for more than 40 years. We serve a variety of clients in the tri-state, some for as long as 25 years. We have a seasoned professional crew that knows the ropes in creating all kinds of selling communications, for highly technical industries, heavy capital equipment, or consumer goods marketing. Don't miss the boat! If you're looking for smoother sailing in your important selling as you chart your company's course for the 1980's, call Lohre & Associates now."

LEED Platinum Plaque.jpg

The 2016 version,
"Lohre & Associates is a full-service ad agency, a member of the U.S. Green Building Council, a long-established business, in continuous operation in Cincinnati for more than 80 years. We serve a variety of clients worldwide, some for as long as 55 years. We have a seasoned professional crew that knows the brick and mortar in creating all kinds of selling communications, for highly technical industries, heavy capital equipment, or sustainable building materials. Don't miss your grand entrance! If you're looking for an easy build in your important selling as you plan your company's growth for the 2010's, call Lohre & Associates now."

My LinkedIn Profile,
"I started work as a graphic artist at my father's (Thomas G. Lohre, Sr.) industrial marketing ad agency, Lohre & Associates, in 1977. We specialize in machine tools, mining and processing equipment. The agency grew in the 90s and survived the 2000s. Our latest initiative has been in the sustainable building materials and services industries. Janet's and my purchase of a Frank Lloyd Wright designed home in 2003 rekindled my interest in architecture. I have followed the U.S. Green Building Council's education path to learn how to serve this industry. We founded Green Cincinnati Education Advocacy in 2009 and self documented our office LEED Platinum in 2011. As a Green Building consultancy, we certified GreenSource Cincinnati's office LEED Platinum in 2013. In 2012, Lohre & Assoc. became a Hubspot Partner to offer best practices in internet marketing."


Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates
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Great Test-Pectations - Mining Equipment Marketing

Fri, Aug 05, 2016 @ 02:37 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Advertising, Content Creation, Content Marketing

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(This week's post is a recent article we wrote for POWDER BULK SOLIDS on a major factor in mining equipment marketing - trying before you buy! Thanks to Stedman Machine Company for the opportunity to work with them to create one of the finest marketing programs I've been a part of in my nearly 40 years in the business. Lohre also took the photos.)

Learn why it’s smart to try before you buy size reduction equipment.

By Chris Nawalaniec, Vice President of Sales & Marketing, Stedman Machine Company

Why Test?

Selecting the right equipment is also a great way to save energy. Sure you could use a carpenter’s hammer to drive a railroad spike, but it is not very efficient, and while a sledgehammer is more common, an automatic spike driver can make the task nearly effortless. However if you are only driving a single spike, the additional energy required using the automatic option becomes cost prohibitive. A review of your material and process by the equipment manufacturer can help you avoid the pitfalls of under or over selection.

Mining-Equipment-Marketing-8-5-16.3.jpg(Stedman Machine Company photo of closed size reduction circuit system with the Stedman Grand Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactor and a round vibratory screener.)

Testing helps determine the most efficient processing technology to meet production needs. The right equipment saves time and money in the long run. Full-scale testing provides precise size reduction solutions for the exact material/s and demonstration of a specific model before purchase.

While the nuances of size reduction are infinite, commonly encountered industrial size reduction applications use equipment that achieves reduction through one or more of the following:

  • Impact -- hitting a friable material to break large parts into smaller ones
  • Shear -- tearing or ripping material
  • Compression -- squeezing and pressing down on a material until it breaks.

Design parameters that drive size reduction crusher selection include production requirements, material characteristics, project location, climate conditions, capital cost, safety and environment, the life of product/expansion plans and maintenance requirements.

Some types of machinery can last decades. Buying the wrong equipment can have long-term consequences in the cost of consumables, lack of production and downtime. Yearly consumables alone could exceed half the cost of the unit. Size- reduction equipment is typically integrated into a large system. By choosing the wrong equipment, it could inadvertently create a bottleneck that affects the productivity of the overall system.

Test facilities have hundreds of reports on file that may match your application. Saving the expenses of preliminary testing or in the selection of the proper size reduction method. Frequently the staff has experience crushing your material or a similar material. New applications are compared to existing reference data for similar applications. Past tests provide valuable insight into how to configure equipment and plan tests.

Picking the right test facility

Simple devices like the mortar and pestle and technologically complex machines like giant mining crushers perform the same basic task: making big things smaller. Finding the right equipment for this critical process step should begin with the question, “Do we need size reduction equipment, knowledge, or both?”

Choose a test facility that has a range of different size reduction methods. A full complement of hoppers, mechanical conveyors and screens enable test plant technicians to replicate both open and closed systems. Full-size crushing equipment is best for dependable results. It is difficult to scale up crushing results from a lab-size crusher. Lab machine tests may not determine the actual horsepower and machine size the project requires. 

Is the test plant set up to provide real-world conditions in which customers can view their materials being processed -- from feeding, through size reduction and discharge/separation? Does it have an open slot to allow for the installation of other machines on an as-needed basis? Are there cameras to provide live video feeds of materials as they are being processed?

Once the testing is done, toll processing, in the same facility, can produce enough product to test downstream processes, such as briquetting and extrusion, in the future facility to ensure that the process will perform as expected. Remember, the goal is to find an application solution rather than simply buying equipment.

Mining-Equipment-Marketing-8-5-16.1.jpg(Stedman Machine Company photo of open size reduction circuit system with the Stedman Grand Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactor and a round vibratory screener.)

What the test plant needs to know

Size reduction process design begins with an understanding of the feed’s physical and chemical characteristics and ends with the product’s physical specifications and other unique product considerations. Five things are needed to evaluate testing possibilities:

  • Feed size
  • Moisture content
  • Tons-per-hour capacity required
  • Final product size
  • Safety data sheets

A material with high moisture content may become gummy and build up on the inside of the crusher. Moisture has a cushioning effect and can cause the material to stick together reducing productivity. When material buildup is a concern, the addition of equipment heaters and air cannons can be used to reduce build up allowing for more efficient operation. Brittle materials are easily crushed, but the process may create too many fines. Heat-sensitive materials may need cooling systems. 

Getting the material to the test facility may be a problem. Can the consistency of the material change during shipping to the test plant? Can the facility restore your material to its as-shipped condition? For typical tests about 200 to 500 pounds of material are required.

What to expect during the test

First steps are sampling of the raw feed to establish the input gradation, moisture level and creating a plan for crushing tests specific to the project goals. To achieve the desired particle size and consistency, the test facility will consider: particle size distribution (the percentage of lumps versus fines) as it enters the crusher, feed control (Will it become gummy or sticky?) and how material is taken away from the crusher. If the material has a large percentage of fines, it’s more efficient to separate the fines with a screener first. Only the oversized material goes through the crusher.

Plan to spend a few days observing the testing process and all the procedures necessary to produce the required end product including preparation, loading of your material and RPM sets for fine to coarse production. You’ll witness the real-time horsepower consumption through start up and full load.

Test plants are operated in either open or closed circuit. Open circuit means the material passes through the crusher once. Closed circuit means that material is re-circulated back into the crusher if it doesn’t pass through a certain screen mesh. In closed circuits, as much as 30 percent of material may re-circulate before meeting size requirements, which increases energy use by 30 percent.

If needed, the test facility will run your material through various crushing methods and/or determine how to fine tune the crusher’s configuration for your process. Two different type crushers may effectively reduce your material at the specifications you need, but one may require much less horsepower and less cost to operate.

Mining Equipment Toll Processing(Stedman Machine Company photo provided of closed, air-swept size reduction circuit system with a Stedman Vertical Roller Mill.)

The report

The data produced from the test of your material helps estimate operating costs from power consumption to wear parts and the information needed to select the right crushing and size reduction equipment. The written technical report provided to you will include the following:

  • Raw feed particle size distribution
  • Moisture content analysis
  • Product particle size distribution gradation analysis
  • Bulk density analysis before and after crushing
  • Abrasion Test to determine if an impactor is feasible for a particular application and to estimate hammer wear life.
  • Power requirements for startup and operation

Evaluating results and scale up

Performance data obtained on test plant equipment are scalable to accurately predict outcomes achieved on production models. Once your tests are done, the sales engineer will make recommendations for equipment type and size, open or closed circuits and other equipment like air cannons or heaters to loosen caking or sticky material. The equipment selected should produce the same particle size distribution as the test unit and the energy required at the production throughput rate is scalable from the test equipment.

Size reduction expressed in the simplest form is: “Material + Energy = Size Reduction.” Experienced, knowledgeable size reduction equipment suppliers will guide a customer through the correct questions and recommend the best-suited method for any specific materials. Reputable suppliers will refer customers to other equipment manufacturers with better-suited styles of equipment when their products are not suited to the application.

In conclusion, following these simple steps when and where you define your product and process, perform testing and consider your installation, you will succeed in buying a crusher that will provide years of trouble-free processing.

Stedman Machine Company, 129 Franklin Street, Aurora, IN 4001, 812-926-0038; www.stedman-machine.com, sales@stedman-machine.com 

About the author

Chris Nawalaniec is Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Stedman Machine Company, the Aurora, Ind.-based manufacturer of size reduction equipment and systems, founded in 1834. Nawalaniec graduated from the University of Cincinnati (BSME, MBA) and has more than 30 years professional experience in size reduction and particle size separation. Nawalaniec oversees new machinery and system sales, as well as the full-service test plant that has been operating at Stedman for more than 90 years. (Read Chris' mining equipment marketing testimonial.)

About Stedman Machine Company

Stedman Machine Company works closely with its customers to determine the best, most cost-effective, efficient size reduction method and equipment for specific applications. Stedman’s line of equipment includes: Cage Mills, Grand Slam™ and Mega Slam™ Horizontal Shaft Impactors, V-Slam™ Vertical Shaft Impactors, Hammer Mills, Aurora Lump Breakers, Micro-Max™ and Vertical Roller Mill Air Swept Fine Grinders. Stedman operates a complete testing and toll processing facility staffed by experienced technicians with full-scale equipment, allowing customers to witness accurate crushing test results, predicted output capacities and processing data. Support services include system design and 24-hour parts and service


Cincinnati's Full-service Industrial Advertising Agency

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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Industrial Social Media for Quarries

Fri, Jul 29, 2016 @ 04:13 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content

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 (Thanks to Trevor Hall, Founder, Clear Creek Digital, for this great article in the July/August 2016 STONE SAND & GRAVEL REVIEW. We thought it was just going to be another marketer that was selling industrial social media to accounts that didn't use it industrially themselves let alone actually have experience working in a quarry, but Trevor is the real deal and has some good tips for quarries to improve their community relations.)


Social Media Can Help Improve an Operation

industrial-social-media.jpgOUR ONLINE NEWS FEEDS and social media accounts are more and more filled with websites and articles with catchy titles like "Top 5 Amazing Survivor Stories," "10 Apps for your iPhone," "8 Rocks That Look Like Celebrities." We all, myself included, get caught wanting to know more about these headlines. Many times we click and visit the information.

Called "listicles," these articles blend a list with short articles, and there are lessons to be learned from them. People read them because they appear - and typically are - quick to read, have an enthusiastic tone and spur creative disruption in our own minds. Most importantly, though, they grab our attention.

Everyone online is hammered with copious amounts of information every second of the day. Figuring out how to grab people's attention, even just for a few seconds, is a very challenging task. What is most daunting, espe­cially for quarries, is understanding how to communicate a very complex process like aggregates production with many different internal func­tions and processes in a quick, eye­catching and engaging message.

Finding ways to incorporate the kind of content that catches the eye of our industry and our communities, including residents near stone, sand and gravel operations, is a vital part of any community relations plan.

Know the Social Networks

Social networks like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube pro­vide new tools for aggregates opera­tions to tell their story.

Twitter: Posts are 140 characters or less, so it's important to link back to blogs or information on a different website.

Facebook: Users can share photos, videos and updates about a quarry or company with a "page" that is dedi­cated to that company or operation.

LinkedIn: A professional social network where users post their work experience and look for jobs. Companies also create pages on LinkedIn to share content.

YouTube: Users can share and com­ment on videos, which is one of the most popular and engaging forms of media today. These digital tools can/enhance a company's ability to engage neighbors, lawmakers and regulators. Also, these networks can be used to inform a pub­lic of something they may not know much about, including quarrying.

Online media's reach is huge and increasing. A majority of the global population is on some type of social network. With the growth of mobile technologies reaching even to rural Africa, many more people are likely to join. Further, the data shows that online social dialogues and infor­mation sharing are not just for a younger crowd anymore. Social media users 65 years of age and older have more than tripled in the past five years.

Recognize and Use Social Media Trends

It is vital that aggregates opera­tions recognize the trends of the online audience and appreciate its huge and growing size. Notice, I did not suggest that companies become "masters" of digital marketing. But recognition of best digital commu­nication trends can lead you on a wonderful path to exploring how to tell the story of your operation or your products.

Online and mobile video will also play an important role for every busi­ness and operation. It is predicted that by 2020, 80 percent of people will rely on video content to form opinions and/or support for busi­nesses and organizations. Aggregates producers are not exempt from this trend, and can enhance traditional community outreach with videos and photos.

Print publications or text on a screen can be enhanced with multi­media content that is easy to share with people who both support or are critical of a quarry.

Short and Shareable is the Way to Go

Try to grab attention of an online audience by using powerful and quick information. This is especially true for social media networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram because they rely on images and photos in addition to text.

Photos and video play crucial roles in grabbing the attention of view­ers. The more engaging your con­tent is, the more likely you are to see an increase in viewers. YouTube, the popular video-sharing site, is the second largest social network­ing site behind Facebook. More people are turning to YouTube to share and gather information than ever before.

For example, every day people are watching YouTube to learn how gran­ite is quarried and crushed, and there are videos with thousands of views on how limestone is produced.

Stone, sand and gravel companies can connect the value of their opera­tions to the personal benefit of the reader and their community. Right now, there aren't many aggregates producers in the United States fully utilizing social and digital media to share company information. So there is a great opportunity for companies and quarries to produce quality and positive content about the industry.

Using Social Media to Build a Brand

In print and online communica­tions, the words we use matter a lot. The recent presidential campaign has shown how audiences react to words used in tweets and images shared on Facebook.

Some people on social networks may negatively respond to a com­pany's content, regardless of how informative and engaging posts may be. One of the best ways to safeguard one's messaging from these tribula­tions is to make your content fun. Allow your organization to pull the curtains back a bit and show the human and humanitarian aspects of your company. It is harder for posi­tive and educational content to be perceived as anything but, and using facts and information is also a great way to address negative comments you may receive.

Staying positive, engaging and edu­cational is a great way to highlight employees, the communities you work with and the dynamic ways that rocks are quarried and crushed and shipped to customers. After all, the adventures of quar­rying are wonderful stories. It's up to you to share them. •

Trevor Hall is the founder of Clear Creek Digital, LLC, a digital communications and marketing firm focused on provid­ing those resources to mining and engi­neering organizations. Visit his website at www.clearcreekdigital.com.


(Thanks Trevor, Having a high performance site is the number one industrial marketing challenge, get it right and your industrial social media will pay off big.)


Cincinnati's Full-service Industrial Advertising Agency

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

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12 Questions Every Manufacturer Should Ask Themselves

Wed, Jul 20, 2016 @ 11:12 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Process Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content

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 (Thanks to Ken Maisch for this great article in the July 15, 2016 Cincinnati Business Courier. If you don't know the competition and the marketplace, you won't be able to grow your business.)

Ken_Maisch.jpgRecently I attended an economic briefing session to get some insight into where the economists saw us heading over a period of time. After the meeting, while I was reviewing the data we received, I began to think about TechSolve’s client companies and how they were preparing for changes in their customer’s needs, based on changing economics, and how they were and should be planning for future changes.

Over the last year, I have seen the business of some of my clients slow as much as 30%. On the other hand, I saw some of those client companies serving, growing, and thriving markets. I asked myself how each of these client groups was dealing with their particular circumstance. Our experience shows that client companies in a rapid growth mode are usually behind the curve and have to take exceptional steps to deal with this growth. It also shows that companies who see a drop in business usually go into a full blown pull back, as if their future will never be there again.

There will always be changes in our business cycles. There will always be new products and there will always be products that become obsolete. The “key” to sustaining a viable manufacturing company is based on its ability to deal with these changing environments. How nimble these companies are in changing times determines their overall ability to grow and continue a pattern of profitability.

There are twelve questions manufacturing companies should constantly ask themselves as they examine the future. Those are:

1) Are we intimately familiar with the market we serve?

2) How well do we know our competition?

3) What are the changing aspects of that market?

4) Is there a consolidation of players within that market?

5) How much of our overall revenue is represented by our top five customers?

6) Are we getting downward pricing pressure from that customer base?

7) Do we see increasing raw material costs?

8) Are we experiencing annual increases in our manufacturing costs that we can’t pass on to our customer base?

9) Are we consistently upgrading our equipment to maintain productivity?

10) Is “lean” thinking a part of our company culture?

11) Are we having difficulty in finding and keeping capable workers?

12) Is “productivity improvement” a part of our overall plan?

If you don’t know the answers to a majority of these questions I believe you will find life in a manufacturing environment to be difficult at best. Let’s take these questions and boil them down into three groups.

1) Market knowledge and marketing capability

2) Equipment capability and utilization

3) Productivity and cost control

Now let’s take a look at each area as they pertain to today’s manufacturing environment.

Market Knowledge and Marketing Capability

A thorough knowledge of your targeted market is essential. Knowing all the players, the competitive pricing levels each offers, and at what level you are competitive within this market enables more accurate quotations leading to a higher hit rate. We find this an area of weakness within some of our client base. Some know the names of primary competition, but aren’t sure at what level their pricing must be to earn new business. In the absence of this knowledge, companies price their products on what they perceive are the prices their competitors charge without a relationship between their real costs and the profit margins available at that level of pricing.

In addition to these pricing issues, it is imperative that companies understand the best way to address their target market. What is the best way to attract new customers? Is the internet and other electronic media the best way to find and get new customers? Is a more traditional sales approach preferable? Is direct customer contact better than a less direct approach. Does your product have an engineering or sales element? In all cases it is a must that you understand the “who” within your market. It is important to know who is the sales leader within your market, who is the “price” leader within your market, and which competitor has the strongest reputation and the “why” that is. Simply selecting a market in the absence of this knowledge can be a recipe for disaster. Growth in a new market or customer base can be much more successful if the answers to these questions are understood and addressed in the early planning stages.

Equipment Capability and Utilization

Businesses evolve and change over time. When manufacturing companies begin they usually locate and use the most economical equipment they can afford. Not always the most productive, but it gets the job done. Then over time they begin to invest in new technology and equipment that offers significant productivity advantages. They realize this is the long term answer to better controlling their costs. If new equipment is good, more must be better. Not always the correct solution. It is imperative that this new more productive equipment reach full utilization as quickly as possible. Otherwise the cost of having that equipment becomes a draw against profitability as our employees scramble to get it fully utilized and still keep the old equipment running.

New technology is only an advantage when it increases capacity and lowers cost. Owning and underutilizing the newest equipment will only increase cost, not improve the situation. As a process improvement company we understand and agree with consistently improving productivity, and when equipment is the answer, do the necessary economic justification and purchase the new equipment. Making sure that you understand your productivity levels and how it relates to your overall cost, is a must. And once you understand the importance of long term productivity improvements, budget to upgrade your equipment as your depreciation schedule dictates. The most productive companies we serve are those that justify and utilize the most efficient systems available and continually upgrade them as needs dictate.

Productivity and Cost Control

One of the greatest challenges manufacturing companies face is “how do I deal with the price reduction requests I get from my customers?” It would seem simple. We have to eat the loss of margin to keep the revenue. Well, you can only do this for so long. Sooner or later you run out of margin and unless you have taken steps to further control cost, you are suddenly in trouble. Once your organization has a firm handle on your real “fully burdened manufacturing cost/hour”, then cost control through productivity improvement is the answer. New equipment, as mentioned earlier, is part of the answer, but real productivity comes when our employees are empowered by understanding the real basis for our cost and the role they play in changing that basis. If your company is not actively involved in a Lean initiative, if you have not established “metrics” that confirm success, and if your company culture is not one of consistently improving performance then daily struggles can become a way of life. Having a thorough understanding of your manufacturing costs, and then implementing a plan to address those areas that need improvement, will go a long way in strengthening profitability.

In summary, our country has always been involved in “making stuff”. Our manufacturing capability is second to none. I realize this as I see companies who have off shored their production only to realize they need to come home. Back to where real efficiency is understood and embraced. Back where “being the best” is not a bad term. And Yes, based on what our economists tell us, we will have ups and downs in our business cycles. But the best deterrent to down business cycles is productivity and the ability to cost your costs to be able to meet changing price demands. Our manufacturing future has always been bright. But now it more important than ever to continue to take those steps that will allow us to continue to be most productive nation in the world.


Cincinnati's Full-service Industrial Advertising Agency

Strategic Marketing Communications for Web.

Lohre and Associates offers Content Creation services. Though we are specialists in Industrial Marketing, our Cincinnati marketing firm has a broad range of clients.

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Very Fast. Very Light. Very Safe. Very Good.

Fri, Jul 15, 2016 @ 01:02 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Branding, Industrial Marketing Content

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Eastern_Sailplane.jpg

May 29, 2016

Dear Chuck,

    With my recent retirement, I have a little more time to reflect and felt the need to send you a “Thank You” letter. You have been doing my marketing/advertising for 15 years now. The type of ads I required were a little out of the ordinary. The combination of art and technology is always hard. For Schleicher sailplanes, First we sold expensive, exclusive recreational dreams, second we sold a level of technical sophistication for our aircraft of which Boeing would be jealous.  Combining the two is a certain balance which you understood right away. You “got it“ very quickly. Thanks. I’ve enjoyed the great ads you have created for us as well as the articles about our principal, Alexander Schleicher Sailplanes. Especially the interview with their new designer, Michael Greiner. Your article was at the start of his career. Then he went went on to create one of the most successful sailplane designs in the history of soaring.

And thanks for talking us into the digital age. Who would have known that our 50 something demographic would enjoy staying in touch on Facebook. Your posts of Schleicher news as well as our articles in SOARING MAGAZINE made for great content that grew our community.

From aerial photography to trade show graphics; ads to social media we’ll miss having fun with marketing. Retirement never comes easy and you hate to see your friends and customers get out of touch. But the soaring community always stays in touch and Linda and I look forward to future adventures with you and Janet.

Now one last plug about that new ASG 29, imagine your life is as long as a yard stick…..

Sincerely,

John Murray

Eastern Sailplane

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"Disrupted," Book Review - If industrial marketing was easy, everyone would be doing it.

Tue, May 31, 2016 @ 09:50 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Inbound Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, marketing agency, Industrial Marketing Agency, Advertising Agency

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Disrupted Book Cover DesignHey, Dan Lyons, you don't know what you are talking about. I'm talking about marketing, but he's talking about tech start-ups and mid-life displacement. His book "Disrupted -- My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble," was released in April. Lyons' memoir traces his career -- he's a journalist with deep roots in the tech industry-- through being hired by a Boston area-based marketing software company start-up. But don't read Disrupted if you want to learn about Internet marketing.

Three years ago a prospect asked me to find a web site program that integrated a customer relationship management program with an easy-to-use content management system. After some research into WordPress, Eloqua, Marketo and Pardot; I pitched HubSpot (the company Lyons joined as a Marketing Fellow). I found the WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) editing screens were easy and the price was right for what the prospect wanted. Never got the job with the pharmaceutical machinery company but signed the agency up for Hubspot and became a Partner.

From reading his book, Lyons hasn't described the basics of marketing. Know you audience, get to know their pain and offer solutions that move them to your solution. After nearly 40 years in the industrial marketing world, that method is similar to Dale Carnegie, Sandler Sales System and what I learned of P&G's marketing methods from coming across their educational tools to marketers. "Know your audience, where they are in their purchasing process" and create marketing materials that move them toward your solution. Sure Hubspot Culture (which we adopted with a grain of orange salt) fits the start-up culture Lyons describes but I always looked at them as offering good tools to measure and accomplish marketing goals.

Probably the most eye-opening thing I learned was HubSpot's call center. The whole idea of Inbound Marketing is to get away from call centers, but at least it's a warm call center and HubSpot is designed to create a pool of candidates that will finally need a call to move the needle.

But then his book returns to employee hijinks. Halloween Parties? Dan, everyone has dressed up for Halloween at their companies to one extent or another. I think you would be better off writing about accounting procedures rather than marketing. Marketing isn't a science. It's a bit of personality, a bit of application knowledge and a ton of perseverance. You have to contact prospects almost ten times to get the opportunity to make a sale. In the industrial world, you make friends for life because just like pollution, "Nothing Goes Away." The industrial marketing world is made up of hard working engineers that care about their customers and stick around. So my company isn't like Hubspot, but their software will teach you how to leverage the internet to market an industrial product.

Chuck Lohre, of Cincinnati Advertising, Branding, and Marketing Agency, Lohre & Associates inc.The really great thing about HubSpot is its educational track. They provide very detailed and expertly written videos to learn and a good test to take. I've gone through to "Partner" status and our programmer has accomplished the "Design" level. It's been hard to get our interns and even others on staff and associates to take the "Inbound" test so we all get-together and take their test together. It's fun; we re-enforce the methodology and the candidate get their badge. I wish you would have reported just a little bit about the history of industrial marketing, the perfect match for HubSpot, it started with the industrial revolution patent models and now has morphed into YouTube videos and webinars.

Back in 2013, internet marketing was starting to overwhelm me and I was lost as to how to advise my clients. When I learned about HubSpot and how to break down the sales education process into specific steps I could understand and had the software tools to implement; I was relieved. Now there is no internet marketing problem that I can't diagnose and solve. Hubspot gives you all the tools, white papers, spread sheets and calculators to take any good product from zero to 60 overnight. And to upgrade your website. Don't reinvent your website, fix the problems and measure results. Are committee meetings and irrelevant parties in your company throwing wrenches into you site redesign process? Try HubSpot's' "Growth Driven" site re-creation template. But be prepared to lock upper management, sales, marketing, and manufacturing in a room for a few days. Hubspot has the finest marketing education materials I have ever seen. The problem they face now is how to make it fun. Real learning, means turning the tv off, unplugging the phone and studying. "Inbound," HubSpot's annual conference puts a fun spin on the hard work of marketing. There's nothing wrong with that. I'm looking forward to seeing in person my teachers and counselors. They are my "Peeps." And I'm a 60 something, enjoying learning from kids that could be my children.

"Disrupted" is a good read and history of tech start-ups and the new business of selling a mysterious "Secret Sauce" from a company that loses money. To me, Google is the only one pulling it off. Its model is to create a search engine, sell ads on it, and give advertisers the tools to measure it. It's the fox guarding the hen house. We spend thousands of dollars per month on internet advertising. Very hard to measure success and very easy to lose thousands, instantly. Google sells me ads for chemical processing equipment and their measurement tools tell me that girls 18-24 in southern California are the majority of the folks that click on a machine that, "processes three cubic meters of material in an hour." That's the text of the ad! LinkedIn at least allows me only to advertise to specific companies or job titles. For that chemical processing equipment, they are only 13,000 appropriate titles worldwide. I only get chemical and mechanical engineers to join my LinkedIn Group from our advertising. I hope LinkedIn does make some money for their investors soon, but it doesn't matter to me. The "Emperor's New Clothes" have been the latest fashion for as long as an invisible thread has been sold.

Internet Marketing Graphic on Lead ForensicsI enjoyed the chapter on Salesforce, everything about the excess and nothing about the reason the software has such possibilities. Next week I'll be looking over a demo of LEADForensics. A program that mashes up your visitors Internet Provider (IP) address and the people that work at the company. Like Salesforce, this only works well if the company you are trying to sell to has their own IP address. The people that work there come from an open source, voluntary database that is maintained by users. I've used it since it was Jigsaw and is now owned by SalesForce. The possible power of all this is that you will be able to see who is visiting your site and what they are looking at. Normally you can only do this with HubSpot, and the other providers, because the visitor has given you their email address. But the time is coming, because of increased computing power and the cloud, that you will be able to know who is looking at your website without their giving you that information. Call it artificial intelligence or just guessing; it's coming. But I'm not convinced that I'll be persuaded next week because the engineers that are the salespersons for the companies I work for don't have time to chase luke warm artificial intelligence leads. Which brings up another problem inbound marketing has to solve, the buyer persona of one. When you are selling a quarter of a million dollar piece of equipment which includes a lifetime of service and maintenance, AI's not up to it yet. But it's coming!

Oh, and spending way too much on trade shows and conferences is no stranger to industrial sales, just worse! One of our clients told me once, "If the customer wants to go to a whore house, you go to a whore house, if he wants to go to church, you go to church!" But those "Mad Men martini lunch" days are long gone, today industrial equipment firms are very well run and good places to work. They are that way because many times 60 percent of their sales are from parts. You don't fire experience when you need it to stay in business. One firm I've worked for offers parts on machines made in 1946!. There are still very few women in manufacturing, mining and engineering and the trade shows are 95 percent men. The only real benefit in the young is smarts. If you can get along with others, have a high IQ (or just work harder) and are goal oriented, you will easily get a high paying job for life.

The apology that Lyons gives to Spinner, the person that nabbed the Times article (that Dan pissed all over) points out what's wrong with his disrespect for marketing. I'm the one that gets my clients published in the trade journals and my clients appreciate it. They would have gotten coached and would have been demoted if they pulled the stunt Halligan did. I'm past the midpoint of the book and Dan still hasn't explained what it is that makes Hubspot great software. Why I enjoy their educators, my small group coach and my account manager. We're focusing on basic marketing principals and developing content that gets the phone to ring. Instead of making fun of Marketing Mary I wish Lyons would have described her typical day and the understanding her boss has about internet marketing and the realistic goals they work together to accomplish. That's what makes Hubspot great, nowhere to be found in Disrupted.

In the end, Disrupted is about awful office politics and the journey of a 50-something displaced journalist. (I get that because I'm married to someone who has been through a similar career disruption). That happens when a company doesn't have employees that just do the right thing. I've found that if I have to micro-manage anyone, I made the wrong decision to hire them. It's my fault and I have to deal with it. I've struggled since 9/11 with trying to get the rudder back on the ship, but it's the economy that rises all boats. We work on the principal that we will always deliver the best job possible for our clients even if we lose money on the job. At least we'll know how to quote a similar job the next time. That's the base of our marketing pyramid, next is the referrals of the clients we have. The next level is the companies we meet at the major machine tool, chemical and mining conferences. Companies that are in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. At the top of the marketing pyramid is our web site. It's always been an educational site that gleams from nearly 40 years of learning best practices from creating attention-getting advertising to working with the technical journal editors and designing literature. We have the number one page on "Literature Design" on Google and Bing. HubSpot helps us focus these resources, add to them and properly promote them. That's what every good company should be doing and HubSpot can help you and your company do it. I'm all in.

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