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Water Efficiency:  Reader Survey, Industrial Marketing Review

Tue, Oct 06, 2015 @ 03:54 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Marketing, Advertising, Advertising Design, Advertisement Design, print advertising, Advertising Agency

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Verizon - Very good ad with a real life photo of truckers. The message is a classic Call-To-Action with an eBook to download. Very well done.


Another great ad. Very clear headline, good photo and the copy gets right to the point about the guarantee. Directs folks to their booth and even social sharing buttons.


Starts out great with a clear metaphor of the dual nature of their business but then the copy says nothing except for a few buzz words. Sure it's pretty much impossible to actually use a testimonial but I would like to have one. At least an actual problem solution that demonstrates their capabilities would be better. With real numbers and real results.


It's very hard to have an attention getting ad without a human or an animal in it. It would have been better to put a fish in the glass. What is chlorsulfonated polyethylene? It's an honest question this ad should answer.

 
I take it back what I said about Burke. This ad is informative and doesn't have an animal in it. Good invitation to the product launch and a convincing story. A lot packed into a small package but it works. Good job, Crane.


Oh boy, "Settle the Fuck Down!" It's not even a metaphor for their process. Or so complicated I don't get it. Great photo and an easy to understand process that replaces flocculant. Why not explain it? They start in the fine print.


A branding ad with the name in the headline. Why waste the space? What does Aerostrip mean? Air-O-Strip? Strip-O-Air would be better. The copy begs for some actual detail about how it saves money and time. Is the floor mounting patented? 


If you can't say anything but your name at least show some projects. Some capacities or details of the photos would be nice.


Everything works great. I'd just like to know the guy's name and contact info, I'm ready to learn more. The promised application examples aren't on their web site.


Good information for applications. I guess the ad is dual purpose for manufacturing ideas and for membership. Pick one or the other, if you can.


What's the use of such a milk toast ad? Like logos on a Nascar? At least BASF had a slogan, "We don't make the products, we make them better." Better off using the cost of this ad to sponsor industry association meetings. They could use it. At least their local rep could get up and say a few words.


Nice informative ad. I like the story they tell and the clear product definition and illustration.


Good basic product ad. Begs to be online with the video link. I thought I was going to get a good demonstration but instead I got a long funky web page. Still don't understand how it eliminates a welded flange.

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Industrial Marketing Review 3-2015 Foundry Management & Technology Ads

Sun, Apr 19, 2015 @ 11:41 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Advertising, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, print advertisements, Advertising Agency

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Didion Advertising DesignDiDion Advertising Design 2 
Very good ad with four excellent testimonials. Good information but they didn't have to go negative with "Competition relies on hype, bogus claims and negative scare tactics."
 

Mold Handling Ad Design
Very good ad that matches the copy claims with the montage of images. If you recognized your facility, they have the equipment for you.
 

Iko Advertisement design
This is just a line card ad of the material list they supply. I wish they would have touched on at least one benefit for each product. They could have been tied to the montage of images, they illustrate the products' usage.
 

FSD Advertising DesignAdvertisement Design by FSD 
A little disappointed with the waste of space in this two page spread. Forget the flags on the second page and tie some location and result to the seven images on page one.
 

Advertisement Design for Vibra-Drum 
Good information in the copy but wasted space by using just about the same view for a large and small image. Better to use one and make it a cut-away that pointed out some of the benefit features.
 

Efficient Advertising Design
Liked everything about this ad except for the headline, "Efficient, Reliable and Advanced." It would be better to tie a specific testimonial benefit to them like, 125% Efficient, 110% Uptime and 65% Energy Savings. The copy can back up the headline claims.
 

Ad Design for GIFA 
Typical show ad. There must be something visual they could use instead of an illustrated globe. Industrial times are much better so maybe they could tout the record breaking increase in technical presentations, exhibitors and attendees? To quote the Director, Friedrich-Georg Kehrer, “In contrast to many capital goods trade fairs at other locations, there is no sign of a decline of any kind at our four trade fairs. The four events hold an almost unrivalled position anywhere in the world. Düsseldorf is the only place where companies reach the entire global market and this is vital for their business operations.”
 

Advertising Design for EC&S 
Everything is good about this ad except for the order and the headline. Quote some customer saying, "They Engineered a Solution and Built it Too." Put that at the top, with a follow up subhead, the photos and at the end the logo and signature. Focus on the service and not the source.
 

Ad Design for Foundry Technology 
One of the best ads but the headline is a real bummer. Maybe, "Four Ways to Ask Us to Set Your Equipment or Concept-To-Completion!"
 

Advertising Design for Hunter
Great ad, wish they had the budget to make it a full page. It wouldn't look so crowded and hard to read if it was on a white field.

Advertising made Creepy 
The secret to a good ad is to associate a common, memorable metaphor that reminds a reader about your unique sales proposition. I'm not sure about this metaphor. You have to create ads that the sales guys will like to use to get their point across. Passing out rubber gloves won't get the kind of attention you're looking for. Maybe get permission to use Norman Rockwell's illustration of the family physician checking the little girl's doll with the headline, "Checkups Even For Your Dreams."
 

Solutions Advertisement
The Ask ads are always top notch. Just wish they could say something coming from that engineer's mouth. Like, "Take a Close Look at How Much You Can Save With Our Solutions."
 

Sinto Advertisement
Begs for a testimonial. What am I looking at? Please point out the features that deliver durability, reliability and production.
 

Advertisement for Ajax TOCCO 
Good content but you can't communicate anything if you don't get their attention and the only way you can do that is to speak to the reader personally. I'd use one of their engineers to be in the ad and make a statement about customer service.
 
Heavy Duty Advertisement 
What does that illustration have to do with the lame headline anyway? Maybe it will come to me later but that's not the point in an ad. I'd use a 3D illustration of their equipment and focus on one industry's material running through it. Oh, now I get it. It's a rave, the machine jumped onto the floor and is body surfing the crowd.
 

First Step Advertisement 
Great copy. Please, just let an intern be the spokesperson, "At XYZ Company I learned to ask for advice and then think for myself." Isn't that the type of employee you're looking for?
 
Advertising for Cor-Met
No need to duplicate the company name in the headline and signature. The packaging and metals tell the story, maybe put them together, if that will help catch a eye.
 

Creative Advertising 
Great ad. "The brain takes just 33 milliseconds-three hundredths of a second, or a tenth of a time it takes to blink-to decide whether someone is to be trusted," could be worked into the message and be more powerful.
 

Inverter Advertising
I'm dying to see a stop action illustration of this but the device is pretty self evident. Great ad but I can't read the company's name.

Foundry Advertising 
Good quarter page ad. Don't change a thing.
 

Advertisement for Fosco 
There must be something more interesting those engineers said than that. From their site, "dedicated teams strategically positioned across the globe." So, "Our Technical Staff in Guangdong Can Visit Your Plant Tomorrow."
 

 If you liked this post you may like, "How to Write an Industrial Marketing Telemarketing Script."


Download our free guide to Creative Marketing Communications,

Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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How to Create Emotional Marketing Communications

Wed, Mar 20, 2013 @ 11:04 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Marketing, Industrial Advertising, Industrial Marketing Advertising, Industrial Marketing Trade Show, Literature Design, Promotional Brochure Design, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Marketing and Advertising Fun, Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising, Advertising Design, Business to Business Advertising, Cincinnati Advertising Agency, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, Advertising Literature Design, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Cincinnati Literature Design, Advertising Agency, Ad Design

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To create marketing people love, you need to appeal to their emotions.

As said in his blog, "People buy on emotion—and justify by logic." You can learn more about emotional persuasion at the Wikipedia post where it lists these appeals to emotion:

  • Advertising
  • Faith
  • Presentation and Imagination
  • Propaganda
  • Pity
  • Seduction
  • Tradition

Breakthroguh Marketing Communications 1 resized 600
This ad "connects" with the viewer because it contains a human hand. The connectors on the fingers make you think about why they are there. Are they hurting the hand? What are they doing there? Adding a body part into an ad is like adding a person. It's also one reason testimonials are successful when there's a photo of the person, looking at you, telling their experiences. If the story is good enough, your opinion will be changed.

 

Emotional Marketing Communications 2 resized 600

Why does this ad evoke a visceral reaction? No one likes a messy job. Here's a solution. And then, there are those hands again! You only have a few seconds to introduce the main benefit and visual that backs it up. The double entendre, from something that you can hold in your hand to a push-button effort, always helps develop the main visual and headline. Your brain looks at it like a riddle. And who doesn't like trying to solve a riddle?

 

Emotional Marketing Communications 3 resized 600

This is one of the most humorous ads the agency has ever produced. It was fun to do and started out as a takeoff on the Splice Girls, but the lawyers said we had to make it a parody. So out went the attractive young ladies, and in came the construction workers dressed in drag. Those husky models were a bit surprised at the costumes we had for them! Like other successful ads we've done, it was immediately ripped out of the publication and stuck on the company billboard with callouts of the likely suspects in the company identified! It's the print equivalent of going viral.


Emotional marketing Communications 4 resized 600

This is the most "graphic" ad the agency produced and so were reactions. Some people really didn't like it, but most were amused and everyone remembered it. Phone calls to the client (immediately after publication) complained it cast the industry in a bad light. (The rendering business is in the business of reducing carcasses to pulp for further processing.) This ad style is hard to pull off. Industrial marketing's job is to tell a simple story with a benefit. Not to polarize the market or give the viewer any reason to go elsewhere. If you can't be funny, memorable and educational in industrial advertising, you're on thin ice. Negative ads almost always backfire in B2B. Your local TV news is all about bad news, social media is about good news. Read more about that effect in The Economic Times.


Emotional marketing Communications 5 resized 600

The use of strong, evocative words can make your ad work. The play on words leads to the small application photo.


Emotional Marketing Communications 6 resized 600

Trade show displays can elicit feelings as well. It was a bit of a roller coaster ride for the creator of Connectosaurus Rex. Can you imagine having sold the idea and then having to build it! This is a highly conservative industry, but the final product was a big hit. We even added a sound track. As the visitor walked by the monster piped up and told a joke!

This is bull

Last but not least, this ad won awards for its direct simplicity. Rules were made to be broken and this ad was negative toward the rumors competitors were circulating about our client. The ad reiterated those rumors and then refuted them.


If you liked this post, contrast it with Green marketing communications. Where you are going to have to use your brain, at some point.

How to Create Green Building Marketing Communications, Mar Com Blog post


Creative marketing communications

Download our free guide to Creative Marketing Communications,

Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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Technical Illustration Guide for Marketing Communications

Tue, Jan 15, 2013 @ 10:52 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Industrial Advertising, Literature Design, Process Equipment Marketing, Creative Industrial Marketing and Advertising, Industrial Marketing and Advertising Literature, Business to Business Marketing, B2B Marketing, B2B Advertising, Equipment Marketing and Advertising, Advertising Design, Industrial Process Equipment, Advertisement Design, Advertising Literature, print advertising, illustration, technical illustration, Corporate Advertising Literature, print advertisements, Advertising Agency

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Technical illustration has evolved along with the industrial revolution and then the computer age to be an integral part of marketing communications.

Fortunately, it has also become easier over the years and now technical illustrations can be mastered by all types of employees.

Technical Illustration Red Shift resized 600

Notice how easy it is to see various elements in the illustrations above. Important parts are tinted red and the red color projects off the paper into the foreground. The blue border recedes into the background and makes the panel appear in three layers: Background blue border, middle ground gray valve and foreground red components.

Still, many lessons learned over the centuries by illustration artists haven’t been written into computer software and that is where history can come in to make your technical drawing better:
1. Make sure your illustration can be copied in black and white. Use black lines for the most important and blue tints that will disappear when you copy the illustration.
2. Red color brings the object to the foreground and blue recedes the item.
3. Better to use callout lines and place the descriptive text next to the described item than labeling the illustration A-Z or 1-N.

Technical Illustration Sequences resized 600

To the right, here’s another example of warm colors being used for important parts of the technical illustration and blue tinted objects receding behind the particles. It helps communication to use the red shift to help communication and not hinder it.

Technical drawings are quick and easy with Adobe Illustrator but communication takes a quantum leap when you add an isometric dimension. And all the measurements in the three dimensions can be taken directly off of the drawing.

For the ultimate in communication learn to use a 3D program like AutoCAD or Lightwave. Objects can be rotated to where they communicate what you are trying to portray and then fine tune the sectioning.

Steps 1, 2 and 3, will never go out of fashion for describing a sequence of events in a technical illustration. As is shown in this operation drawing, to the right, the viewer can easily see the important parts because they are tinted red as you go through the process.

Technical Illustration Chart resized 600

Our resident illustration artist, Art Director, Robert Jeffries, has created the perfect dimensional drawing here by coloring the important things black and the less important items blue. The dimensions and their locations will come across in a poor thermographic copy.

Technical Illustration Separtation of Planes

Don’t let your chart junk interfer with communication! When laying out a chart, remember the numerals are the most important thing. Don’t make the grid black lines and the text blue! It won’t copy and it will give your reader eye strain.

Your eye naturally follows the three step process in this technical illustration, to the right, because your eye follows the red colored objects.

Classic tinting and shaping of the different planes in your technical illustration is important to separate the planes. Remember, a change in direction means a change in tint. Any object can be clearly drawn by just using gray tints. Adobe Illustrator has some great tools for this as you can position the changing highlights across a surface to make it look like anything from round to oval.


Always remember that we read from left to right and from top to bottom. Arrange your multi-step technical illustrations in that order to make them flow most naturally. If you’re illustrating for other languages follow their conventions. Japanese read from top to bottom and from left to right.

It might sound obvious but the closer an item is to another the more related it should be. That means captions should be close to the object it describes. Even visual elements relate more to each other if they are closer together. The further away an object is from another the less it relates to it. And this also means that items that relate equally to each othr should be spaced equally from each other.

Technical Illustration Two Step Process resized 600

This simple two step process comes across beautifully because it reads from left to right, the callouts are near the object and it would still communicate it you removed the blue color.

 



Simple Technical Illustration resized 600
All the components we have discussed in this blog come together here in this simple but beautifully communicated technical illustration, to the right. The black lines clearly outline the important features. The warm colors emphasis the features being discussed and if copied would turn a medium gray tint.

In the Diverter Valve illustration below, you will see how naturally understood the tan colored pebbles flow. It’s because they seem to be floating on top of the blue colored valve. The pebbles’ color helps communicate the message.

We hope you have enjoyed this primer from Cincinnati technical illustration and drawing from Lohre & Assoc. It's what comes from over 35 years of experience, so don't get discouraged. Good design is obvious. If you keep that in mind you won't go wrong. Sometimes I say to my staff, "Does it pass the two-by-four and a six-pack test?" Have your audience drink a six pack of an adult beverage and hit them over the head with a two-by-four wooden board. If they can't understand what you are trying to communicate, go back to the drawing board! Chuck Lohre.

Technical Illustration & Photo

 

If you would like to learn more about the creative process, please request our Creative Guide, below.

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Request our free guide to Creative Marketing Communications,

Chuck Lohre's AdVenture Presentation of examples and descriptions from Ed Lawler's book of the same title - 10 Rules On Creating Business-To-Business Ads

Industrial Marketing Creative Guide by Lohre Marketing and Advertising, Cincinnati

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