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"Catch Some Rays" with Your Mining Equipment Marketing "Battery!"

Fri, May 05, 2017 @ 04:32 PM / by Bill Langer posted in Business to Business Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Mining Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Marketing Communications, Industrial Marketing Content, Industrial Branding, Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing News Release

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Gravel Batteries - As green energy proponents address its intermittent nature, good old-fashioned gravel may provide a solution.


Renewable energy is becoming more and more popular these days. We recently jumped on the band wagon and had solar panels installed on our home in Anthem, Ariz. On average, we have 299 sunny days per year, so it is a pretty darn good investment.

The down side to energy from solar panels and wind turbines is their on-off nature. When the wind stops blowing or the sun stops shining, the energy production stops. That is not a problem for us, because we are still connected to the grid and can get power even when the sun doesn’t shine. But believe me — they know how to charge rate payers who have solar! 

Mining Equipment Marketing Fun.jpg 

In order to make solar and wind commercially viable, there needs to be some method to store excess energy production for use when there is no sunshine, no wind, or during peak demand. Electricity cannot be stored easily, but construction of a new battery gigafactory in the United States, as well as other high-tech methods on the horizon, may be part of the solution.
 
While we wait for new technology to catch on, there are some pretty good solutions already in place. Some environmen-tally friendly methods use — you guessed it — gravel. In terms of supply chain, handling, and construction, few materials are as cost effective, easy to obtain, and simple to use as gravel.
 
The most common method to store energy is pumped hydro storage. During excess solar or wind production periods, water is pumped uphill into a reservoir. During low or non-production periods, the water flows down through a generator to a lower reservoir. Very simple; very easy. However, hydro storage takes up a lot of space. An idea is being batted around where the water and reservoirs would be replaced by huge buckets filled with gravel. Excess energy produced will be used to haul the rock uphill in a ski-lift kind of contraption. When energy is needed, gravity will carry the rock downhill, producing electricity on its downhill trip.
 
There are a few somewhat more sophisticated ideas in the works, where excess energy is converted to thermal energy and then stored in giant gravel “batteries,” thus evening out the intermittent nature of wind turbines and solar panels.
 
One example is in Steinfurt, Germany. Rather than build an expensive tank, the battery is constructed underground in a covered pit. The storage material is a mixture of gravel and water. The side walls, top, and bottom are heat-insulated. The pit has a double-sided polypropylene liner with a vacuum control to identify leaks, and the liner is protected from the gravel by a layer of fleece.
 
When excess energy is available, heated water (195 degrees F) ‘charges’ the battery, either by direct water exchange (right side of the illustration) or via plastic pipes (left side of illustration). The hot water is stored until it is needed, at which time the water flow is reversed.
 
The use of rocks for thermal storage is attractive because rocks are not toxic, non-flammable, and inexpensive. The main problem I see with gravel batteries is convincing my wife to allow me to tear up our entire backyard landscaping and fish pond so I can replace it with a big hole filled with gravel and pipes. Is that really too much to ask? AM
 
Read the original article here in AGGREGATES MANAGER April 2017, thanks Bill for contributing to our Mining Equipment Marketing blog. Have a great weekend.

If you would like to learn more about writing a process equipment marketing news release or an application story "One key to good public relations is writing a case study."


 

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Synchronous Motors and Drives - OEM Marketing

Sun, Apr 23, 2017 @ 10:37 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Marketing Communications, Industrial Marketing Content, Industrial Branding, Marketing, OEM Marketing

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4 ABM Drives Synchronous Motors and Drives 400.jpgThe following is an example of an OEM Marketing publicity campaign for an OEM to specify ABM Drives as an assembly for their equipment. It starts with basic educational publicity as the foundation for a modern internet marketing campaign. Marketing today is based on the fact that customers are educating themselves well in advance, before contacting any potential suppliers. They are doing this almost exclusively on the internet. Unless a company plays a role in the engineer’s education, they stand little chance of being the preferred supplier for a new product component. Traditional technical journals, many still in print, are the gate-keepers of the best technical content. Good publicity campaigns work with the editors and publishers of the trade journals as well as technical conferences. If your educational publicity campaigns are picked up by the technical press, you can be assured that it is worthy of investment, because of the long life the educational material will have, and the many ways it can be repurposed as video, audio, slide shows, demonstrations and presentations. 


Custom Sinochron® Synchronous Motors and Drives can Operate without and Encoder

The SINOCHRON® Motor design offers advantages in continuous duty applications. The efficiency is also better in partially loaded duty cycles, when compared to standard asynchronous motors. Drive units are virtually loss-free in no-load operation. This motor design offers advantages in powering conveying equipment; escalators, spooling machines, compressors and traction drive units amongst others. By substituting existing line powered three-phase drive units, energy savings of 20 to 35 percent can be expected.

SINOCHRON® is a synchronous motor with high-performance permanent magnets with a sinusoidal flux distribution (EMF). The anisotropic rotor geometry provides a sinusoidal distribution of the magnetic flux with the result of eliminating cogging. Stator windings are identical to asynchronous motor windings allowing for a cost-efficient production of the stators in large batch sizes. The SINOCHRON® Motor operates without an encoder and can replace a stepper motor in some applications. This patented technology combines high output, minimal investment and low operating cost.

The characteristic profile of these drive units makes them well suited to drive pumps and fans that operate continuously, no additional components, like encoders, are needed. Up to 30 percent smaller footprint, allows machine designs to be more compact. The motors have excellent control behavior and combined with included control unit SDC, have excellent true running even at very low speeds and impressive dynamics at impulse load and speed variations.

Continuous duty pumps and fans are now required to meet new efficiency regulations which require line powered three-phase motors and geared-motors with rated outputs of 0.2 up to 9.0 kW operating continuously at rated load (duty cycle S1) to be a minimum of efficiency class IE3 (premium efficiency) or IE2-drive units to be equipped with electronic inverters. Inverter powered SINOCHRON® Motors from ABM Drives economically meet these requirements.

About ABM DRIVES INC.

ABM DRIVES INC. engineers and manufacturers high-performance motor, gearbox, brake and frequency inverter solutions for machines, plants and mobile devices in hoisting technology, warehousing, material handling, electric vehicles, biomass heating systems, wind turbines and many other markets. Founded in 1927, the company belongs to the Senata Group with an annual turnover of nearly 400 million € and more than 2,000 employees. Approximately 300,000 drive units are produced annually. In-house manufacturing includes tool-and-die design, aluminum-casting foundry, CNC housing machining, manufacturer of shafts, cutting of gear teeth, motor development technology, assembly and final testing.

PRESS CONTACT

ABM DRIVES INC.

Gabriel Venzin, President

394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 110, Loveland, OH 45140

Phone: 513-576-1300

Mobile: 513-332-7256

E-mail: gabriel.venzin@abm-drives.com

Website: www.abm-drives.com

AGENCY
Lohre & Assoc., Inc., Marketing Communications

Chuck Lohre, President

126A West 14th Street, 2nd Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202-7535

Phone: 877-608-1736, 513-961-1174, Fax 513-961-1192
Mobile: 513-260-9025
Email: chuck@lohre.com

Reprinting permitted - specimen copy requested


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Metal Working Equipment Marketing Plan

Fri, Mar 17, 2017 @ 05:04 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Handbook, Marketing Communications, Industrial Marketing Content, Industrial Branding, Marketing

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To ThomasNet or not to ThomasNet, that is the question. Hmm, it means blogging to the rescue!

Industrial marketing communications directoryThomasNet, or Thomas Register as it was called years ago, has become a Platinum Hubspot resaler. It's not much of a directory any more since they couldn't compete with Google.  They are a good blogger as a good Hubspot dealer should be. A directory program with ThomasNet runs at least several thousands of dollars to start, but like our advice for purchasing search engine ad words, "Don't do it until you have optimized your web site first." We've found that ThomasNet's directory is only good in certain industries that have adopted it as a platform to generate quotes. But even those are going away and Thomas' attempts to teach newbes is a losing attempt.

You'd think a "large machine shop" would be easy enough to get ranked for, but that's not the case. If metal working equipment marketing was easy, everyone would be doing it. The industry is quite sophisticated and run by those who have been operating computers longer than any of us. The second use of computers was to run a machine tool, the first was to calculate ballistic information for a canon. 

ThomasNet wasn't such a problem several years ago, it kept its data secret from the search engines, plus it didn't have very many pages indexed. And the search engines wouldn't show their pages anyway. Then ThomasNet signed agreements with the search engines and they are ranking better. But Google is fundamentally against a directory since Google would rather serve the company's web site rather than a directory. ThomasNet is a very good media for increasing your page visitors. We have seen traffic double in several cases. And our studies show that visitors coming from ThomasNet are just as high quality as those coming from organic searches. If your site is fairly well written and has all the regular features of a good site, like fast loading speed, there may not be any other way to increase traffic. See the chart results on ThomasNet.com for yourself at Alexa.com.

Metal Working Equipment Marketing.jpg
But all of this wouldn't be needed if you just blogged a lot more. It's the gift that keeps on giving. Looking at the chart above, we added all of the client's technical bulletins in the middle and started bloggin three times a week in the last third. If your website traffic isn't growing like this, you aren't marketing using the internet to your advantage.

So if there is one take-away it's this -- Program your site to measure goals. For industrial sites it's not a sale, it's going to be a contact us or a request for quotation page. Then you will be able to measure a tangible result of your industrial marketing efforts.


If you liked this post, you may like, "How To Realign Your Marketing Communications with Sales."

 Download our free guide to Sales Lead Generation.

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Industrial Social Media for Quarries

Fri, Jul 29, 2016 @ 04:13 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Industrial Branding, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing

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 (Thanks to Trevor Hall, Founder, Clear Creek Digital, for this great article in the July/August 2016 STONE SAND & GRAVEL REVIEW. We thought it was just going to be another marketer that was selling industrial social media to accounts that didn't use it industrially themselves let alone actually have experience working in a quarry, but Trevor is the real deal and has some good tips for quarries to improve their community relations.)


Social Media Can Help Improve an Operation

industrial-social-media.jpgOUR ONLINE NEWS FEEDS and social media accounts are more and more filled with websites and articles with catchy titles like "Top 5 Amazing Survivor Stories," "10 Apps for your iPhone," "8 Rocks That Look Like Celebrities." We all, myself included, get caught wanting to know more about these headlines. Many times we click and visit the information.

Called "listicles," these articles blend a list with short articles, and there are lessons to be learned from them. People read them because they appear - and typically are - quick to read, have an enthusiastic tone and spur creative disruption in our own minds. Most importantly, though, they grab our attention.

Everyone online is hammered with copious amounts of information every second of the day. Figuring out how to grab people's attention, even just for a few seconds, is a very challenging task. What is most daunting, espe­cially for quarries, is understanding how to communicate a very complex process like aggregates production with many different internal func­tions and processes in a quick, eye­catching and engaging message.

Finding ways to incorporate the kind of content that catches the eye of our industry and our communities, including residents near stone, sand and gravel operations, is a vital part of any community relations plan.

Know the Social Networks

Social networks like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube pro­vide new tools for aggregates opera­tions to tell their story.

Twitter: Posts are 140 characters or less, so it's important to link back to blogs or information on a different website.

Facebook: Users can share photos, videos and updates about a quarry or company with a "page" that is dedi­cated to that company or operation.

LinkedIn: A professional social network where users post their work experience and look for jobs. Companies also create pages on LinkedIn to share content.

YouTube: Users can share and com­ment on videos, which is one of the most popular and engaging forms of media today. These digital tools can/enhance a company's ability to engage neighbors, lawmakers and regulators. Also, these networks can be used to inform a pub­lic of something they may not know much about, including quarrying.

Online media's reach is huge and increasing. A majority of the global population is on some type of social network. With the growth of mobile technologies reaching even to rural Africa, many more people are likely to join. Further, the data shows that online social dialogues and infor­mation sharing are not just for a younger crowd anymore. Social media users 65 years of age and older have more than tripled in the past five years.

Recognize and Use Social Media Trends

It is vital that aggregates opera­tions recognize the trends of the online audience and appreciate its huge and growing size. Notice, I did not suggest that companies become "masters" of digital marketing. But recognition of best digital commu­nication trends can lead you on a wonderful path to exploring how to tell the story of your operation or your products.

Online and mobile video will also play an important role for every busi­ness and operation. It is predicted that by 2020, 80 percent of people will rely on video content to form opinions and/or support for busi­nesses and organizations. Aggregates producers are not exempt from this trend, and can enhance traditional community outreach with videos and photos.

Print publications or text on a screen can be enhanced with multi­media content that is easy to share with people who both support or are critical of a quarry.

Short and Shareable is the Way to Go

Try to grab attention of an online audience by using powerful and quick information. This is especially true for social media networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram because they rely on images and photos in addition to text.

Photos and video play crucial roles in grabbing the attention of view­ers. The more engaging your con­tent is, the more likely you are to see an increase in viewers. YouTube, the popular video-sharing site, is the second largest social network­ing site behind Facebook. More people are turning to YouTube to share and gather information than ever before.

For example, every day people are watching YouTube to learn how gran­ite is quarried and crushed, and there are videos with thousands of views on how limestone is produced.

Stone, sand and gravel companies can connect the value of their opera­tions to the personal benefit of the reader and their community. Right now, there aren't many aggregates producers in the United States fully utilizing social and digital media to share company information. So there is a great opportunity for companies and quarries to produce quality and positive content about the industry.

Using Social Media to Build a Brand

In print and online communica­tions, the words we use matter a lot. The recent presidential campaign has shown how audiences react to words used in tweets and images shared on Facebook.

Some people on social networks may negatively respond to a com­pany's content, regardless of how informative and engaging posts may be. One of the best ways to safeguard one's messaging from these tribula­tions is to make your content fun. Allow your organization to pull the curtains back a bit and show the human and humanitarian aspects of your company. It is harder for posi­tive and educational content to be perceived as anything but, and using facts and information is also a great way to address negative comments you may receive.

Staying positive, engaging and edu­cational is a great way to highlight employees, the communities you work with and the dynamic ways that rocks are quarried and crushed and shipped to customers. After all, the adventures of quar­rying are wonderful stories. It's up to you to share them. •

Trevor Hall is the founder of Clear Creek Digital, LLC, a digital communications and marketing firm focused on provid­ing those resources to mining and engi­neering organizations. Visit his website at www.clearcreekdigital.com.


(Thanks Trevor, Having a high performance site is the number one industrial marketing challenge, get it right and your industrial social media will pay off big.)


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12 Questions Every Manufacturer Should Ask Themselves

Wed, Jul 20, 2016 @ 11:12 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Industrial Branding, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing

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 (Thanks to Ken Maisch for this great article in the July 15, 2016 Cincinnati Business Courier. If you don't know the competition and the marketplace, you won't be able to grow your business.)

Ken_Maisch.jpgRecently I attended an economic briefing session to get some insight into where the economists saw us heading over a period of time. After the meeting, while I was reviewing the data we received, I began to think about TechSolve’s client companies and how they were preparing for changes in their customer’s needs, based on changing economics, and how they were and should be planning for future changes.

Over the last year, I have seen the business of some of my clients slow as much as 30%. On the other hand, I saw some of those client companies serving, growing, and thriving markets. I asked myself how each of these client groups was dealing with their particular circumstance. Our experience shows that client companies in a rapid growth mode are usually behind the curve and have to take exceptional steps to deal with this growth. It also shows that companies who see a drop in business usually go into a full blown pull back, as if their future will never be there again.

There will always be changes in our business cycles. There will always be new products and there will always be products that become obsolete. The “key” to sustaining a viable manufacturing company is based on its ability to deal with these changing environments. How nimble these companies are in changing times determines their overall ability to grow and continue a pattern of profitability.

There are twelve questions manufacturing companies should constantly ask themselves as they examine the future. Those are:

1) Are we intimately familiar with the market we serve?

2) How well do we know our competition?

3) What are the changing aspects of that market?

4) Is there a consolidation of players within that market?

5) How much of our overall revenue is represented by our top five customers?

6) Are we getting downward pricing pressure from that customer base?

7) Do we see increasing raw material costs?

8) Are we experiencing annual increases in our manufacturing costs that we can’t pass on to our customer base?

9) Are we consistently upgrading our equipment to maintain productivity?

10) Is “lean” thinking a part of our company culture?

11) Are we having difficulty in finding and keeping capable workers?

12) Is “productivity improvement” a part of our overall plan?

If you don’t know the answers to a majority of these questions I believe you will find life in a manufacturing environment to be difficult at best. Let’s take these questions and boil them down into three groups.

1) Market knowledge and marketing capability

2) Equipment capability and utilization

3) Productivity and cost control

Now let’s take a look at each area as they pertain to today’s manufacturing environment.

Market Knowledge and Marketing Capability

A thorough knowledge of your targeted market is essential. Knowing all the players, the competitive pricing levels each offers, and at what level you are competitive within this market enables more accurate quotations leading to a higher hit rate. We find this an area of weakness within some of our client base. Some know the names of primary competition, but aren’t sure at what level their pricing must be to earn new business. In the absence of this knowledge, companies price their products on what they perceive are the prices their competitors charge without a relationship between their real costs and the profit margins available at that level of pricing.

In addition to these pricing issues, it is imperative that companies understand the best way to address their target market. What is the best way to attract new customers? Is the internet and other electronic media the best way to find and get new customers? Is a more traditional sales approach preferable? Is direct customer contact better than a less direct approach. Does your product have an engineering or sales element? In all cases it is a must that you understand the “who” within your market. It is important to know who is the sales leader within your market, who is the “price” leader within your market, and which competitor has the strongest reputation and the “why” that is. Simply selecting a market in the absence of this knowledge can be a recipe for disaster. Growth in a new market or customer base can be much more successful if the answers to these questions are understood and addressed in the early planning stages.

Equipment Capability and Utilization

Businesses evolve and change over time. When manufacturing companies begin they usually locate and use the most economical equipment they can afford. Not always the most productive, but it gets the job done. Then over time they begin to invest in new technology and equipment that offers significant productivity advantages. They realize this is the long term answer to better controlling their costs. If new equipment is good, more must be better. Not always the correct solution. It is imperative that this new more productive equipment reach full utilization as quickly as possible. Otherwise the cost of having that equipment becomes a draw against profitability as our employees scramble to get it fully utilized and still keep the old equipment running.

New technology is only an advantage when it increases capacity and lowers cost. Owning and underutilizing the newest equipment will only increase cost, not improve the situation. As a process improvement company we understand and agree with consistently improving productivity, and when equipment is the answer, do the necessary economic justification and purchase the new equipment. Making sure that you understand your productivity levels and how it relates to your overall cost, is a must. And once you understand the importance of long term productivity improvements, budget to upgrade your equipment as your depreciation schedule dictates. The most productive companies we serve are those that justify and utilize the most efficient systems available and continually upgrade them as needs dictate.

Productivity and Cost Control

One of the greatest challenges manufacturing companies face is “how do I deal with the price reduction requests I get from my customers?” It would seem simple. We have to eat the loss of margin to keep the revenue. Well, you can only do this for so long. Sooner or later you run out of margin and unless you have taken steps to further control cost, you are suddenly in trouble. Once your organization has a firm handle on your real “fully burdened manufacturing cost/hour”, then cost control through productivity improvement is the answer. New equipment, as mentioned earlier, is part of the answer, but real productivity comes when our employees are empowered by understanding the real basis for our cost and the role they play in changing that basis. If your company is not actively involved in a Lean initiative, if you have not established “metrics” that confirm success, and if your company culture is not one of consistently improving performance then daily struggles can become a way of life. Having a thorough understanding of your manufacturing costs, and then implementing a plan to address those areas that need improvement, will go a long way in strengthening profitability.

In summary, our country has always been involved in “making stuff”. Our manufacturing capability is second to none. I realize this as I see companies who have off shored their production only to realize they need to come home. Back to where real efficiency is understood and embraced. Back where “being the best” is not a bad term. And Yes, based on what our economists tell us, we will have ups and downs in our business cycles. But the best deterrent to down business cycles is productivity and the ability to cost your costs to be able to meet changing price demands. Our manufacturing future has always been bright. But now it more important than ever to continue to take those steps that will allow us to continue to be most productive nation in the world.


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Very Fast. Very Light. Very Safe. Very Good.

Fri, Jul 15, 2016 @ 01:02 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Industrial Branding

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Eastern_Sailplane.jpg

May 29, 2016

Dear Chuck,

    With my recent retirement, I have a little more time to reflect and felt the need to send you a “Thank You” letter. You have been doing my marketing/advertising for 15 years now. The type of ads I required were a little out of the ordinary. The combination of art and technology is always hard. For Schleicher sailplanes, First we sold expensive, exclusive recreational dreams, second we sold a level of technical sophistication for our aircraft of which Boeing would be jealous.  Combining the two is a certain balance which you understood right away. You “got it“ very quickly. Thanks. I’ve enjoyed the great ads you have created for us as well as the articles about our principal, Alexander Schleicher Sailplanes. Especially the interview with their new designer, Michael Greiner. Your article was at the start of his career. Then he went went on to create one of the most successful sailplane designs in the history of soaring.

And thanks for talking us into the digital age. Who would have known that our 50 something demographic would enjoy staying in touch on Facebook. Your posts of Schleicher news as well as our articles in SOARING MAGAZINE made for great content that grew our community.

From aerial photography to trade show graphics; ads to social media we’ll miss having fun with marketing. Retirement never comes easy and you hate to see your friends and customers get out of touch. But the soaring community always stays in touch and Linda and I look forward to future adventures with you and Janet.

Now one last plug about that new ASG 29, imagine your life is as long as a yard stick…..

Sincerely,

John Murray

Eastern Sailplane

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Food Engineering Magazine Field Report Preparation Guide

Tue, Jun 21, 2016 @ 03:46 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Process Equipment Marketing, Content Creation, Marketing Content, Industrial Marketing Content, Blogging and Blog Content Creation, Technical Editing, Technical Writing

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Content Creation: Food Engineering Technical ArticleHere are some pointers for preparing a Food Engineering Field Report—also known as an application story, success story or an application brief for our Dry Processing Technology section.

A Dry Processing Technology Field Report describes a problem and its solution. It may involve any product used in the food processing industry; for example, feeders, screening equipment, size reduction equipment, mixing/blending, bulk bag filling & discharging, mechanical conveying, pneumatic conveying, dust control, weighing systems, storage systems, micro and macro ingredient handling systems, thermal processing equipment (ovens, dryers) packaging equipment, metal detection/magnetic separation, process control system hardware and software, and so on. If you’re not sure whether your product, application or service applies, please call and we’ll brainstorm it. See sample Dry Processing Technology Field Reports attached.

Absolute requirements for publication

A submittal must contain the following or it will not be used.

  • Body copy of 500 to 700 words
  • At least two end user (food processor) quotes: perhaps one describing the problem and one suggesting that he/she is pleased with the solution, which should be quantifiable. That is, for example, it saved xx amount of time, reduced energy costs by xx percent, or the process improvements increased OEE by xx percent.
  • If you are unable to get end user (food processor) quotes, we may still have interest in the application story. We use this version online and in our bi-monthly eNewsletter. Think of these stories coming from a well know cereal manufacture or leading snack producer perspective. We require the same information, without the processor quotes or references.
  • Name of user company and name and title of person being quoted at the user Company

Quotes from supplier companies will not be used, and will be turned into straight text when appropriate.

  • Photograph of product, service, software at the food processor’s site—not a straight

product shot! Photograph must be print quality; that is high resolution jpg at 300 pixels per inch (ppi). Recommended physical size is at least 5x7 inches. Do not send Web quality. Don’t forget a suggested caption and photo credit. You may send more than one photo. Do not save screen dumps as jpg files! Use a non-destructive format (tif). Call for instructions!

  • Real name of a person, phone number and email at the supplier for more information

(sales contact)—no web addresses or sales@email.com addresses! 

  • Your contact info: Name, phone, email, address.

Please advise as to where this story may have already been published. If it has been used on a

competing publication’s website or in a printed magazine, we won’t be able to use it. If it’s been

published on a supplier’s website, we can use it as long as it’s not more than a year old. Obviously, if exclusive rights to use the story have already been given to someone else, please don’t send it to us. Please make sure of this first. Also, be sure you have cleared the story with the processor.

Please note: These stories are used on a FIFO basis (first in, first out). Publishing dates cannot be guaranteed, but complete submissions, of course, will be published before incomplete submissions.

Contact Debra Schug for more information: Debra Schug, Features Editor, Food Engineering,

schugd@bnpmedia.com, 847-405-4068.

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Blogging: A Most-Important Part of Your On-Site SEO Strategy

Fri, Feb 19, 2016 @ 12:54 PM / by Myke Amend posted in SEO - search engine optimization, Internet Marketing, Website Design, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Graphic Design, Internet Development, Advertising Design, Web Design

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When it comes to Internet Marketing the phrase "Content is King" is tossed around quite often, but when it comes to Internet Marketing, and especially Search Engine Optimization, it is important to remember that only the right content, the most relevant content to connect your business to your potential customer should reign supreme.

In considering how to streamline your site to attract visitors who match your several-to-many buyer personas, and when optimizing your site so that search providers can point these visitors your way, it is necessary to realize that there is no way that one or even a handful of pages could ever manage to cover all of this. Trying to gear even a forty-page site toward even one target audience, when so many possible keywords and long-tailed keywords are needed, will surely only result in a loss of keyword saturation per-page and hurt your search engine optimization.

Other Advantages of Fresh Content over a Static Page Site:

  • Static pages, though essential later in the decision-making process, do not make for the sort of content potential customers crave when seeking solutions.
  • Search providers are also on the hunt for fresh content in order to direct their users to the most relevant and most up-to-date information.
  • Having a larger site, allows for more-specialized content, each page with its own content geared toward a smaller, more-precise sample of the larger target audience, with content geared more-specifically toward their needs.
  • Blogging is not only the best approach at White-Hat SEO, it is a great way to avoid the pitfalls of Black Hat SEO

In order to understand why that last bit is so incredibly-important, one must first know a little bit about both White Hat and Black Hat SEO.

What is White-Hat SEO and What is Black-Hat SEO?

Search engine algorithms are constantly changing, and sometimes staying on top of it all can seem daunting, but when you think this work from a point of view outside that of a marketer, developer, or site owner, it all becomes much, much more simple:

The goal of the search engine is to connect users with the most useful, most precise, most specifically-targeted content to fit their needs. Site owners can benefit from this in that those who visit their site are more likely to be doing so intentionally, in search of related products, services, or solutions. Visitors also benefit from information relevant to the problem they are seeking to solve. These people may become return visitors or even customers, especially if they are brought to the correct page of the site to begin with, which is another important part of your site's relationship with search providers.

Ideally, these visitors will land on that perfect page to encourage them to stay and read. If that content is informative and interesting, that content likely to be shared or bookmarked as a part of the visitor's decision-making process. If that content does not offer valuable information, and does not give the visitor any feeling that they may be in the right place, the visitor will often return to the search provider and try other search results. You may never see them again, even if they were looking for services you offer.

Like visitors, search engines pick up on these things too. Search providers' algorithms are streamlined more and more every day to help their users find what they are looking for, and avoid sites or pages that misrepresent or fail to represent what they have to offer. This is why you need to learn how to recognize and avoid Black-Hat SEO tactics.

Some Signs of White-Hat SEO

  • You are looking to bring the right visitors to your site, which are visitors who have problems or needs that you can solve.
  • You are seeking to reward their visit with information valuable to their decision-making process.
  • You use accurate keywords in your content's description, title, and url.
  • Keywords can be easily found within the visible content of your page, and make sense in their context, because they are an actual part of the content.
  • Inbound links come from satisfied visitors, leaders in your industry, or magazines and blogs related to your industry.

A Few Signs of Black-Hat SEO

  • Keywords are repeated over and over in the content, to the point of making the content difficult to follow or unpleasant to read.
  • Keywords are in content that is hidden, where it serves no use to the visitor at all.
  • Inbound links are from pay-by-link sites, comments on blogs, pages/sites that serve no purpose other than to provide indexes of junk links.
  • Image alt tags are not worded to inform the reader, who may be sightless or may be a search crawler, what the image actually contains.
  • Content is duplicated from elsewhere, or copied and reworded to seem like unique content.

Black-Hat SEO is very-easily recognized if you think of it: Black Hat SEO is any approach that seeks to trick or manipulate search providers.

White-Hat SEO is just as easy to sum up: White Hat SEO is about creating great content in order reward the right visitors, and minimize bounce rates.

Bounce rates help no one. High bounce rates will only serve to make your marketing a more frustrating process, and prevent you from fine-tuning your marketing machine to reward the ideal visitor for finding your site.

Good SEO, and a good inbound marketing strategy is all about quality links from search engines leading to quality content specialized for quality leads. Quality *and* quantity are essential toward good keyword saturation because good keyword saturation is no-longer just about a page or a post, but the entire content of a site or domain. Site-wide keyword saturation *and* content keyword saturation work together to bring a visitor to the right page of the right site.

alt tags misused in web design can annoy those without sight and could harm search engine placement.

Diagram: How to annoy with alt tags

Blogging and Site-Wide Keyword Density / Keyword Saturation

Blogging is most beneficial from an SEO standpoint, not just in garnering shares and other relevant inbound-links to expand your authority, but in adding to the overall keyword density of your site. Adding to the keyword density of the site as a whole is much more effective than filling individual pages or posts with keywords. New posts also expand the site with fresh, unique content to be indexed, which search engines love.

If your site has 2000 original posts, and 1750 of those posts are somewhat-related to gardening equipment, your post on selecting the right tiller has a good chance of ranking well. If it is useful enough to be shared by a few individuals, it will rank even higher.

Image of advertisement done for Cincinnati Industrial MachineryThe Value of Unique Content

I stress original because unique content is very valuable to your SEO, but shared or duplicated content can have the opposite effect, and serves mostly to give authority to the website(s) of the originating source(s).

Have you ever searched for information and only found the same point of view over and over again in near-identical wording over a few hundred websites? Frustrating, isn't it? In order to eliminate this frustration, those sites that are sharing information, white papers, and other content provided to them, are far less-likely to get good search placement. - and reword as you will, it will likely be recognized as duplicate content. Doing this only serves to boost the search authority of the originator. Sharing, in moderation can be beneficial to your site's overall keyword density, if you don't overdo it, and remember to only share content that has value for your visitors.

Unique content through blogging (and blogging regularly) will allow you to have focused, targeted information on your site for the many individuals that make up your many prospective customers and will allow you to boost the authority of your site for all of those individuals as a whole.

Blogging has become the most essential on-site tool for inbound marketing, and is a must for anyone whose business model depends on being found through search providers.

 

If you are interested in our services for blogging, articles, news releases, advertorials, other content services or custom-building a CMS/COS for your web site, please don't hesitate to give us a call at 513.961.1174 or contact us through our contact page.

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Traits of a Good Public Relations Professional (From Consumer to Mining Equipment Marketing)

Tue, Dec 29, 2015 @ 09:32 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Public Relations PR, Industrial Public Relations PR, Mining Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content

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(Great post by Karla Jo Helms, it's a partnership between the media and the publicist. Unbranded educational material always helps your client and the publication whether SOARING Magazine or Mining Equipment Marketing.)

How do you find a PR professional that the media will listen to?

By Karla Jo Helms

How do you go about choosing a good PR professional or company?  There are many businesses that are in the dark about what makes a good PR professional simply because they are also in the dark about what constitutes effective PR.
 

Whether we like it or not, the media does represent a larger portion of the nation and the world and has a profound influence on the communication lines of our society.  If you are not crazy with the way the media portrays certain subject matters, that is understood.  But you may want to think twice before you completely write them off.  The media can present things in the improper light due to the fact that they just do not have all of the facts and the data they need to present a topic in the right way.  With all of the information and “facts” circulating out there can be difficult to gather the data one needs to cover a story the way it should be covered.  That is where a true PR pro comes into play. 

The PR Professional’s Duty

If the media is presenting things in an improper light due to the lack of the necessary data and facts, the origin of this problem stems from the failure of good information which should be coming in to the journalist which would provide them with the notion that there is more out there and more should be looked into.  

Perhaps there is another point of view that they could offer to their audience which would help more people?  Or perhaps there is something else they should pursue that would be beneficial to their reader or viewer base?  There is really no way for them to know so they go on the data that they have.  This is where a good PR professional can be beneficial to the manner in which the news is presented.  How? 

We see it as a PR professional’s duty to keep journalists informed of what is available to be known. This places a PR professional in a very important position, because they have the ability to have an impact on how the world is perceived by others.  The reality is there is a lot of good going on in the world and there are a ton of great businesses that are improving the lives of others on a daily basis.  There are also many people who are accomplishing great things for the betterment of communities and different causes that are often overshadowed by the doom and gloom stories.

The media will listen to you IF you understand the rules of engagement for dealing with the media.  The media has certain guidelines by which they operate and a great PR professional will know what these criteria are so they can communicate effectively.  A good PR professional will help the media as well as their own clients and customers; and one that can do this will be able to get their clients’ stories told.   

If you are genuine in your dealings with others and you have a product/service that improves the lives of others, a good PR professional can help you get that message to your target market in a big way.  Using the media as a resource in an invaluable avenue that can help you get a terrific return on investment for your marketing dollars, if done right!

Call JoTo PR for more information 888-202-4614, JoTo Extreme PR, 411 Cleveland Street, Suite 204, Clearwater, FL, US, 33755

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Food Engineering Magazine Field Report Preparation Guide for Process Equipment Marketing

Fri, Dec 18, 2015 @ 04:05 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Process Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, Industrial Marketing Content, Marketing Content, Food Process Equipment Marketing, Industrial Process Equipment

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Here are some pointers for preparing a Food Engineering Field Report by Debra Schug—also known as an application story, success story or an application brief for our Dry Processing Technology section. (Application articles are the foundation of any food process equipment marketing campaign. Chuck Lohre)

Food_Engineering_Magazine_Process_Equipment_Marketing.pngA Dry Processing Technology Field Report describes a problem and its solution. It may involve any product used in the food processing industry; for example, feeders, screening equipment, size reduction equipment, mixing/blending, bulk bag filling & discharging, mechanical conveying, pneumatic conveying, dust control, weighing systems, storage systems, micro and macro ingredient handling systems, thermal processing equipment (ovens, dryers) packaging equipment, metal detection/magnetic separation, process control system hardware and software, and so on. If you’re not sure whether your product, application or service applies, please call and we’ll brainstorm it. See sample Dry Processing Technology Field Reports attached.

Absolute requirements for publication

A submittal must contain the following or it will not be used.

  • Body copy of 500 to 700 words
  • At least two end user (food processor) quotes: perhaps one describing the problem and one suggesting that he/she is pleased with the solution, which should be quantifiable. That is, for example, it saved xx amount of time, reduced energy costs by xx percent, or the process improvements increased OEE by xx percent.
  • If you are unable to get end user (food processor) quotes, we may still have interest in the application story. We use this version online and in our bi-monthly eNewsletter. Think of these stories coming from a well know cereal manufacture or leading snack producer perspective. We require the same information, without the processor quotes or references.
  • Name of user company and name and title of person being quoted at the user Company

Quotes from supplier companies will not be used, and will be turned into straight text when appropriate.

  • Photograph of product, service, software at the food processor’s site—not a straight

product shot! Photograph must be print quality; that is high resolution jpg at 300 pixels per inch (ppi). Recommended physical size is at least 5x7 inches. Do not send Web quality. Don’t forget a suggested caption and photo credit. You may send more than one photo. Do not save screen dumps as jpg files! Use a non-destructive format (tif). Call for instructions!

  • Real name of a person, phone number and email at the supplier for more information

(sales contact)—no web addresses or sales@email.com addresses!

  • Your contact info: Name, phone, email, address.

Please advise as to where this story may have already been published. If it has been used on a

competing publication’s website or in a printed magazine, we won’t be able to use it. If it’s been

published on a supplier’s website, we can use it as long as it’s not more than a year old. Obviously, if exclusive rights to use the story have already been given to someone else, please don’t send it to us. Please make sure of this first. Also, be sure you have cleared the story with the processor.

Please note: These stories are used on a FIFO basis (first in, first out). Publishing dates cannot be guaranteed, but complete submissions, of course, will be published before incomplete submissions.

Contact Debra Schug for more information: Debra Schug, Features Editor, Food Engineering,

schugd@bnpmedia.com, 847-405-4068.


If you liked this you may also like to read our Media Relations guidelines.
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