Media skips concrete details fit to print

Aug 6, 2018 2:58:37 PM / by Don Marsh posted in Green Marketing, green education, concrete

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A May CNN Style post, “Can the building industry break its addiction to concrete?,” credits concrete with defining construction in recent centuries, then sharply digresses: “But do we need to re-evaluate our concrete habit for our sakes and the planet’s? Production of cement is disastrous for our biosphere, while the degradation of many concrete buildings has some experts predicting a colossal headache in the future.” Author Thomas Page follows that aggressive take with minimal examination of concrete structures’ role in quality of life basics—from water supply and wastewater conveyance and treatment, to transportation infrastructure, to a built environment known for withstanding exposure to fire and nature’s forces. Exploring load-worthy alternatives to concrete with materials and design experts, he points to a California building’s 24-in. thick, rammed-earth walls.

Journalist Vince Beiser raises global warming and resource depletion concerns in a June Los Angeles Times commentary, “Concrete is the stuff civilization is made of. But for all its blessings, there are huge environmental costs.” Absent honest context of durability and life cycle matters related to exterior and interior concrete structures, he suggests, “We tend to assume concrete is as permanent as the stone it mimics. It isn’t. Concrete fails and fractures in dozens of ways.”

As author of The World in a Grain: The Story of Sand and How It Transformed Civilization (Penguin Books, August 2018), Beiser appreciates concrete buildings’ role in stepped up urbanization the world over. He cites a United Nations estimate of 65 million people locating to cities annually, but trivializes the near-permanent nature of a concrete slab or elevated slab structure bearing on properly engineered foundations.

The National Ready Mixed Concrete Association-backed Build With Strength coalition challenged the pursuit of alternatives to concrete, noting, “Amidst our ever-increasing population density, noncombustible construction keeps us safe in our homes, work-places, schools and places of worship … The assertion that a noncombustible construction material be replaced leaves us vulnerable to development with cheaper materials that put lives in danger.”

For a look at construction light on concrete, Beiser should check local media reports on a February 2018 fire at the three-story, wood-framed Corsica Apartment Homes near Los Angeles. It is among dozens of Build With Strength-spotlighted incidents involving existing or new wood construction.

Without asking Beiser about the air pollution attending wood construction fires, not to mention their often heavy human costs, the coalition continues its “Concrete is the stuff” response by clarifying an environmental point: “The author links concrete to global carbon emissions, but only tells half the story by omitting that the sustainable and insulating nature of concrete contribute to the lower lifetime energy usage and costs to heat and cool these structures.”

Weeks after “Can the building industry break its addiction to concrete?,” the Cable News Network balanced its coverage. A CNN Money segment focused on the carbon-sequestering properties of concrete structures cast from mixes using the CarbonCure Technologies process. It discovered how carbon dioxide imparts performance in fresh and finished slabs and structures in a visit with lead CarbonCure user, Atlanta-based Thomas Concrete.

The segment, “This concrete traps CO2 emissions forever,” is a good reference to journalists seeking a pertinent angle on concrete. Thomas Concrete and Build With Strength coalition members are among many authoritative sources with insight on probing questions like: Is there a viable alternative to concrete on the horizon? Is the negligible CO2 load associated with portland cement-based products a good trade off for the superior life cycle attributes certain in properly designed, placed and finished slabs, structures and enclosure elements?

(Thanks to Don Marsh for his editorial, you can learn more at the publication's site.)

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Cool Green Marketing Events in Cincinnati for November 2016

Oct 31, 2016 10:02:38 AM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Marketing, Green Building Marketing

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Cool Green Building Marketing Events for September 2016

Sep 13, 2016 2:58:00 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Marketing, Green Building Marketing, Green Building, Featured, Tiny Homes

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Sep 17, 10 till Noon, Whitney Converted Barn Residence, Southwest Ohio USGBC Green Home Tour,Anderson Township. Learn more.



Sep 17, 4 - 11 pm, Music in the Woods,
Imago For The Earth, 700 Enright, Cincinnati, OH 45205. Two free tickets if you talk up Earth Day Cincinnati 2017. Learn more.



Sep 19, 11:30 - 1:30 pm, Well Building Standard Introduction, 1333 Pendleton St
Cincinnati, OH 45202, Sponsored in part by Greener Stock. Learn more.



Sep 25, Noon - 5 pm, Northside home tour, Get a glimpse into the architectural life of Cincinnati’s most eclectic neighborhood. Learn more.

Whitney Barn House Green Home Tour Sep 17, 10 am till Noon


The tour is free to USGBC Chapter members (you can bring a guest). Non-members are asked to make a suggested donation of $15 per person. Contact Chair Chuck Lohre to register, 513-260-9025, chuck@lohre.com.

From: "Remodeled Anderson Township barn becomes gorgeous modern dream home. Couple's dream home rises up from unlikely place,"
by Brent Coleman, WCPO contributor. Photos by Joseph Fuqua LL.

ANDERSON TOWNSHIP, Ohio — Jerry Whitney wasn’t looking to move, but he was looking for a clear route from his Anderson Township home to the airport on a day when interstate traffic was heavy. So he cut down Five Mile Road toward Kellogg Avenue.

“I didn’t want to miss my flight,” he said. “And then I saw this place and said, ‘Oh, my god, look at that barn.’ And then I saw a ‘for sale’ sign and Five Mile Creek behind it.”

He fell in love. When his wife of 14 years, Karen, saw it, she fell in love, too.

On Dec. 31, 2012, seven days after that first sighting, the Whitneys bought the 30-year-old horse barn and its seven acres at a 30 percent discount from a motivated seller. It cost them $300,000.

Fast forward 18 months and the Whitneys – who had no previous home construction experience – moved out of a 300-square-foot trailer on the property into a home like no other, a dream house they played a big role in designing and decorating.

The shock of the unexpected experience has worn off, but not the excitement and contentment they feel for their fully modern, energy-efficient barn house. Also still strong is their appreciation for their project partners – among them architect Marc McConnell, builder Paul Kapitula, Keidel Supply, A&S Lighting, Tate Builders Supply, Cooknee Cabinets, KBR Countertop Specialists, Home Depot, IKEA, The Container Store and Peoples First Savings Bank.

All these forces came together to produce a four-bedroom, three-bathroom showcase of modern architecture and engineering that surprisingly fits inside a big, old, round-top home originally built for horses.

Not only does the place run on a geothermal energy system that held down last summer’s utility bills to $90 per month, it is designed to be the Whitneys’ "forever home." The couple asked for and got what architects call “living in place” features that will allow the Whitneys, who are in their 60s, to stay in their home permanently.

The house’s hallways and doors are extra-wide. There’s a 4-foot-wide shaft just behind a door off the entry hall where an elevator to the second floor and its master bedroom can be installed if and when it is needed. Next to the shaft is a laundry room with a chute from the second floor. The master bathroom’s shower door is wide and wheelchair-accessible. Even the landscaping is designed to require minimal maintenance and no chemicals.

There are picture windows in every main room through which the Whitneys, for the rest of their lives, can watch the water rush down Five Mile Creek, lots of wildlife – deer, cardinals, doves, woodpeckers, nut hatches, tufted titmice and blue jays – and the moon and stars.

 

Southwest Ohio Regional U.S. Green Building Chapter Host Eight Green Home Tours Each Year

We're promoting sustainable home tours and events in the hope that a community of passionate individuals will come together to help each other create green homes in the Tri-State and support the Southwestern Ohio Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. Learn moreThe tours are free to Cincinnati USGBC Chapter members (you can bring a guest), join the Chapter. Non-members are asked to make a donation of $15 per person. Contact Chair Chuck Lohre to receive reminders or register for any of the tours, Chuck@Lohre.com, 513-260-9025. The 2016 Tours are sponsored by The
Sustainable Partnership of Cincinnati, a group of businesses offering sustainable products and services to create sustainable homes and offices. Learn more at www.tspcincy.com.

 

More Green Events in September:

Sep 15, 4 - 7pm, Covington Center for Great Neighborhoods 40th
Anniversary Celebration &
Hellmann Creative Center Grand Opening
, 321 W. MLK/12th St., Covington, KY - You are invited to help us celebrate 40 years of community building in Covington and the opening of our new facility. Join us for local food, live music, and a tour of Hellmann, featuring The Center's new office space on the second floor, two community meeting rooms, and first floor artist studios. For lots more details on the event, read the article from Soapbox or join our event on facebook. 

Sep 17, 10:00am - 3:00pm, Electric Vehicle Ride-and-Drive in Cincinnati, Tri-County Mall, 11700 Princeton Pike, In the Parking Lot Between Ethan Allen and BJ’s Brewhouse. Pick the EV of Your Choice for a Free Ride / Drive! BMW i3, BMW i8, BMW 330e, BMWx5, Chevy Volt Nissan Leaf, Tesla Models S and X, electric bicycles, electric motorcycles, Workhorse EGEN, Zenith Van Learn about free parking for EV’s in Cincinnati! Talk with EV owners, learn why they love their EV’s!

Fall Grants Classes at the Public Library Downtown
Grants Research Lab, Wednesday September 14th, 6-8pm, Third floor computer lab, registration recommended at this link.
Introduction to Proposal Writing, Monday September 19th, 10am-12pm, Huenefeld Tower Room, no registration required.
Introduction to Fundraising Planning, Wednesday September 21st, 6:15-8:15pm, Huenefeld Tower Room, no registration required. This class is offered every 3 months.
Form 990: Understanding Nonprofit IRS Filings, Tuesday October 4, 10am-12pm, Huenefeld Tower Room, no registration required. This presentation by lawyer Chad Eckhardt of Frost Brown Todd will discuss the form 990 filed by nonprofit organizations, including tips on how best to fulfill your organization’s obligations to the IRS and the role of the form 990 as a publicly disclosed document with information about your organization.
For more inforamtion on the classes contact: Phoebe Acheson, Grants Resource Librarian, Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Phoebe.acheson@cincinnatilibrary.org, 513-369-6934

What's the best way to learn more about Green Building Marketing?
1. Share this post on your social media using the links above and get raffle chances to win a Friday Day Pass to an epic celebration at Greenbuild Oct. 7, 2016, including Wednesday and Thursday Expo passes: Iconic Green in Los Angeles, California. A $225 value for non-USGBC members.

2. Or click below to email me for lunch and a...

Complimentary Green Building Consultation

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Update on Brad Cooper's Tiny Homes and Green Building Marketing

Aug 23, 2016 5:11:37 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Marketing, Green Building Marketing, Green Building, Tiny Homes

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We gave Brad Cooper a call just now and he's still working on the details for the two homes on Pete St. There are many hoops to jump through regarding zoning such small homes as well as financing. Some small home builders offer their own financing to get around the traditional appraisal networks. The "Greening the MLS Form" will help provide guidelines for value in green building marketing, but it just launched last month in Cincinnati.

The Dayton Tiny Housers Meetup Group came down for the Grace and Corbett Lunsford "Tiny Lab - Proof is Possible" tour, "TV and film personalities Corbett and Grace Lunsford will lead an entire week of Tiny House Tours and workshops for homeowners, realtors, and remodelers. As a showcase for their 20-city “Proof Is Possible Tour, ” the Lunsford’s #Tiny Lab is built to the highest performance standards – the most energy efficient, the best indoor air quality, the most comfortable, the most durable, net-zero, and with green materials. With built in sensors to prove it, this house demonstrates best practices that you can do yourself, and explains how to get your contractors to use best practices in your remodeling projects to deliver proven, verified results. "

It was an inspiring experience. Such a small home with two cats and a baby, but the air was as fresh as a National Park. The take away I got from Corbett's presenation was that their journey was not as much about tiny homes as high performance homes. The high tech devices and energy efficiency measures arn't meant to be cheap. They are based on testing and performance. Corbett just doesn't have the HVAC guys install a system in his home, he requires them to guarantee it will perform buy testing to the manufacturer's specifications. You would be surprized how under performing boilers and ACs are if you test them.

Brad and I discussed what the differences between a trailer park and a tiny home community. He had never been to a trailer park, I haven't either, but I guess that home orientation, native and adaptive landscape, bike versus auto friendly, solar power, rain harvesting, chickens and permaculture would set the two apart. You wouldn't find confederate flags, Cadiliacs and a lack of recycling at a sustainable community. Not that there is anything wrong with a Cadillac but there is with the other two.

Next year the USGBC Soutwest Ohio Chapter's Green Home Tour Series will visit Sandy Hamilton's tiny home in Hyde Park. We look forward to learning more about how she and architect Edward Wright over came the zoning requirements. There are still a few spots left on the upcoming tour, "September 17, 2016; 10 am till Noon: Whitney Residence, Anderson, OH – A “Quonset Roof” style barn conversion with geo-thermal and radiant heat. Learn more from Nancy Kibbee’s article in “Natural Interiors.” House Trends’ articles: “Remodeling ideas create a barn re-born” and “Home remodel gives new life to barn.” And here’s a link to Brent Colman’s Article for Channel 9." Please get in touch.

 

New project #FreshLookataBoxwith6OpeningsFoodWaterHeat #ProjectGoals #responsibilities

A photo posted by Start Small (@startsmallhomes) on

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Is LEED Dynamic Plaque Good for Green Building Marketing?

Aug 15, 2016 5:30:06 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Marketing, Green Building Marketing, Green Building, Featured, Tiny Homes

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We just started our free trial of the LEED Dynamic Plaque. It all came about because there is an inexpensive VOC monitor now available, Foobot. It's also a CO2 and particulate monitor. CO2 and VOC reporting are required for the LEED Dynamic Plaque. We're a Beta tester for Foobot because we are a NEST Dealer. So far it has been working well and we look forward to learning more about the indoor air quality over time in our office. Our visitors are amazed the technology exists and the Foobot has a prominent place in the breathing zone of our conference room. Its rythmic blue pulse, like breathing, indicates the air is good, it will glow orange if there are particulates, too much CO2 or VOCs in the environment. The device is managed from your smart phone.

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Cool Green Cincinnati Events for August 2016 and Tiny Homes!

Aug 8, 2016 2:31:26 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Marketing, Green Building Marketing, Green Building, Tiny Homes

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Aug 8-13, 9 am till 7 pm, Tiny Homes Lab: a touring tiny house at Green Man Park, 770 East McMillan St. Cincinnati, OH 45206. A new standard for proof in stationary and mobile tiny home construction in heating and cooling, indoor air quality, design and aesthetics. Learn more.


Aug 10, 9 am, Streetcar Community Meeting, Aronoff Center in the Founders Room (enter off 7th at Walnut St.). Can't make the meeting? Schedule a streetcar safety presentation for your organization, school, group or business. Email Brandy Jones at bjones@go-metro.com for more information.

Aug 13, 7-10 pm, Community Shares Grub For Good, at the NEW Kennedy Heights Cultural Arts Campus Annex, 6620 Montgomery Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45213. Amateur chef cook-off with 50 chefs competing in various categories. Celebrity Chef Jean-Philippe with Jean-Robert's Restaurant. Learn more.  
 
Aug 27, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm, Gifts from the Beehive at the Civic Garden CenterInstructor: Carisa Hund-Bunten, Owner of 7th Street Gifts, Cost: $30, Participants will create their own recipes using beeswax and local raw honey. Therapeutic grade ingredients will be used in take-home recipes for a beeswax candle, body cosmetic, and an edible treat. Click here to register.
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USGBC Green Home Tours Start Again Sep 17, 2016

We're promoting sustainable home tours and events in the hope that a community of passionate individuals will come together to help each other create green homes in the Tri-State and support the Southwestern Ohio Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council. The next tour is September 17, 2016 at the Whitney Residence in Anderson.Learn moreThe tours are free to Cincinnati USGBC Chapter members (you can bring a guest), join the Chapter. Non-members are asked to make a suggested donation of $15 per person. Contact Chair Chuck Lohre to receive reminders or register for any of the tours, Chuck@Lohre.com, 513-260-9025. The 2016 Tours are sponsored by The Sustainable Partnership of Cincinnati, a group of businesses offering sustainable products and services to create sustainable homes and offices. Learn more at www.tspcincy.com.

 
What's the best way to learn more about Green Building?

Share this post on your social media, by clicking the links below, and get raffle chances to win a Friday Day Pass to an epic celebration at Greenbuild Oct. 7, 2016, including Wednesday and Thursday Expo passes: Iconic Green in Los Angeles, California, https://greenbuildexpo.com. A $225 value for non-USGBC members.
         
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Community of Tiny Homes or a Trailer Park?

Aug 1, 2016 9:42:53 PM / by Chuck Lohre posted in Green Marketing, Green Building Marketing, Green Building

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(What's different between a tiny home subdivision and a trailer park? It can be a great deal. We've shared these communications of the Dayton Tiny Housers so those that are interested in a community of highly efficient smaller homes can come together and benefit from a neighborhood that understands why the homes face the sun, everybody recycles and shares in a community garden. Not the typical appearance of your local trailer park. Hopefully a group will form in Cincinnati. Read more about "Bradley Cooper's "Start Small" Tiny Home Project in OTR." in a collection of events and articles we published in an earlier post. In the 1950s a group of individuals that wanted a different environment to raise their families started Pleasantville near Tarrytown, NY. Several of the homes were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and all of them used Usonian design principals. We have learned a great deal since then and the time has come for a community reflecting the principals of the U.S. Green Building Council's measurable environmental benefits.
A community of sustainable tiny homes can be excellent examples of proper siting, alternative transportation, urban gardening and conscious community.)

From Gary Wags' email dated July 26, 2016

I'm passing this information out to all those in the Dayton Tiny House Meetup group - in time for our bi-weekly session on Thursday evening. If you missed the Quickie last Saturday, you missed a lot of potential - tiny living is closer to reality than you might think! This is one clean, quiet and well maintained "park" (more park than trailer) close to Dayton. If we can set a precedent in New Lebanon, it will be even easier to expand this concept to other Montgomery County communities including Dayton. There will be more information on Thursday, so if you are unsure of a trailer park, please come to the Wyoming Branch Library and get your questions answered directly from the source, the new owners. Here is their take on the project and some of their plans. Here's Will:

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