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What's the difference between Type 304 and Type 316 stainless steel, and what differentiates L-grade stainless steel?

Thu, Dec 06, 2018 @ 02:06 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Marketing Communications, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Powder Bulk Engineering Magazine

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More Questions and Answers from POWDER BULK ENGINEERING

 
Q: Industrial equipment manufacturers offer several metal material options for equipment construction metal materials. What are the differences in metals? What's the difference between Type 304 and Type 316 stainless steel, and what differentiates L-grade stainless steel?
 
A: Paul Deegan, Vortex, says:
imageThe most common metals offered are AISI Type 304 and Type 316 stainless steel and AISI 1008/1010 or ASTM A36, which is typically referred to as carbon steel. These metals are used to construct the "wetted" parts in a piece of equipment — that is, those parts which come in contact with the conveyed material in a manufacturing process. Alternatively, the frame or structure in a piece of equipment is usually made from either aluminum or carbon steel because they offer weight advantages, cost savings, or both.
What is stainless steel
 
There are numerous stainless steel grades available, but Type 304 and Type 316 are the most commonly used in bulk handling and many other industries. This is because both types offer good corrosion resistance at a reasonable cost, compared to other steel grades. In addition, grades Type 304 and Type 316 are relatively easy to machine, bend, and weld. The alloying elements that are primarily responsible for corrosion resistance are chromium and nickel. Type 304 stainless steel contains 18 percent chromium and 8 percent nickel, while Type 316 contains 16 percent chromium and 10 percent nickel. Both elements are expensive and increased quantities of either element will make the steel more expensive, with nickel being more expensive than chromium. In fact, it currently costs more than five cents to produce a five cent ("nickel") coin. There are grades of Type 300 series steel that are more corrosion resistant than Type 304 or Type 316, but because they have increased amounts of chromium and/or nickel, or some other alloying element(s), they are, consequently, more expensive.
 
Stainless steels are "stainless" due to the addition of chromium. The reaction between chromium and oxygen creates a submicroscopic film of tightly-adherent, nonporous chromium oxide, which protects the underlying metal from contact with the environment. Chromium, when added to a steel in a concentration of at least 10 percent, is enough to form the chromium oxide layer at the steel's surface, rendering it stainless. A distinguishing factor between Type 304 and Type 316 stainless steel is that Type 316 also contains the alloying element molybdenum. Molybdenum reduces the tendency of chromium oxide layers to break down, therefore increasing the steel's corrosion resistance. Additionally, molybdenum benefits steel by increasing its strength at elevated temperatures. Adding molybdenum, however, requires the addition of more nickel as compared to Type 304. To understand why, it's important to understand the microstructure of various stainless steels. Imagine a cube in which the atoms are arranged at the corners of the cube, as well as in the center of each face of the cube. This microstructure is called face centered cubic (FCC) and is the structure of austenitic steel. Type 300 series stainless steels are austenitic. Oppositely, imagine a cube in which there are atoms at each corner of the cube, but instead of an atom in each face of the cube, there is an atom in the center of the cube. This microstructure is called body centered cubic (BCC) and is the structure of ferritic steel. During steel production, when a steel with BCC microstructure at lower temperatures is heated to high temperatures (above 1,670°F | 910°C), it will transition to FCC. As it cools, the steel will return to a BCC microstructure. However, some alloying elements will prevent the transition from FCC to BCC, while others promote it. Molybdenum is an element that promotes the transition, while nickel helps prevent it. Therefore, adding molybdenum requires additional nickel to keep the steel in the austenitic phase.
 
The "L" at the end of Type 300 series stainless steel grades such as Type 316L signifies "low carbon." Both Type 304 and Type 316 stainless steel have carbon contents of approximately 0.08 percent. L-grades stainless steel has carbon contents of approximately 0.03 percent. During welding, the carbon and chromium elements of 300 series stainless steels begin to react with one another, forming chromium carbide. Because the chromium is transformed into chromium carbide, there isn't enough chromium remaining in the steel to form the chromium oxide layer. This results in rust forming in the areas near the weld. By reducing the carbon contents in L-grade steel, the formation of chromium carbide during welding is hindered, and thus, lessens the chance for corrosion along welded joints. Accordingly, it's only necessary to specify L-grade steel for welded components.
 
As one of my mentors always used to say, "A true metallurgist responds to most metallurgy questions with, 'it depends.'" From the explanations above, you have likely noted the difficulties in assessing metal materials of construction. Because of this, industrial equipment manufacturers must assess applications on a case-by-case basis to ensure the equipment's success. Therefore, consult with process engineering expert before making equipment acquisition decisions.
 
Vortex, Salina, KS, supplies slide-gate and diverter valves, iris diaphragms, and loadout equipment for the dry bulk material handling industries.

Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your industrial marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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IEEE GlobalSpec and TREW Marketing 2019 Smart Marketing for Engineers Survey

Wed, Nov 28, 2018 @ 09:33 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Marketing Communications, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, TREW, IEEE GlobalSpec

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Top 10 Findings

Industrial marketing trends for 2019


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your industrial marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Why Cat changed its machine branding, "Aggregates Manager" Magazine Article Review

Fri, Nov 02, 2018 @ 11:00 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Marketing Communications, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing

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Cat’s new “Modern Hex” trade dress design will give machines a new look.

Industrial-Marketing-Branding-1


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your construction equipment marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Industrial Blogging – An Underutilized Content Marketing Tactic

Tue, Oct 30, 2018 @ 08:21 PM / by Achinta Mitra posted in Industrial Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Marketing Communications, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Achinta Mitra

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Industrial blogging is usually not a favorite subject of discussion with my manufacturing and engineering clients.

blog_10252018_attribution

Learn more by visiting Industrial Marketing Today where this editorial was originally published.

(Thanks for the great summary of industrial marketing Achinta you and I couldn't agree more.)


Do you have more serious problems than worrying about your processing equipment marketing? To get your feet back on the ground, read the following e-Book for advice on the basics of marketing from your MBA class. Or learn more from our Marketing Handbook page.

Strategic Content Creation Handbook by Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Lohre & Associates

 

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Metalworking Education for Marketers

Thu, Jun 14, 2018 @ 11:27 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Business to Business Advertising, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, marketing agency, Cincinnati Marketing Agencies

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Metalforming Processes and Materials For Non-Technical Executives, Directors and Managers

June 19, 2018—Cleveland, OH - This seminar provides attendees with a fundamental understanding of metalforming processes and their capabilities, the common materials specified for these processes, and various types of surface coatings and treatments that metalformed parts may require. Attendees involved in such areas as purchasing, quality, sales and management will gain a clearer understanding of material specifications, properties, and process parameters and capabilities to better serve internal and external customers; to more accurately specify and purchase material, and improve troubleshooting, problem reporting and root-cause analysis.

Metalworking Marketing Education

Topics covered:
• Important industry terminology and meaning
• Dfferences between flatteners, straighteners, and levelers
• Difference between “sheet” and “strip” metals (it’s not what you may think)
• Differences between flywheel drive and servo drive presses
• Why surface hardness specifications are not the best indicators that the metal you order will work in production
• How to properly order sheet material to assure you get what you need
• How to deal with international material specifications
• How new higher strength automotive materials affect your business and plant operations
• Difference between reactive, preventive, predictive and proactive maintenance programs
• True cost of die maintenance
• Acceptable stamping burr (it’s much less than you think)
• How does welding, molding, plating affect the stamping process
• Different types of quality measurement tools and equipment
Presenter

Peter Ulintz, Director of Technical Training and Workforce Development, Precision Metalforming Association

Agenda
8:00 a.m. Breakfast
8:30 a.m. Presentation
12:00 p.m. Lunch
12:45 p.m. Presentation
4:30 p.m. Adjourn

Seminar Location
Precision Metalforming Association HQ
6363 Oak Tree Blvd.
Independence, OH 44131

Hotel Accommodations
Holiday Inn Cleveland South Independence
6001 Rockside Rd.
Independence, OH 44131
216-524-8050

Reserve your room online or call the hotel directly to make room reservations. Reference Precision Metalforming Association to receive a special rate of $99 plus tax.

Hotel includes a complimentary shuttle to and from Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (call the hotel upon arrival to arrange pickup). Hotel offers free self-parking and a shuttle will be provided to and from PMA’s headquarters.

Registration Information

Through June 8
$399 PMA members
$599 Nonmembers

After June 8
$499 PMA members
$699 Nonmembers

Breakfast and lunch is included with your registration.

For more information, please contact Marianne Sichi at 216-901-8800 ext. 150.

Upcoming Seminars
June 26-27
Sheetmetal Technology
Cleveland, OH
August 15-16
Transfer Automation
Toronto, ON
September 12-13
Stamping Higher-Strength Steels
Nashville, TN
October 2-3
Designing & Building Metal Stamping Dies
Cleveland, OH
December 5-6
Deep Draw Technology
Cleveland, OH
View all upcoming PMA events

Copyright 2018 Precision Metalforming Association, All Rights Reserved.
Precision Metalforming Association, 6363 Oak Tree Blvd, Independence, OH 44131

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SMPS - CPSM Exam - Industrial Marketing Management

Sun, Dec 10, 2017 @ 10:37 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Business to Consumer Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Business Development, Industrial Marketing Promotion, Marketing

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The last SMPS Markendium Domain puts it all together. Managing a Marketing Dept. or Agency Couldn't be Defined Better

Four years ago I learned about Hubspot and went all in. I really enjoyed the specific internet marketing knowledge that it demonstrated and clearly showed principals of a agency how to follow. We had them convert our site and did everything they suggested. We got one client to implement it and that has been a great success. Not so much for the agency. Face it, the internet is mostly marketers, you can't sell generic marketing in the internet, just like you would be a fool to hire a brain surgeon online. Myke Amend, our weg guru, recently created www.industrialwebdevelopment.com, specifically about web design and management. It worked great and we have signed two new clients. Myke followed the Google instructions to create a great website. They are light years past Hubspot. In fact, you can't do what Google suggests with Hubspot. We're still a Hubspot Partner and I'll continue participating because in spite of their lack of advancements, they are still a very good general best practices and agency management tools.

Hubspot told you to build it and they will come. The Society for Marketing Professional Services tells you to deliver the most fantastic service you can, find similar clients and sell them the same type of work. To grow sell new services to existing clients. If that is successful, try selling it to other clients. it that simple. 

The management part of it is simple too. Clearly define marketing activities and their objectives that you can measure. I'm looking forward to defining what we're good at, adjusting for each of our personalities, and implementing SMART goals next year - Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Relevant and Timely.

 Industrial Marketing Management.jpg

 

Industrial Marketing Management Case Study Activity

This Case Study Activity allows you to reflect on and apply the key concepts that you learned in this Domain to a real-world scenario. Each Domain includes a scenario about the same organization, Gilmore & Associates. The scenario is presented to you, followed by several questions. You can also elect to view the recommended solutions/ responses for each question posed, which are located on the next page. This case study can be studied in many ways:

• You can individually reflect on the questions after reading the scenario, and write your own notes/responses to each question. You can then check your ability to apply the key concepts against the recommended solutions/responses.

• You can pull together a small group and use this scenario to drive a discussion around the challenge and to discuss solutions as a group.

• You can combine a selection of the case study activities (across the Domains) into a larger scenario-based activity as a part of a professional development event.

Thanks in large part to your efforts as the marketing coordinator, Gilmore & Associates has successfully transitioned into a new market. The firm used to only be known for designing K-12 educational facilities, but with a few high-visibility retirement community projects under its belt, it's begun to establish itself as an expert in this niche of older adult healthcare.

Firm leadership has recognized your role in this transition by offering you a management position. You agree to take on the responsibility of coordinating the efforts of staff and consultants to accomplish marketing goals and objectives, and ensure that every step in the sales process-from BD to writing a proposal-continues to run smoothly.

1. What are some processes that you could put into place to ensure the best possible outcomes for your marketing staff's performance?

2. What should be included in a pipeline report to help you track activity, hold your team accountable and ultimately help your firm reach its annual growth goals?

3. You notice that many members of your team express discomfort with their BD role. How can you create a training program that will build the skills that they need to develop more confidence in this role?

4. One of your team members has decided to go back to school to study nursing and you need to hire someone to fill the open marketing associate position. What · can you do to make your firm an appealing choice to job seekers?

5. What steps can you take to promote a firm-wide BD culture?

Answer Key

1. What are some processes that you could put into place to ensure th􀀡 best possible outcomes for your marketing staff's performance?

• Set clear expectations. Measure each staff member's knowledge areas and skill sets, and, based on those results, develop metrics by which they will be evaluated. Also encourage them to gain additional training and certifications, where needed.

I look forward to doing this with my guys. It might be cold calls by me, search engine optimization by Myke and we'll firgure out something for Rob to do. He's so shy.

Provide opportunities for your staff to find a mentor or coach. These relationships can greatly enhance their professional development over both the long and short term.

I'm afraid I'm all they have!

Establish clear lines of communication and provide regular feedback. Have regular team meetings about current and planned activities, as well as more informal one-on-one discussions about how each person is performing.

We'll have these meetings each month after we have put our "New Business" hours into the database.

Help them to develop a PDP that identifies a path for their individual professional development within the organization.

This will be fun. I'm lookng forward to seeing what Rob and Myke see as a management path.

2. What should be included in a pipeline report to help you track activity, hold your eam accountable, and ultimately help your firm reach its annual growth goals?

Information about each lead, including which staff member brought it to your firm's attention, which staff member will head follow-up activities and whether the lead is a previous client or a prospective one

We already have a good database to fill out. Putting numbers on it will help. We can use the "Estimate" field for this.

Information about the market and service sector that potential new work is associated with 

I've been wondering where we're going to get that info. The aggregate mining publications publish market trends. I think the chemical industry does as well.

A rough approximation of how much revenue that the project might bring into your firm and how much it will cost to pursue it 

We can put some numbers on this.

How likely you are to win the work based on what you know about the opportunity 

We can easlily guess this as well.

3. You notice that many members of your team express discomfort with their BD role. How can you create a training program that will build the skills that they need to develop more confidence in this role?

Recognize that some people will never be completely comfortable demonstrating a particular skill-for example, speaking in public or writing proposals. Encourage your staff to focus on enhancing skills within their natural abilities and comfort zone. However, be sure to differentiate between people who will always hate networking (or some other skill) and those who just need more training to succeed.

Rob can give us all a primer on Adobe Applications.

Conduct a training needs assessment via observation, individual interviews ;and group. questionnaires to determine in what areas your team is strong and where they could use additional instruction.

This will be fun. I'll have to pay them to go to Dale Carnegie but that's Ok.

Develop a regular schedule of training opportunities. Include both formal and informal (e.g., lunch and learns) training opportunities at appropriate frequencies.

We'll be going over this study guide for most of 2018.

Make sure that the training sessions are hands-on and simulate the real world. For a training session on proposal writing, have participants write a sample proposal. For one on interviews, conduct a mock interview.

We can all do this in our sleep.

Create a maintenance plan so that the training schedule is not dropped once your employees attend the initial sessions. For long-lasting improvement, people must have regular opportunities to practice learned skills. 

American Marketing Association was one group a fomer employee was active in and did serve on the board. Nothing came of it.

4. One of your team members has decided to go back to school to study nursing, and you need to hire someone to fill the open marketing associate position: What can you do to make your firm an appealing choice to job seekers?

• Offer to help HR develop attractive and well-written job announcements for various mediums.

• Know what motivates the people who will be searching for a job in your industry-this includes an interest in the work, opportunity for growth, a sense of accomplishment and earned recognition-and tailor your recruitment announcements to address these needs.

• Consider the target audience for the job opening. A marketing associate is an entry-level position, so your candidates are more likely to be recent graduates in the Millennial.Generation than Baby Boomers.

• Make sure that your web site is up-to-date and attractive, and that the "Apply for a Job" tab is easy to find from the home page.

• Consider setting up a booth at college career fairs. Sell the culture of your firm at the booth and select staff that will relate well to Millennials.

All great ideas. We need to have more about the culture of the company online. It';s not like we don't do many extra off line activites.

5. What steps can you take to promote a firm-wide BD culture?

• Recognize that it takes time for BD efforts to show obvious pay-offs and encourage your staff to view the development of client relationships as a long-term and continuous effort, as opposed to a task that is only done when the firm needs new business.

• Include sales training in your firm training program so that your team develops good selling habits.

We're going to have  great 2018!

 

Contents

1. Supervise Marketing and Support Staff

1.1 Define Roles, Joo Descriptions, and Expectations

1.1.1 Structure :Your Department

1.2 Establish Performance Outcomes, Expectations, and Metrics

1.3 Identify Training and Professional Development Needs

1.4 Provide Mentoring and Coaching Opportunities

1.4.1 Mentoring

1.4.2 Coaching

1.5 Have Regular Team Meetings

1.6 Help Staff Create a Personal Development Plan (PDP)

1.7 Conduct Performance Evaluations

1.8 Key Terms

2. Develop an Internal Marketing Communications Program

2.1 Track and Communicate Relevant Information

2.1.1 Pipeline Report.

2.1.2 Track Upcoming Industry Events

2.2 Establish Regular Meetings with Stakeholders

2.2.1 Create an Agenda

2.2.2 Distribute a Detailed Report

2.3 Create Awareness of Company's Services/Offerings for Cross-Selling

2.4 Key Terms

3, Develop, Implement, and Maintain Information Management Systems

3.1 Conduct a Needs Assessment

3.2 Select a System

3.3 Develop an Implementation Plan

3.3.1 Build Company Buy-In

3.4 Develop a Maintenance Plan

3.5 Develop a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) System

3.5.1 Select a CRM System

3.5.2 Outline the Data to Be Housed in the CRM

3.5.3 Implement the CRM System

3.5.4 Maintain the CRM System

3.6 Key Terms

4. Conduct Marketing Training Sessions

4.1 Establish Outcome/Competency Alignment for Marketing, Business Development (BD), and Sales Positions

4.2 Conduct a Training Needs Assessment

4.3 Identify Training Resources

4.4 Develop a Schedule/Calendar of Training Programs

4.5 Evaluate and Refine Programs

4.6 Key Terms

5. Attend Professional Development Activities

5.1 Identify Expectations for Staff Involvement

5.2 Identify Organizations to Participate In

5.3 Train Staff to Network

5.3.1 Information Sharing

5.3.2 Keep in Touch

5.4 Develop Your Professional Network

5.5 Assess the ROI of Participation

5..6 Key Terms

6. Recruit Personnel

6.1 Coordinate with HR

6.2 Write Job Descriptions

6.3 Highlight Your People

6.4 Promote the Job Opening

6.4.1 Assess Your Results

6.5 Market Your Firm as the Most Attractive Choice

6.6 Look to Other Sources of Talent

6.7 Key Terms

7. Comply With Business and Accounting Principles

7.1 Know the Benefits of Understanding Financial Information

7.2 Learn the Basics

7.2.1 Charge-Out Rate

7.2.2 Target Multiplier (aka Charge Multiplier) 7.2.3 Net Multiplier

7.2.4 Overhead Rate

7.2.5 Staff Utilization Ratio

7.2.6 Current Ratio

7.2.7 Net Profit Ratio

7.2.8 Accounts Receivable Collections

7.2.9 Financial Statements

7.2.10 Tracking Backlog

7.3 Understand the Project Lifecycle

7.3.1 Getting the Project

7.3.2 Doing the Project

7.3.3 Finishing the Project

7.4 Understand Basic Contract Principles

7.5 Key Terms 

8. Promote a Firm-Wide BD Culture

8.1 Develop and Implement Strategies to Advance a BO Culture

8.2 Understand Models of BO Cultures

8.2.1 Valley of Death

8.2.2 Sales Success Cycle

8.2.3 Rainmaking System

8.2.4 Performing BO during Project Execution

8.2.5 Building Relationships

8.2.6 Internal Marketing Examples

8.3 Define Roles, Responsibilities, and Training across Firm

8.3.1 Marketers

8.3.2 Technical Staff

8.3.3 Senior Management

8.3.4 Nontechnical Support Staff

8.4 Assess and Develop BO Talent

8.5 Key Terms 

If you would like to do the right thing, give me a call for lunch and a...

 Complimentary Green Building Consultation

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SMPS - CPSM Exam - Industrial Marketing Promotional Activity

Sun, Dec 10, 2017 @ 01:37 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Business to Consumer Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Business Development, Industrial Marketing Promotion

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This is the Domain I have been waiting for. It's most of what I have been doing the past 40 years. Industrial Marketing Promotional Activity

I started at the drawing board 40 years ago at my Father's advertising agency. $3.10 per hour. I lived in the basement of a nearby home for $45 per month. I remember the first night I stayed there, the gays above me were having a huge shouting match! I enjoyed sucking Rapidio pens and drawing mining equipment. And slowly made a name for myself because I enjoyed preparing perfect materials for the printer. I still don't know how the vice president knew I had been up all night working on the boards. Must have been something in my eyes.

I learned everything from client relationships, the friendships, the events and creativity from my Father. They all were important in a people business like advertising. I came in during a depression and we grew a little after that but never regained the glory days of the agency in the 60s. Dad left for the Florida Keys in the 80s and started other businesses. I took over the day to day and to this day I think about him at 5 pm when he used to call after the rates went down.

Dad passed away in 1999. That was the high point of the agency. We almost broke one million in sales. Then 9-11-01 and we were struggling like every other consultant. The economy recovered and seemed to be on fire, it was. I got involved with SMPS on the advise of Pete Strange the president of Messer Construction. I found the chapter very welcoming and volunteered for the board of president Alison Tepe-Guy. I served two terms but then the housing crisis hit. I gave up on growing the agency with building material clients. Until the last couple of years in which I have attended Greenbuild, the premier show for high quality building materials. I'm looking forward to putting to use all the information I have absorbed from trying to pass the exam over the last ten years.

Promotional-Activities.jpg

 

Case Study Activity

This Case Study Activity allows you to reflect on and apply the key concepts that you learned in this Domain to a real-world scenario. Each Domain includes a scenario about the same organization, Gilmore & Associates. The scenario is presented to you, followed by several questions. You can also elect to view the recommended solutions/ responses for each question posed, which are located on the next page. This case study can be studied in many ways:

• You can individually reflect on the questions after reading the scenario, and write your own notes/responses to each question. You can then check your ability to apply the key concepts against the recommended solutions/responses.

• You can pull together a small group and use this scenario to drive a discussion around the challenge and to discuss solutions as a group.

We talk about promotional activities every day at our office at Washington Park. That's what I live and breathe. You get a bit of that sense reading the CMPS Domains. The folks that wrote these know that we're in a people business. Everything revolves around people. I'm lucky to have  Myke Amend join the company, he's a shy but gregarious creative. A great writer and an incredible programmer.

• You can combine a selection of the case study activities (across the Domains) into a larger scenario-based activity as a part of a professional development event.

I plan to evaluate each of my clients based on these Domains.  It will help me understand the interrelationships of the Domains and learn how to approach those clients with new ideas to improve their marketing.

Gilmore & Associates' first year in the new market has been a successful one-with two winning proposals and one completed project, you are ready to get your company's message out in front of a wider audience. Your CEO wants the firm to become well known for designing state-of-the-art facilities for serving the healthcare needs of older adults.

As the marketing coordinator, you have been given the responsibility of developing a plan to raise awareness of your company in the minds of prospective clients, and to set the stage for establishing your firm as a thought leader in the industry.

This is the problem we get asked everyday. But never get the background information needed to achieve the results. It used to be that we could come up with a clever ad and succeed. No more.

1. Before you engage in promotional activities, you must have a message to deliver. What are the elements involved in the creation of a corporate identity?

This isn't that hard to do. Tying it into a relevant marketing plan normally doesn't get addressed. or maybe we never got the feedback. I once told a client that feedback was a strategic re-positioning strategy. He disagreed and said it was a tactic and not a strategy. We never did get the market they were going after so had no idea what to present.

2. What activities should be included in the communications plan that your team develops?

I'd sure like to get more information for any ad we are asked to develop. Normally it's an attempt to present the product benefits versus the competition. The core message a sales person should be sure to explain to a prospect. This was a great approach to an advertisement in the past and may still be but nailing the benefit versus being boring is the fun part. Making it memorable is the most important. The most important activities are to educate the sales force on the message to be delivered and present it through events, presentations, meetings, social media and in the office.

3. You've decided to create a video to gain your firm more visibility. What should you keep in mind when developing/filming a high-quality multimedia advertisement?

Used to be that we got $1,000 per minute to produce a video. Now clients want to do it for $100 a minute. Smart phones are great if you have a good remote mic but you still need a great script and a good spokesperson.

4. Your firm is proud of the project that it recently completed, and would like to give it greater visibility by entering it into an awards competition. What should you consider when searching fo􀀲r an appropriate competition to submit to?

The Domain guide gives great guidelines to picking awards. I especially liked the suggested into who won and what the judges want.

5. The first year anniversary of your company's entry into the new market is coming up, and you want to plan a special event for the occasion. What steps can you take to ensure that the event makes a favorable lasting impression on potential and current clients?

We made our office LEED Platinum to enter the construction market but no one in the industry cares. It's only what the client wants. We may be able to work with those sustainable firms as like minded companies but it's easy for the designers and consultants to be Green. We have received educational work from institutions and hope to grow that. I have worked very hard to be the best educator in the Green Building movement and won't back down one bit from that position. It's just an eye opener to realize that it might take 20 years to get out of the "Valley of Death."

Answer Key

1. Before you engage in promotional activities, you must have a message to deliver. What are the elements involved in the creation of a corporate identity?

• Conducting primary research to determine how your brand is currently viewed by others (i.e., a perception survey)

• Determining whether others' perceptions of your company lines up with the image that you want to project

• Developing a vision and mission statement that defines your firm's core purpose

• Creating an identity map to determine where your firm stands in relation to your competitors in the market 

• Developing a corporate identity program that institutes firm-wide standards regarding naming conventions, graphic design elements and messaging in order to better maintain a consistent brand

All great ideas and the proper way to approach marketing.

2. What activities should be included in the communications plan that your team develops?

•  Creating strategic objectives that set the priorities and direction for communicating with clients, potential clients, the community and other key audiences. What response are you looking for?

• Defining your target audience, based on demographic and psycho graphic characteristics.

• Developing a social media plan that uses inbound marketing to engage with your audience on the appropriate platforms.

• Developing interesting and creative content that can be used to share knowledge through various social, digital, and analog platforms.

• Maintaining an integrated website.

• Selecting which types of ads and sponsorships to engage in (including earned, pay-to-play, and owned platforms). 

Once again, great guidelines and right on approaches.

3. You've decided to create a video to gain your firm more visibility. What should you keep in mind when developing/filming a high-quality multimedia advertisement?

• Tell a story, but make sure that it includes only what is essential so that the entire story can be told in a few minutes.

• Make sure that the quality of the production is consistent with your firm's overall image.

• Research the elements of video production and decide what tools you will need to produce the quality that you want. This includes finding a DSLR camera/camcorder with the right specs, deciding what frame rate/resolution it should be able to shoot at, and what type of microphone to use to capture sound.

Dead on.

4. Your firm is proud of the project that it recently completed, and would like to give it greater visibility by entering it into an awards competition. What should you consider when searching for an appropriate competition to submit to? 

• What are your next opportunities for entering an awards competition? Create a system to keep track of awards opportunities, and update it with information gathered by contacting A/E/C associations, reading relevant publications and reaching out to your network.

• Does your project meet the criteria of that particular awards program?

• Will winning the award boost your firm's visibility in your target
market/audience?

• Do you have a good chance of winning the competition? Review the past winners and compare them (objectively) against your own project.

We became the Greenest Office in Cincinnati. Nothing happened. Probably not the right type of promotion to identified targets. We did learn that it is the client you have to find. That was harder than we expected and possible to find. We have put into place a grass roots program over the last three years and hope that results in the type of client that doesn't put energy savings at the top of their list. That's not the point of environmental sustainability. I was told yesterday that only 5% of office space had converted their incandescent bulbs to LED. My clients and prospects have created multi million dollar businesses doing those conversions. I should be able to help them with better research and planning.

5. The first year anniversary of your company's entry into the new market is coming up, and you want to plan a special event for the occasion. What steps can you take to ensure that the event makes a favorable lasting impression on potential and current clients? 

• Clearly define your goals for hosting the event before you begin planning it.

• Develop a creative concept that represents your firm's personality and appeals to your target audience.

• Create a checklist of every activity and task that must be accomplished both before and during the event, along with who is responsible for implementation. Include contingency plans for anything that might go wrong.

Great action items. 

Contents

1. Develop and Maintain Corporate Identity

1.1 Use Primary Research to Determine Brand Perception and Identity

1.2 Develop a Vision and Mission Statement

1.3 Develop a Unique Value Proposition

1.4 Create an Identity Map

1.4.1 Generalist vs Specialist

1.4.2 Client Driven vs Market Driven

1.4.3 Design vs Execution Focus

1.4.4 Unique vs "Me Too" Player

1.5 Determine Elements of a Corporate Identity Program

1.5.1 Brand Architecture and Naming Conventions

1.5.2 Graphic Design Elements

1.5.3 Messaging

1.6 Create Standards

1.7 KeyTerms

2. Develop and Implement a Communications Plan

2.1 Develop a Communications Plan

2.1.1 Define Your Communications Objectives

2.1.2 Engage Firm Stakeholders

2.1.3 Identify Key Topics

2.1.4 Define Your Target Audience

2.1.5 Create a Set of Communications Initiatives

2.2 Develop a Social Media Plan

2.2.1 Determine Target Audience and Goals for Each Platform

2.2.2 Best Practices for Developing a Plan

2.2.3 Track Progress, Determine Reach/Followers, and Track Return on Investment (ROI) Metrics

2.3 Maintain a Web Presence

2.3.1 Determine Website Strategy

2.3.2 Merging Current Systems with New Site's Structure

2.3.3 Integration

2.3.4 Benchmark Competitors' Websites

2.3.5 Monitor and Manage Analytics

2.4 Key Terms

3. Media Relations

3.1 Strategy and Planning

3.2 Maintain a Media List

3.2.1 Research National Publications in Key Market Segments

3.2.2 Local List

3.3 Draft News Releases

3.3.1 Sample News Releases

3.3.2 Assign Responsibility to In-House Staff or an Outside Consultant

3.4 Distribute Approved Release

3.5 Contacting the Media

3.5.1 Follow-Up Protocols

3.6 Publish Newsletter or Journal Articles

3.6.1 Choose a Topic

3.6.2 Getting Published

3.6.3 Determine the Communication Channel

3.7 Train Staff to Interact with Media

3.7.1 Identify Personnel to Interact With the Press

3.7.2 Training

3.8 Key Terms

4. Create Digital Content

4.1 Using Multimedia

4.2 Videos

4.2.1 Video Marketing

4.2.2 Develop a Video Plan

4.2.3 Legal Issues

4.3 Audio Podcasts

4.4 Key Terms

5. Coordinate Photography

5.1 Develop a Plan that Aligns with Marketing, BD, and Strategic Plan Goals

5.2 Identify Budget and Resources

5.2.1 Photographing People

5.2.2 Photographing Projects

5.2.3 Stock Photos

5.3 Elements of a Strong Photo

5.3.1 Taking the Photos Yourself

5.4 Best Practices for Working with Architectural Photographers

5.5 Legal Issues

5.6 Key Terms

6. Prepare Award Competition Entries

6.1 Why Enter?

6.2 Track Award Opportunities

6.3 Determine Likelihood of Winning Award

6.4 Include Visuals

6.5 Include the Voice of the Client in the Award Narrative

6.6 Budget Time and Resources for Editing, Proofing, Etc. 

6.7 Key Terms

7. Develop an Advertising Plan

7.1 Establish an Advertising Rational

7.2 Relate Goals and Target Audience to Overall marketing Plan

7.3 Different Types of Ads and Sponsorships

7.3.1 Institutional or Image Advertising 7.3.2 Service Advertising

7.3.3 Tombstone Advertisements

7.3.4 Broadcast Advertising

7.3.5 Advertorials

7.3.6 Social Media Advertising

7.3.7 PBS Underwriting

7.4 Key Terms

8. Plan Trade show Activities and Conference Speaking

8.1 Decide Whether to Participate

8.1.1 Types of Trade shows/Conferences

8.1.2 Align Your Goals with Trade show/Conference Opportunities

8.2 Develop a Budget

8.3 Craft a Plan of Engagement

8.3.1 Choose Your Speaker's Topic

8.3.2 Identify the Appropriate Participants for your Booth

8.3.3 Constructing a Display

8.3.4 Level of Presence

8.4 Gather Information and Follow Up

8.5 Evaluate ROI Post-Show

8.6 Key Terms

9. Coordinate Firm Special Events 

9.1 Plan the Event

9.1.1 Define Your Goals

9.1.2 Identify Your Audience

9.1.3 Develop the Central Concept

9.1.4 Give it the Creative Sparkle

9.2 Check, then Double Check

9.3 Post Event

9.4 Other Corporate Entertainment Strategies

9.5 Key Terms

10 Select Vendors and Consultants

10.1 Define the Scope of Work

10.2 Select and Interview Vendors and Consultants

10.3 Manage and Direct Activities of Consultants

10.4 Key Terms

11 Case Study Activity

12 Glossary

13 Related Resources

14 Figures

15 Index·

16 About the Photographer

17 Peer Review

18 Body of Knowledge Subject Matter Experts (SM Es)

I love this entire Domain. Everything in it I have experienced first hand and agree with the analysis and methods.

If you would like to do the right thing, give me a call for lunch and a...

 Complimentary Green Building Consultation

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SMPS - CPSM Exam - Industrial Marketing Proposals

Sat, Dec 02, 2017 @ 09:00 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Business to Consumer Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Business Development

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Great Proposals Match Your People's Talents To The Client's Needs

Recently I listened to the award story for a theatre. It told several stories about the different types of groups that went to the playhouse. The young girl going to the Nutcracker for the first time with her grandmother. The story of a young couple going to Romeo and Juliet. The older couple enjoying an evening together with friends. And the young professionals so anxious to see and be seen. They had the director crying. The patrons wide eyed about the world that could be created as a part of their legacy. They are now seeking more funds to realize their dream.

This is a true story. The work went to a firm that wasn't known for their theatre work. Another secret ingredient was bringing in the best sound designer in the world. True Industrial Marketing Proposals follow this path.

Be sure to follow the instructions so you don't get uninvited to the party. And be careful you don't show your hand to your competitors. Many times subs will be included on several proposals, they aren't your friends.

Industrial Marketing Proposals.png

 

Case Study Activity

This Case Study Activity allows you to reflect on and apply the key concepts that you learned in this Domain to a real-world scenario. Each Domain includes a scenario about the same organization, Gilmore & Associates. The scenario is presented to you, followed by several questions. You can also elect to view the recommended solutions/ responses for each question posed, which are located on the next page. This case study can be studied in many ways:

• You can individually reflect on the questions after reading the scenario, and write your own notes/responses to each question. You can then check your ability to apply the key concepts against the recommended solutions/responses.

I have very little knowledge of these types of negotiations. I can imagine such things for my much larger clients but most of the time they didn't work out so well. Buying $100,000 worth of equipment to enter a new market only to find that it wasn't the performer you thought it was. The engineering world appears to be black and white but it isn't.

• You can pull together a small group and use this scenario to drive a discussion around the challenge and to discuss solutions as a group.

• You can combine a selection of the case study activities (across the Domains) into a larger scenario-based activity as a part of a professional development event.

Gilmore & Associates, the mid-sized engineering firm you work for, has been presented with a game-changing opportunity. You've recently been leading the effort to transition your firm away from working primarily in the education sector, and towards healthcare projects that serve the growing retiree community in the area. One of the prospective clients that your team has been building a relationship with has just mentioned a new project that they will be embarking on in the upcoming year-a retirement community with a built-in rehabilitation facility that caters specifically to the needs of older adults.

This project is perfectly in line with your firm's strategic objectives, and the CEO is excited to go after it. It doesn't take long for your decision team to reach a "go" decision. Knowing about this project early on gives you plenty of time to develop a winning proposal.

1. Since your firm hasn't worked on many healthcare projects before, you are considering forming a partnership with a more experienced firm to improve your chances of winning the project. What factors should you consider when evaluating a firm as a potential partner?

2. The client releases the RFP, and the convoluted structure of the document makes it difficult to parse out what, precisely, is being requested. How can you ensure that you fully comprehend and meet all of the proposal requirements?

3. What can you do to make your proposal stand out?

4. You are informed that your project team has made the short list. You and two other firms have been invited to present on how your design for the retirement facility will best meet the client's needs. What can you do to prepare for the upcoming presentation and interview?

5. Your hard work has been rewarded-your firm won the project! How can you make the most of the debriefing session to help you relive this success in future proposals?

1. Since your firm hasn't worked on many healthcare projects before, you are considering forming a partnership with a more experienced firm to improve your chances of winning the project. What factors should you consider when evaluating a firm as a potential partner?

• Compare the skills and expertise required by the client against your firm's ability to provide them. Would a potential partner be able to fill in the gaps?

Most recently we have won work writing technical articles but the price points have been hard to make. These are very complicated mechanical engineering articles about electric motors and gearboxes. I wonder how or who I would partner with. I don't like the typical response from writers, "That's what I do, write about things I don't know about." Usually I'll research the internet for everything publically shared and then distill it down to two or three thousand words. But even that put us upside down about 100% for the project.

• Evaluate the strength of your relationship with the client. Do you have ties with the decision makers in the client's firm? Would your proposal benefit by partnering with a firm that knows the client better?

• Consider the culture of the firm that you're thinking about teaming with. Is it compatible with your own firm's culture, or will it require a major adjustment? Do your teams get along?

The tips about how to negociate things other than the price are good. Timing. Rights. What other things could I ask for. They have already given us a testimonial letter.

• Does the client have participation goals for SDBE firms?

2. The client releases the RFP, and the convoluted structure of the document makes it difficult to parse out what, precisely, is being requested. How can you ensure that you fully comprehend and meet all of the proposal requirements?

I'm thinking about doing the same thing with these Domains. Fo me, the real reason I'm studying is to learn how to grow my company. I've learned that you need to grow from your employees' strengths. You need to match that with growing markets. Doesn't sound too hard. The hard part is finding the right audience. You can't by a list or do any kind of shotgun approach. Mailing to a list or even, like I do, go to trade shows to approach the right audience. Sometimes VP of sales is looking for a new agency at a show, they do have marketing on their mind. But the real way to market is to right a focused web site, like Myke Amend did for us, industrialwebdevelopment.com has brought us two new clients that are perfectly matched to our skills, and very profitable.

• Use a compliance matrix to deconstruct the RFP and reorganize it so that related information is grouped together.

• Develop questions and submit any requests for clarification to your point of contact in the client's firm.

• Find out if the questions and answers will be posted publically for your competitors to see.

• Ask your BD team what they know about the client's hot buttons. This information can be used to figure out their unstated requirements.

This happens if you have an inside champion. If you don't, don't even bother bidding.

• Create a detailed work plan, complete with a schedule for tracking proposal elements and assigning responsibilities, so that none of the proposal requirements are ignored.

3. What can you do to make your proposal stand out?

• Build your proposal around a unifying theme that highlights the differentiators that your firm has that will most benefit your client.

• Tell a story, through examples and statistics, of how your team has provided value for similar projects in the past. Use text and graphics to create an engaging narrative. For example, the ways in which your experience designing K-12 schools have prepared you for designing this similarly-sized retirement facility.

• Think about why each project team member was selected and highlight their expertise.

• Keep the focus on your client-how your firm will address their worries, hopes, and needs.

The last public works project I bid on, we lost. We did everything above but there was something we didn't know. Something we weren't told. The large web site project went to another firm and was typified by the computer programmers hanging out in the parking lot smoking cigarettes. I wish we could have had a debrief but it wasn't offered. They did share a copy of the winning proposal but it didn't uncover any clues. The importance of having an inside champion can't be over stressed. I'm not sure how it all works, and not bitter about losing the work or wasting time but not knowing why they chose one firm over another is troublesome.

4. You are informed that your project team has made the short list. You and two other firms have been invited to present on how your design for the retirement facility will best meet the client's needs. What can you do to prepare for the upcoming presentation and interview? 

• Find out from your BD team what the client is looking for in the presentation. Identify and address their concerns with solutions that differentiate you from your competition.

• Visit the presentation space, if possible, or ask to see a picture of it so that you know what to expect on the day of the interview.

• Develop a storyboard to outline the presentation and ensure that all elements-salient points, graphics, narrative, etc.-flow together.

• Make sure that you have a contingency plan for anything that might go wrong, including technological difficulties.

• Rehearse the entire presentation at least three times, until all of your speakers can present their material conversationally and without notes.

5. Your hard work has been rewarded-your firm won the project! How can you make the most of the debriefing session to help you relive this success in future proposals?

8 Develop open-ended questions that encourage the client to talk freely. Consider the debrief a conversation, rather than a formal interview.

• Find out what aspects of your proposal and interview that the client likes the most, and the least.

• Ask for any recommendations that they have for your future submittals.

• Find out if there are any other RFP opportunities in the near future that your firm might apply for.

 

Contents

1. Prepare to Win

1.1 Make a Go/No-Go Decision

1.1.1 Build aDecisionTeam

1.1.2 Understand Which Factors Affect the Success of a Project

1.2 Identify Firms for Teaming/Partnering 

1.2.1 Affirmative Action Opportunities

1.3 Key Terms

2. Organize to Win

2.1 Read and Understand the Contents of the Request for Proposal (RFP)/Request for Qualifications (RFQ)

2.2 Conduct an RFQ/RFP Strategy Session

2.3 Develop a Work Plan 

2.3.1 Develop a Schedule for Tracking Proposal Elements

2.3.2 Develop an Overall Proposal Tracking

2.3.3 Use Templates

2.4· Key Terms

3. Respond to Win

3.1 Draft a Cover Letter

3.2 Draft a Proposal

3.2.1 Tell a Story

3.2.2 Spotlight Your Experts

3.2.3 Use Graphics

3.2.4 Use Direct and Concise Language

3.3 Complete Government Forms

3.3.1 Understand the Standard Form 330 (SF 330)

3.3.2 Understand the Standard Form 255/254 (SF 255/254)

3.3.3 Differentiate Your Firm

3.4 Develop and Implement a Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Process

3.4.2 Determine Who Will Participate, and How

3.5 Key Terms

4. Present to Win

4.1 Develop Your Presentation/Interview Strategy

4.2 Prepare Presentation Materials 4.2.1 Determine the Format of Your Presentation

4.3 Select Personnel Based on Your Proposal Strategy

4.4 Identify Presentation Meeting Space and Equipment Needs

4.5 Rehearse

4.5.1 Conduct a Mock Interview

4.6 Key Terms

5. Close to Win

5.1 Develop a Proposal Close-Out Process

5.1.1 Update Content Resources

5.1.2 Organize the Files

5.1.3 Log Win Rates and Pursuit Costs

5.2 Conduct a Post-Award Debriefing

5.2.1 Choose the Participants

5.2.2 Develop Open-Ended Questions

5.2.3 After Action Reviews (AARs)

5.3 Determine the Fee Structure

5.3.1 Understand the Types of Fee Structures Available

5.3.2 Research Historical Costs of Similar Projects 

5.3.3 Be Able to Understand the Contract and All Obligations

5.4 Perform Contract Negotiations

5.4.1 Mitigate Risks

5.4.2 Identify Negotiable vs Non-Negotiable Items

5.4.3 Determine Participants

5.4.4 Collaborate

5.5 Draft a Contract

5.5.1 Understand the Difference in Contracts between Different Delivery Models

5.5.2 Understand the Differences in Contract Relationships

5.6 Sign the Contract

5.7 Key Terms

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SMPS - CPSM Exam - Industrial Marketing Client & Business Development

Wed, Nov 29, 2017 @ 10:01 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Business to Consumer Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing, Business Development

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Industrial Client and Business Development activity is centered around people you can trust.

The first business development question you need to ask yourself about a potential new client or business relationship is if you can trust them. Trust them to do what they say. Trust them to take you calls. Trust them to champion your relationship with the account. In exchange, you have to act in their best interest. If you want to grow your company, you need to build on your people and the successful work you have done. Everything can lead to another thing, and it's the best business marketers that uncover those opportunities and nurtures their associates to fill those new needs.

Business-Develpoment.jpg

Case Study Activity

This Case Study Activity allows you to reflect on and apply the key concepts that you learned in this Domain to a real-world scenario. Each Domain includes a scenario about the same organization, Gilmore & Associates. The scenario is presented to you, followed by several questions. You can also elect to view the recommended solutions/ responses for each question posed, which are located on the next page. This case study can be studied in many ways:

• You can individually reflect on the questions after reading the scenario, and write your own notes/responses to each question. You can then check your ability to apply the key concepts against the recommended solutions/responses.

• You can pull together a small group and use this scenario to drive a discussion around the challenge and to discuss solutions as a group.

• You can combine a selection of the case study activities (across the Domains) into a larger scenario-based activity as a part of a professional development event.

Your firm, Gilmore & Associates, has committed to becoming a leader in the construction of high-end retirement homes to meet the needs of a rapidly growing market. The company is well established and highly regarded in your geographical area, but is best known for its work building K-12 school facilities.

As the marketing coordinator, you need to come up with a strategy to leverage your strong relationships in the community to identify a new set of clients in the older adult healthcare industry. This will involve taking advantage of your current network and activities areas to develop a different line of business.

1. What are the two types of performance metrics that you could use to evaluate the success of your staff's BD efforts?

2. Through your existing network, you've identified five local firms as potential clients and received initial introductions. How can you use these budding relationships to gather information on the best way for your firm to enter the retirement community market?

3. One of your BD staff members is becoming close to a decision maker at a prospective client's company, but the efforts spent on developing the relationship are much greater than those being spent on any other prospective client. What do you need to consider in order to tell whether any eventual work gained with this client is going to be worth the added expense now? 

4. Although most of your BD energy is currently directed towards making new relationships in this new market, you don't want to completely lose touch with clients that your company designed schools for in the past. What steps can you take to maintain a relationship with the clients with whom you want to keep
in contact?

5. Gilmore & Associates implemented a new CRM system just over a year ago, and you notice that many staff members do not feel comfortable using it. Many of them use their own individual systems of relationship tracking, and as a result, the information on the firm's CRM system is already out of date and is poorly integrated with the other data management systems. What can you do to address this problem and maintain a useful system? 

1. What are the two types of performance metrics that you could use to evaluate the success of your staff's BD efforts?

• Activity-oriented metrics. These include the number of sales calls or contacts made, the number of events attended with prospective clients, the number of research projects performed, etc.

• Results-oriented metrics. These include the number of new contracts written, the number of RFPs received, dollars secured vs dollars sought, etc.

2. Through your existing network, you've identified five local firms as potential clients and received initial introductions. How can you use these budding relationships to gather information on the best way for your firm to enter the retirement community market?

• Look for partnering opportunities. If one of those potential clients has a new project on the line that your firm isn't experienced enough to do alone, you may still have some value that would enhance a competitor's proposal. By working on the project with them, you gain the experience necessary to later pursue a project on your own.

• Find out who those firms identify as thought leaders in the industry. These are the people whose ideas you may want to study and apply, as appropriate, to your own organization. Collaborating with thought leaders is also a good way to make your firm better known in an industry.

• Conduct a client perception study. Data from perception surveys can show you how your firm is viewed within this market-for instance, whether your services are widely known, or how you compare to the competition. You can also ask about the trends that impact their business and who they view as the leading providers of certain services.

3. One of your BD staff members is becoming close to a decision maker at a prospective client's company, but the efforts spent on developing the relationship are much greater than those being spent on any other prospective client. What do you need to consider in order to tell whether any eventual work gained with this client is going to be worth the added expense now? 

• The decision of whether a client is "worth" the pursuit depends on what your firm's strategic and marketing goals are, and whether the client is likely to help you to achieve them compared to the level of risk associated with investing in a relationship that might not pay off. The goal is to obtain a high return on investment with the lowest possible risk. 

For me, the best indication that you have a real shot is when you meet with the president of a company first and they introduce you to the VP and other managers. It's their blessing that make all the difference. of course, I've courted those presidents for decades. Just wating for them to make their move.

• Since Gilmore & Associates wants to gain experience in a new market, targeted clients will include those in the targeted market who will ultimately be able to bring you into that market. This might include clients who have interesting projects to which you want to attach your name and gain publicity through, those who have multiple projects lined up that you could perform, and those who can recommend you to other potential clients in the same market.

• The client might be risky if they c1lready have an existing long-term relationship with a competing firm, if they have a high turnover rate among their decision makers, or if the company has been involved in any litigation.

4. Although most of your BD energy is currently directed towards making new relationships in this new market, you don't want to completely lose touch with clients that your company designed schools for in the past. What steps can you take to maintain a relationship with the clients with whom you want to keep in contact?

• Assign a client manager to each account who will be responsible for nurturing and maintaining that relationship.

• Make sure that your past clients are kept up-to-date on any service lines or skills that you add to your repertoire. Social media is one tool for accomplishing this.

• Contact former clients every now and then just to say hello and see how things are going. Use your CRM system to keep track of what is happening in the organization, and in their personal lives.

5. Gilmore & Associates implemented a new CRM system just over a year ago, and you notice that many staff members still do not feel comfortable using it. Many of them use their own individual systems of relationship tracking, and as a result the information on the firm's CRM system is already out of date and is poorly integrated with the other data management systems. What can you do to address this problem and maintain a useful system?

• Create a document that defines the process for data entry. Each user should know exactly what information they should be tracking, and how to do so.

• Schedule additional, hands-on training sess·ions with each user group. Check in periodically in the months afterward to see if ongoing training is needed to ensure that all users are comfortable with the system.

• Keep track of which user is adding what information. This way, problems with integrity that is isolated to one user can be addressed by providing that user with more training.

• Perform a regular evaluation of the entire system at least once per year to confirm that the data it contains is accurate. 

Contents

Domain 3: Client.& Business.Deveiop􀀇ment

1. Create Business Development (BD) Strategies

1.1 Understand the Entire Sales Process

1.2 Identify Goals Based on Markets, Client Types, and/or Services

1.3 Set Baseline and Sales Performance Metrics and Standards

1.4 Develop Project-Pursuit or Capture Plans

1.5 Focus on Differentiation

1.6 Key Terms

2. Research Prospective Client Industries

2.1 Research Industry Trends

2.1.1 Set the Stage for Effective Research

2.1.2 Consider the Following

2.1.3 Use the Results

2.2 Research Strategic Partners and Influencers

2.2.1 Associations

2.2.2 Joint Ventures

2.2.3 Alliances

2.2.4 Design-Build Partnerships

2.3 Identify Thought Leaders

I thought the tip to ask prospects what thought leaders they follow was a great idea. I've never had a client be able to tell me that. Most recently it has been just the general importance of their web site. That is the real thought leader today, but that's not very inspiring. The second most important thing I hear and judge clients on is quick, personal and sincere response to every inquiry. One client guarantees a reply within two hours.

For me, it's this SMPS path. The writers and producers of these Domains are the most up to date and documented industrial marketing system I have seen. With multi-million dollar industrial equipment sales, selling is much more like selling a building design and construction than lower priced more emotional decisions taught with the Sandler, P&G or Dale Carnegie Systems.

2.4 Conduct Client Perception Studies

2.5 Key Terms

3. Pre-Qualify a Client

3.1 Develop Client Evaluation Criteria

3.2 Research the Client's Financial Stability

3.3 Determine Repeat Client Potential

3.4 Determine if the Client Fits With Your Firm's Culture and Values

3.5 Determine Whether the Client Provides Your Firm With Opportunities for Growth

3.6 Determine Profitability Potential

3.7 Key Terms

4. Pre-Qualify a Project

4.1 Develop Criteria for Project Go/No-Go Decisions

4.1.1 Does the Project Adhere to Your Business/Marketing Plan Objectives?

4.1.2 Can You Differentiate Yourselves to Wire or Win?

4.1.3 What is Your Potential for Meeting Profitability Targets?

4.1.4 Do You Have Relevant Expertise?

4.1.5 Consider the Intangibles

4.2 Conduct Continuous Re-evaluation Throughout the Sales Cycle

4.3 Key Terms

5. Build a Relationship with Prospective Clients

5.1 Understand How Trust is Built

5.2 Understand How to Conduct Warm or Cold Calls

5.3 Execute Access Strategies

5.4 Evaluate the Strength of Your Relationships

5.5 Develop Client-Specific Differentiator Strategies

5.6 Leverage Social media Channels

5.7 Key Terms

6. Maintain a Relationship with Past Clients

6.1 Identify the Clients You Wish to Keep in Contact With

6.2 Develop a Key Account Strategy

6.2.1 Provide Solutions and Reduce Client Hassles

My Dad always told us to say, "I'll find out," when you got a question you didn't know the answer to.

6.2.2 Nurture and Build Business Through Cross-Selling

6.3 Identify a Client Manager for Each Account 

6.4 Develop Communication and Outreach Strategies

6.5 Determine How Accounts will be Measured and Tracked

Research, Plan, People, Measure, Report, Improve and Repeat - these themes are repeated over and over in any best practice. For P&G's sales method, it's setting a goal and determining the steps to reach it. 

Ten years ago, before I knew much about re-positioning, I pitched a simple method,"Quality, Education, Feedback." I lost the account, the VP of Sales said because that was more tactical and he wanted strategic.

6.5.1 Four Stages of Account Tracking Systems

6.5.2 Identifying Your Needs

6.6 Develop Rewards and Incentives

6.6.1 Managing Conflict

6.7 Obtain Feedback and Update Your BD Plan

6.8 Key Terms

7. Choose, Implement, and Maintain a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) System

7.1 Document Your Goals/Expectations

7.2 Research CRM Tools

7.3 Define the Process for Data Entry

7.4 Implement the System

7.4.1 Provide Implementation Resources and Training

7.5 Maintain the System

7.6 Key Terms

8. Measure Client Satisfaction and Address Gaps in Performance/Results

8.1 Determine Your Objectives ·

8.1.1 Satisfaction

8.1.2 Loyalty

8.1.3 Influence 

8.2 Determine the Methodology (Direct vs Indirect)

8.3 Determine the Frequency of Outreach

8.3.1 Firm and Client Impact

8.3.2 Project-Specific Events

8.4 Design the Research Instrument

8.4.1 Interviews

8.4.2 Surveys

8.5 Key Terms 

 

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SMPS - CPSM Exam - Industrial Marketing Planning

Sun, Nov 26, 2017 @ 08:08 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Business to Consumer Marketing, Construction Equipment Marketing, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Mining Equipment Marketing, Process Equipment Marketing

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Industrial Marketing Planning is Based on Research.

What markets are growing, what markets are shrinking? What people skills to you have to move into different markets. But that's the research part of the problem. Once you have the research, you need to go after the market. 

Marketing planning will match your employee's talents to the emerging markets you have identified. Client and business development will manage the budding client relationships. Proposals will get you the work. Promotional activity will help your first successful project in the new industry be known. Professional management will put into place the tools needed to rinse and repeat.

Case Study Activity

This Case Study Activity allows you to reflect on and apply the key concepts that you learned in this Domain to a real-world scenario. Each Domain includes a scenario about the same organization, Gilmore & Associates. The scenario is presented to you, followed by several questions. You can also elect to view the recommended solutions/ responses for each question posed, which are located on the next page. This case study can be studied in many ways:

• You can individually reflect on the questions after reading the scenario, and write your own notes/responses to each question. You can then check your ability to apply the key concepts against the recommended solutions/responses.

• You can pull together a small group and use this scenario to drive a discussion around the challenge and to discuss solutions as a group.

• You can combine a selection of the case study activities (across the Domains) into a larger scenario-based activity as a part of a professional development event.

Your mid-sized engineering firm, Gilmore & Associates, has long been a leader in the construction of K-12 school facilities. Recent changes, driven by aging Baby Boomers and an influx of retirees, have caused this market to decline, and your CEO is looking to expand into the healthcare industry. As the marketing coordinator, you've made an assessment of you firm's current situation and it's clear that things need to change, as well over half of your current revenue is coming from school construction.

However, your preliminary research has identified several exciting new possibilities, including the need for upscale retirement homes and hospice facilities. Your CEO has tasked your group to come up with a marketing plan that will set the firm up to succeed in this new environment.

1. Based on the demographic data, you've established that there's a growing need for healthcare facilities in your area. You're also clear that the strengths of your firm align better with building retirement homes rather than hospitals or clinics. What type of research would best help you in creating a plan that will turn these insights into a workable marketing plan?

2. Besides conducting research, what are some of the key steps that you will take to develop your marketing plan?

3. What things will you need to keep in mind when developing your marketing budget?

4. What are some of the strategies that you will put into place to reach your marketing goals, as set forth in the plan?

5. What measures will you put into place to assess how well your plan is performing?

Answer Key

1. Based on the demographic data, you've established that there's a growing need for healthcare facilities in your area. You're also clear that the strengths of your firm align better with building retirement homes rather than hospitals or clinics. What type of research would best help you in creating a plan that will turn these insights into a workable marketing plan?

Since you're already clear on the demographic trends in your area, research how large the retirement home market will be for your area over the next five years (for example).

You will need to decide whether to do your own research, perhaps by conducting surveys in carefully selected communities, or rely on secondary research by looking at existing industry data and local government research. The decision will come down to a question of cost and how much good data already exists. You will probably need to gather both qualitative and quantitative data-qualitative, in the sense that good retirement home design is something of an art; and quantitative, in that you will need to have hard numbers to back up any projections that you make about the number of facilities that will be needed.

2. Besides conducting research, what are some of the key steps that you will take to develop your marketing plan?

Identify the marketing forces that affect your business. For example, you can use Porter's Five Forces model to assess your relative bargaining strength with potential clients, your relationship with suppliers, and how you measure up to the competition.

Participate in strategic planning with senior staff to clarify the overall goals and objectives of the organization, to provide a context for the marketing plan that you are developing.

Develop a vision statement that encapsulates the firm's strategic objectives, and reflects how you want the company to be perceived in the marketplace. Just as you have been seen as the premier provider of school facilities in the region, your new goal is to become known as the Cadillac of the retirement home industry.

Develop clear and quantifiable goals; for example, you could decide that your goal is to partner with a healthcare provider to build two profitable retirement facilities over the next two years.

Identify specific target markets. Where are you going to locate your retirement facilities? You may want them close to an existing hospital, for example, and within an easy bus ride to a cultural center.

3. What things will you need to keep in mind when developing your marketing budget?
You'll need to decide on a budgeting methodology. Will you use the Projection Method, which looks at prior year costs to develop the upcoming year's budget? Or the Percentage Method, which allocates a set percentage of the firm's total operation revenues to marketing? Or will you go with Goal­Based Budgeting, which assigns costs to each item in your marketing plan?

You'll have to budget for labor costs, by estimating the time that everyone in the firm will devote to marketing. This includes not only marketing staff, but the time spent by principals in marketing and selling.

You'll need to decide how to track expenses related to marketing, such as travel and entertainment, photography, printing costs, organization dues, office supplies, and the like.

4. What are some of the strategies that you will put into place to reach your marketing goals, as set forth in the plan?

Networking. You may find that firms that you .have partnered with in the past are also looking to get into a new line of business

Contacting professional organizations in the healthcare industry, to better understand the specific issues surrounding elder-care facilities and to get to know key players in the healthcare community

Developing a public relations campaign to get the message out that you are becoming a player in the healthcare industry

Building a presence on social media, both to advertise the new face of your company and to target prospective clients

5. What measures will you put into place to assess how well your plan is performing?
You may want to use a CRM system to track leads, proposals, and the activities that drive costs and revenues, even if you track actual expenses in an accounting system.

Lead reports, hit rate reports, and sales reports all provide quantifiable data on how well the company is doing month to month, and will provide an early warning if the plan is going off track.

Benchmarking allows you to keep tabs on internal progress; by evaluating progress against an internal goal of generating X number of proposals in an quarter, for example, the marketing team can judge whether it is on.track to fulfilling its overall goal of hitting its revenue goals.

A cost/benefit analysis of your marketing effort will let you know the value that you are getting for the money and time expended. The key is to understand the total costs in time and money, and to fully appreciate the value realized.
 

Domain 2: Marketing Planning

Analyze Data of Relevant Industries and Competitors

1.1 Understand Methods and Models of Research

1.1.1 Action-Driving vs Action-Confirming Research

1.1.2 Primary vs Secondary Research

1.1.3 Qualitative vs Quantitative Research

1.2 Identify Sources of Relevant Data

1.3 Prioritize Data for Relevance to Firm's Strategic, Marketing, and Business Development (BD) Plans

1.4 Reporting and Tracking of Data

1.5 Key Terms

2. Analyze Relevant Historical and Contemporary Data

2.1 Identify Sources of Relevant Data, Company's Historic Data (Internal and External)

2.2 Models for Identifying Market Forces

2.2.1 Porter's Five Forces

This really focuses on the power of the people that control the industry. They will not want you to take their cheese. Buyers will do what they have always done and may want a bribe. Suppliers won't help you learn their other customers. In common technologies, competitors are everywhere. I'm not quite sure what, "The best market is the one that is difficult to enter, yet easy to exit." If that was the case, I should leverage my Frank Lloyd Wright House.  It is what has gotten me into researching the architectural, engineering and construction markets but they have not been easy to enter. But learning this SMPS mythology will help me enter the market. TO wrap up Porter's Five Forces substitute products can't be invented that fast in marketing as long as you keep up with the internet. The final one is rivalry. There's a lot of that.

2.2.2 EPISTLE

Economic
Political
international
Socio-Cultural
Technological
Legal
Environmental

All of these things can prevent your success. They are why it is so frustrating to enter a new market or invent one.

2.3 Key Terms

3. Analyze Focused Market-Specific Data

3.1 Describe and Analyze Data

3.2 Forecast Based on Collected Information

3.3 Key Terms

4. Interpret Market Research Results

You always have to reconfirm your research.

4.1 Analysis vs Interpretation of Data

4.2 Forecast Based on Collected Information

4.3 Key Terms

5. Conduct a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) Analysis 

5.1 Understand How to Construct a SWOT Matrix

5.2 Tactics for Identifying Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats

5.3 Setting Priorities for a SWOT Analysis

Every marketing activity needs to start with thinking about your Strength and Weaknesses and your outside Opportunities and Threats.

5.4 Alternative Models

5.5 Key Terms

6. Collect Industry Marketing Cost Data

6.1 Identify Sources of Relevant Data

6.2 Analyze and Apply Data

6.3 Key Terms

7. Participate in Strategic Planning

This is always the easiest thing to say you are going to do but almost impossible to execute. With the help of this marketing methodology will help you succeed. I used to think they were a meaningless example of corporate bullshit. But when properly used a strategic plan really is a survival plan. You need to be a driven company whose goal is to enter new markets. Most strategic plans are just marketing mush, a real plan is a real need.

Strategic-Planning-Model.jpg

7.1 Understanding the Strategic Planning Process/Models

It's all hidden in the illustration. The target, the reason, the willpower, the weapons and the victims, "(you) will be the first to find, and profitably capitalize on, emerging opportunities before the competition can."

7.2 Understanding the Firm's Big Picture Operations and Finance

7.3 Bringing Relevant Data to the Table

7.4 Key Terms

8. Develop a Vision Statement - What you aspire to be?

Here's another one I just don't get. No words on a piece of paper can change the future. It comes down to caring. What do you care about? That is the only reason things change. Making a statement about yourself doesn't convince clients to work with you. Or your employees.

8.1 Understand Your Firm's Brand Promise and Core Values

8.1.1 What's Our Vision for the Firm?

8.1.2 What's Our Mission? Where do you want to go?

8.1.3 What Do We Want to be Known For?

8.1.4 What Do We Like to Do Most?

8.1.5 Who Are We Competing Against, and What Makes Us Different?

8.2 Analyze Your Firm's Current Position in the Marketplace 

8.3 Facilitate Discussion with Senior Leadership

8.4 Be Effective as Part of the Team (Team Dynamics, Collaboration)

8.5 Writing Skills

8.6 Key Terms

9. Develop Goals and Objectives

How are you going to get there?

9.1 Analyze Your Current Effort

9.2 Identify the Results (Sales, Positioning, etc.) You Want to Achieve, With a Time Frame for Achieving Them

Specific
Measurable
Attainable
Relevant
Tme-Based

9.3 Identify How Your Goals and Objectives Relate to Your Vision Statement, and Measurable Results for Goal Achievement

9.4 Internal Benchmarking, and Developing/Tracking Progressive Goals

9.5 Establish Performance Metrics

9.6 Key Terms

10. Facilitate the Planning Process

10.1 The Basics of Facilitation 

10.1.1 Wearing Different Hats

10.2 Understand the Firm's Goals

10.3 Keep Group on Agenda and Moving Forward 10.3.1 Managing Conflict

10.4 Involve Everyone, Making Sure Contributions are Considered and Included

10.5 Make Sure That Participants Achieve a Mutual Understanding

10.6 Record and Identify Related Action Items

10.7 Understand Different Motivations and Personality Types

Myers-Brigg Type Indicator
Decisive
Interactive
Stabilizing
Cautious

10.8.Key Terms

11. Select Target Markets

11.1 Examine Current Markets and Financial Performance for Each Market (Internal)

11.2 Review Market Research (Trends, Cultural, etc.)

11.3 Prioritize Opportunities that Maximize Your Firm's Unique Value Proposition·

11.4 Key Terms

12 Create a Marketing Plan

One year part of a 3-5 year strategic plan with specific training to be done and battles to be won.

12.1 The Components of a Marketing Plan

12.2 Facilitate the Planning Process to Support and Integrate with the Strategic, BD, and Action Plans

12.3 Key Terms

13 Create a Marketing Budget

13.1 Budgets Support Your Marketing Plan

13.2 Budgets Should Have a Structure that Relates to Your Firm Structure

13.3 Choosing an Appropriate Methodology for Budgeting

13.3.1 The Projection Method  or Comparison  - uses past expense to predict future costs

13.3.2 The Percentage Method - 3 to 18 %

13.3.3 The Goal-Based Budgeting Method or Bottom-Up Method - assigns a cost to each marketing activity

13.4 How to Budget for Labor Costs

13.4.1 Calculating Available Time

13.4.2 Budgeting for the Principals

13.5 How to Budget for Expenses

13.6 Key Terms

14 Set Marketing Goals

14.1 Strategies for Achieving Your Goals

14.1.1 Past and Current Clients

14.1.2 Cold Calling

14.1.3 Networking

14.1.4 Professional Organizations

14.1.5 Community Activities

14.2 Communications Activities

14.2.1 Branding

14.2.2 Public Relations

14.2.3 Social Media

14.2.4 Speaking and Writing

14.3 Key Terms

15. Manage lmplement􀀂ion of a Marketing Plan

15.1 Systems for Tracking Leads

15.1.1 Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Systems

15.1.2 Going the Extra Mile

15.2 Manage People Effectively/Understand Different Individual Motivations·

15.3 Key Terms

16. Manage the Marketing Budget

16.1 Systems Tools for Tracking

16.2 How to Manage Vendors/Consultants

16.3 Key Terms

17 Estimate the Impact of Marketing on the Bottom Line

17.1 Measuring Performance

17.2 Key Terms

18 Estimate Return on Investment of the Marketing Plan

18.1 Benchmark and Measure

18.1.1 Drivers vs Indicators

18.1.2 Understand How Your Firm Defines Success

18.2 Financial Basics

18.3 Systems for Tracking

18.3.1 The Marketing Budget and ROI

18.3.2 Tracking Your Overall Marketing Effort by Tactic

18.4 Key Terms

19. Conduct a Cost/Benefit Analysis of Marketing Efforts 

19.1 Understand the Total Costs (Time and Money)

19.2 Value-Based Decision Making

19.2.1 Quantitative Value

19.2.2 Qualitative Value

19.3 Basic Accounting Principles

19.4 Key Terms

20 Provide a Progress Report on the Marketing Plan 

20.1 Regularly Review Performance Metrics Related to Goals

20.2 Intervals

20.3 Presentation Techniques (Also Applies to Reporting Techniques)

20.4 Key Terms

21 Revise the Marketing Plan 

21.1 Update and Review Market Research for Changes in Market Situation

21.2 Adjust Marketing Plan to Reflect New Information

21.3 The 12-Month Rolling Budget

21.4 Key Terms 

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