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Industrial Marketing Review 3-2015 Foundry Management & Technology Ads

Sun, Apr 19, 2015 @ 11:41 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Advertising, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, print advertisements, Advertising Agency

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Didion Advertising DesignDiDion Advertising Design 2 
Very good ad with four excellent testimonials. Good information but they didn't have to go negative with "Competition relies on hype, bogus claims and negative scare tactics."
 

Mold Handling Ad Design
Very good ad that matches the copy claims with the montage of images. If you recognized your facility, they have the equipment for you.
 

Iko Advertisement design
This is just a line card ad of the material list they supply. I wish they would have touched on at least one benefit for each product. They could have been tied to the montage of images, they illustrate the products' usage.
 

FSD Advertising DesignAdvertisement Design by FSD 
A little disappointed with the waste of space in this two page spread. Forget the flags on the second page and tie some location and result to the seven images on page one.
 

Advertisement Design for Vibra-Drum 
Good information in the copy but wasted space by using just about the same view for a large and small image. Better to use one and make it a cut-away that pointed out some of the benefit features.
 

Efficient Advertising Design
Liked everything about this ad except for the headline, "Efficient, Reliable and Advanced." It would be better to tie a specific testimonial benefit to them like, 125% Efficient, 110% Uptime and 65% Energy Savings. The copy can back up the headline claims.
 

Ad Design for GIFA 
Typical show ad. There must be something visual they could use instead of an illustrated globe. Industrial times are much better so maybe they could tout the record breaking increase in technical presentations, exhibitors and attendees? To quote the Director, Friedrich-Georg Kehrer, “In contrast to many capital goods trade fairs at other locations, there is no sign of a decline of any kind at our four trade fairs. The four events hold an almost unrivalled position anywhere in the world. Düsseldorf is the only place where companies reach the entire global market and this is vital for their business operations.”
 

Advertising Design for EC&S 
Everything is good about this ad except for the order and the headline. Quote some customer saying, "They Engineered a Solution and Built it Too." Put that at the top, with a follow up subhead, the photos and at the end the logo and signature. Focus on the service and not the source.
 

Ad Design for Foundry Technology 
One of the best ads but the headline is a real bummer. Maybe, "Four Ways to Ask Us to Set Your Equipment or Concept-To-Completion!"
 

Advertising Design for Hunter
Great ad, wish they had the budget to make it a full page. It wouldn't look so crowded and hard to read if it was on a white field.

Advertising made Creepy 
The secret to a good ad is to associate a common, memorable metaphor that reminds a reader about your unique sales proposition. I'm not sure about this metaphor. You have to create ads that the sales guys will like to use to get their point across. Passing out rubber gloves won't get the kind of attention you're looking for. Maybe get permission to use Norman Rockwell's illustration of the family physician checking the little girl's doll with the headline, "Checkups Even For Your Dreams."
 

Solutions Advertisement
The Ask ads are always top notch. Just wish they could say something coming from that engineer's mouth. Like, "Take a Close Look at How Much You Can Save With Our Solutions."
 

Sinto Advertisement
Begs for a testimonial. What am I looking at? Please point out the features that deliver durability, reliability and production.
 

Advertisement for Ajax TOCCO 
Good content but you can't communicate anything if you don't get their attention and the only way you can do that is to speak to the reader personally. I'd use one of their engineers to be in the ad and make a statement about customer service.
 
Heavy Duty Advertisement 
What does that illustration have to do with the lame headline anyway? Maybe it will come to me later but that's not the point in an ad. I'd use a 3D illustration of their equipment and focus on one industry's material running through it. Oh, now I get it. It's a rave, the machine jumped onto the floor and is body surfing the crowd.
 

First Step Advertisement 
Great copy. Please, just let an intern be the spokesperson, "At XYZ Company I learned to ask for advice and then think for myself." Isn't that the type of employee you're looking for?
 
Advertising for Cor-Met
No need to duplicate the company name in the headline and signature. The packaging and metals tell the story, maybe put them together, if that will help catch a eye.
 

Creative Advertising 
Great ad. "The brain takes just 33 milliseconds-three hundredths of a second, or a tenth of a time it takes to blink-to decide whether someone is to be trusted," could be worked into the message and be more powerful.
 

Inverter Advertising
I'm dying to see a stop action illustration of this but the device is pretty self evident. Great ad but I can't read the company's name.

Foundry Advertising 
Good quarter page ad. Don't change a thing.
 

Advertisement for Fosco 
There must be something more interesting those engineers said than that. From their site, "dedicated teams strategically positioned across the globe." So, "Our Technical Staff in Guangdong Can Visit Your Plant Tomorrow."
 

 If you liked this post you may like, "How to Write an Industrial Marketing Telemarketing Script."


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Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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How to Create Emotional Marketing Communications

Wed, Mar 20, 2013 @ 11:04 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Industrial Marketing Advertising, Industrial Marketing Trade Show, Literature Design, Promotional Brochure Design, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Marketing and Advertising Fun, Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, Advertising Literature Design, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Cincinnati Literature Design, Advertising Agency, Ad Design

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To create marketing people love, you need to appeal to their emotions.

As said in his blog, "People buy on emotion—and justify by logic." You can learn more about emotional persuasion at the Wikipedia post where it lists these appeals to emotion:

  • Advertising
  • Faith
  • Presentation and Imagination
  • Propaganda
  • Pity
  • Seduction
  • Tradition

Breakthroguh Marketing Communications 1 resized 600
This ad "connects" with the viewer because it contains a human hand. The connectors on the fingers make you think about why they are there. Are they hurting the hand? What are they doing there? Adding a body part into an ad is like adding a person. It's also one reason testimonials are successful when there's a photo of the person, looking at you, telling their experiences. If the story is good enough, your opinion will be changed.

 

Emotional Marketing Communications 2 resized 600

Why does this ad evoke a visceral reaction? No one likes a messy job. Here's a solution. And then, there are those hands again! You only have a few seconds to introduce the main benefit and visual that backs it up. The double entendre, from something that you can hold in your hand to a push-button effort, always helps develop the main visual and headline. Your brain looks at it like a riddle. And who doesn't like trying to solve a riddle?

 

Emotional Marketing Communications 3 resized 600

This is one of the most humorous ads the agency has ever produced. It was fun to do and started out as a takeoff on the Splice Girls, but the lawyers said we had to make it a parody. So out went the attractive young ladies, and in came the construction workers dressed in drag. Those husky models were a bit surprised at the costumes we had for them! Like other successful ads we've done, it was immediately ripped out of the publication and stuck on the company billboard with callouts of the likely suspects in the company identified! It's the print equivalent of going viral.


Emotional marketing Communications 4 resized 600

This is the most "graphic" ad the agency produced and so were reactions. Some people really didn't like it, but most were amused and everyone remembered it. Phone calls to the client (immediately after publication) complained it cast the industry in a bad light. (The rendering business is in the business of reducing carcasses to pulp for further processing.) This ad style is hard to pull off. Industrial marketing's job is to tell a simple story with a benefit. Not to polarize the market or give the viewer any reason to go elsewhere. If you can't be funny, memorable and educational in industrial advertising, you're on thin ice. Negative ads almost always backfire in B2B. Your local TV news is all about bad news, social media is about good news. Read more about that effect in The Economic Times.


Emotional marketing Communications 5 resized 600

The use of strong, evocative words can make your ad work. The play on words leads to the small application photo.


Emotional Marketing Communications 6 resized 600

Trade show displays can elicit feelings as well. It was a bit of a roller coaster ride for the creator of Connectosaurus Rex. Can you imagine having sold the idea and then having to build it! This is a highly conservative industry, but the final product was a big hit. We even added a sound track. As the visitor walked by the monster piped up and told a joke!

This is bull

Last but not least, this ad won awards for its direct simplicity. Rules were made to be broken and this ad was negative toward the rumors competitors were circulating about our client. The ad reiterated those rumors and then refuted them.


If you liked this post, contrast it with Green marketing communications. Where you are going to have to use your brain, at some point.

How to Create Green Building Marketing Communications, Mar Com Blog post


Creative marketing communications

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Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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Integrate Your Corporate Brochure Strategically Into Marketing Communications

Tue, Feb 05, 2013 @ 01:48 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Literature Design, Promotional Brochure Design, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Metalworking Equipment Marketing, Advertising, Advertising Design, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, Advertising Literature Design, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Cincinnati Literature Design

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The introduction, the elevator speech, why choose me?

These are all goals of the introductory corporate marketing communication brochure. A combination of visual magnetism, history, curiosity and purpose. You certainly want someone who actually reads it to come away clearly understanding who you are and why they should trust you with their business.

In this example the company has three divisions. One division had invested in an attractive line of product literature and a corporate overview. Their marketing communications needed the corporate overview because the market didn't know the parent company as well as other players. When the time came for one of the other divisions to need a corporate brochure it was a natural to borrow some of the design elements and customize it to their market. The results are that as a whole, if all the divisions were being presented, the parent company looks focused on their markets and their customers.

Brochure Cover Design 1Brochure Cover Design 2

The brochure cover's number one purpose is to get someone to pick it up and open. In this case it is the reflection of a photo from the founding of the company in 1951. Hundreds of employees attended a holiday program in their new plant; the photographer captured them as they all turned around the face the camera. When we create the third brochure we'll use the same reflected image but in their product.

Cover Strategies:

  • Visual Magnetism - Use a clever visual technique that intrigues the reader and teases them with what the company does
  • Company name needs to be prominent
  • The company tag line should point to mission and vision

Usually these brochures don't stand-alone and are a continual process of evolution from previously printed pieces and web sites. And that's a good thing; rarely does a brand need a complete overhaul. The best thing is to stay on course and make small corrections. This sequence of photos illustrates the evolution of a rock crushing machine company over the last 50 years.

Brochure Design 1Brochure Design 2Brochure Design 3Brochure Design 4

Now for the reveal - the first spread! Make it good because it sets the tone for the rest of the brochure. 

Brochure Spread Design

In this example a cutaway drawing is used to illustrate the benefits and features of the product.

For multiple page brochures and catalogs a consistent grid is needed to establish the rhythm of information. To show the user where to find the information he is looking for. English readers follow an established path from the upper left to the upper right to the lower left and then the lower right. A "Z" path.

Brochure Design Grid resized 600

This image illustrates the cover and inside page grid for a four model machine tool spindle drill head.

Brochure design Cincinnati resized 600

This inside spread illustrates all the different voices you can mix and match to provide content and not tire the eye:
• Clear statement of who we are
• Our sister companies
• An aerial view of the plant says it all about the size and capabilities
• Our personal sales approach
• Our history through the group photos and the timeline
* For more information go to our web site

Finally, after the brochure is all done, out in the field and selling product your job isn't done. Listen closely to the feedback coming from the field and incorporate new ideas and benefit/features that help market the product. Sometimes the simplest changes help push just the right buttons in the sales cycle.



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Technical Illustration Guide for Marketing Communications

Tue, Jan 15, 2013 @ 10:52 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Literature Design, Process Equipment Marketing, Creative Industrial Marketing and Advertising, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, Advertising Design, Industrial Process Equipment, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, illustration, technical illustration, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Advertising Agency

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Technical illustration has evolved along with the industrial revolution and then the computer age to be an integral part of marketing communications.

Fortunately, it has also become easier over the years and now technical illustrations can be mastered by all types of employees.

Technical Illustration Red Shift resized 600

Notice how easy it is to see various elements in the illustrations above. Important parts are tinted red and the red color projects off the paper into the foreground. The blue border recedes into the background and makes the panel appear in three layers: Background blue border, middle ground gray valve and foreground red components.

Still, many lessons learned over the centuries by illustration artists haven’t been written into computer software and that is where history can come in to make your technical drawing better:
1. Make sure your illustration can be copied in black and white. Use black lines for the most important and blue tints that will disappear when you copy the illustration.
2. Red color brings the object to the foreground and blue recedes the item.
3. Better to use callout lines and place the descriptive text next to the described item than labeling the illustration A-Z or 1-N.

Technical Illustration Sequences resized 600

To the right, here’s another example of warm colors being used for important parts of the technical illustration and blue tinted objects receding behind the particles. It helps communication to use the red shift to help communication and not hinder it.

Technical drawings are quick and easy with Adobe Illustrator but communication takes a quantum leap when you add an isometric dimension. And all the measurements in the three dimensions can be taken directly off of the drawing.

For the ultimate in communication learn to use a 3D program like AutoCAD or Lightwave. Objects can be rotated to where they communicate what you are trying to portray and then fine tune the sectioning.

Steps 1, 2 and 3, will never go out of fashion for describing a sequence of events in a technical illustration. As is shown in this operation drawing, to the right, the viewer can easily see the important parts because they are tinted red as you go through the process.

Technical Illustration Chart resized 600

Our resident illustration artist, Art Director, Robert Jeffries, has created the perfect dimensional drawing here by coloring the important things black and the less important items blue. The dimensions and their locations will come across in a poor thermographic copy.

Technical Illustration Separtation of Planes

Don’t let your chart junk interfer with communication! When laying out a chart, remember the numerals are the most important thing. Don’t make the grid black lines and the text blue! It won’t copy and it will give your reader eye strain.

Your eye naturally follows the three step process in this technical illustration, to the right, because your eye follows the red colored objects.

Classic tinting and shaping of the different planes in your technical illustration is important to separate the planes. Remember, a change in direction means a change in tint. Any object can be clearly drawn by just using gray tints. Adobe Illustrator has some great tools for this as you can position the changing highlights across a surface to make it look like anything from round to oval.


Always remember that we read from left to right and from top to bottom. Arrange your multi-step technical illustrations in that order to make them flow most naturally. If you’re illustrating for other languages follow their conventions. Japanese read from top to bottom and from left to right.

It might sound obvious but the closer an item is to another the more related it should be. That means captions should be close to the object it describes. Even visual elements relate more to each other if they are closer together. The further away an object is from another the less it relates to it. And this also means that items that relate equally to each othr should be spaced equally from each other.

Technical Illustration Two Step Process resized 600

This simple two step process comes across beautifully because it reads from left to right, the callouts are near the object and it would still communicate it you removed the blue color.

 



Simple Technical Illustration resized 600
All the components we have discussed in this blog come together here in this simple but beautifully communicated technical illustration, to the right. The black lines clearly outline the important features. The warm colors emphasis the features being discussed and if copied would turn a medium gray tint.

In the Diverter Valve illustration below, you will see how naturally understood the tan colored pebbles flow. It’s because they seem to be floating on top of the blue colored valve. The pebbles’ color helps communicate the message.

We hope you have enjoyed this primer from Cincinnati technical illustration and drawing from Lohre & Assoc. It's what comes from over 35 years of experience, so don't get discouraged. Good design is obvious. If you keep that in mind you won't go wrong. Sometimes I say to my staff, "Does it pass the two-by-four and a six-pack test?" Have your audience drink a six pack of an adult beverage and hit them over the head with a two-by-four wooden board. If they can't understand what you are trying to communicate, go back to the drawing board! Chuck Lohre.

Technical Illustration & Photo

 

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Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

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2013 Industrial Marketing Communications Trends to Watch

Fri, Jan 11, 2013 @ 10:16 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Literature Design, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Cincinnati Advertising, Advertising Design, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, Advertising Literature Design, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Cincinnati Literature Design, Advertising Agency

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2013 is shaping up to be a big year for industrial marketing communications.

Process Equipment Marketing300

Internet marketing communications is being redefined by what's called inbound marketing. It's focusing on getting folks to visit your site, providing the content they want and tracking their visits so you can display custom ads just to them all across the internet as well as offer them targeted content. Fortunately there are tools that make this easier and less expensive.

Trade shows are continuing to be a necessary component of marketing communications but once again almost instant responses to visitors requests via email/Twitter and combining trade show leads with internet leads centralizes customer relationship management. And the tools are there to make this task easier and less expensive.

Finally the printed sales literature component of your marketing communications is taking a page from the internet as well, for shorter sound bites of information but also to encourage engagement of the prospect.

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